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Depth-Of-Field Hyperfocal Distance Charts

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Category: General Photography

Depth-Of-Field Hyperfocal Distance Charts - Find the ideal hyperfocal distance to ensure your landscape images are sharp throughout.

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David Clapp - A man walks down the steps at Glastonbury Tor towards a misty Somerset Levels at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, UK
Photo by David Clapp.
 
When shooting landscapes it can be difficult to get the whole scene sharp and knowing the hyperfocal distance will help you to do so. This is the distance that you should focus on to maximise depth-of-field, thus keeping the whole scene sharp. When the lens is focused at this distance, all objects at distances from half of the hyperfocal distance out to infinity will be acceptably sharp.

You can guess the hyperfocal focusing distance, but life is much easier if your lens is marked with a depth-of-field scale. This used to be regarded as an essential feature, but with the development of wide-ranging zooms many manufacturers now omit one. If you do have such a scale, simply line up the infinity mark against the mark for the aperture you've set and, although the image in the viewfinder will look out-of-focus, the finished image will be sharp from front to back.

There is a mathematical formula which can be used to find the hyperfocal distance:

H = ( f2 / Nc ) + f where f is the focal length, N is the aperture and c is the circle of confusion. To create the tables below which can be used for reference, we have taken the circle of confusion to equal 0.029mm for full frame DSLR's, 0.019mm for APS-C Nikon/Sony/Pentax, 0.018mm for APS-C Canon and 0.015mm for Four Thirds.

  16mm 20mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 100mm 135mm 200mm 300mm
f/2.8 3.2m 4.9m 7.1m 9.7m 15.1m 30.8m 123.3m 224.6m 492.8m 1108.7m
f/4 2.2m 3.5m 5.0m 6.8m 10.6m 21.6m 86.3m 157.2m 345.0m 776.2m
f/5.6 1.6m 2.5m 3.6m 4.9m 7.6m 15.4m 61.7m 112.4m 246.5m 554.5m
f/8 1.1m 1.7m 2.5m 3.4m 5.3m 10.8m 43.2m 78.7m 172.6m 388.2m
f/11 0.8m 1.3m 1.8m 2.5m 3.9m 7.9m 31.4m 57.3m 125.6m 282.4m
f/16 0.6m 0.9m 1.3m 1.7m 2.7m 5.4m 21.7m 39.4m 86.4m 194.3m
f/22 0.4m 0.6m 0.9m 1.3m 2.0m 4.0m 15.8m 28.7m 62.9m 141.4m
f/32 0.3m 0.5m 0.6m 0.9m 1.4m 2.7m 10.9m 19.8m 43.3m 97.3m
Full-frame DSLR's

  16mm 20mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 100mm 135mm 200mm 300mm
f/2.8 4.8m 7.5m 10.9m 14.8m 23.1m 47.0m 188.1m 342.7m 752.1m 1692.0m
f/4 3.4m 5.3m 7.6m 10.3m 16.2m 32.9m 131.7m 239.9m 526.5m 1184.5m
f/5.6 2.4m 3.8m 5.4m 7.4m 11.5m 23.5m 94.1m 171.4m 376.1m 846.2m
f/8 1.7m 2.7m 3.8m 5.2m 8.1m 16.5m 65.9m 120.m 263.4m 592.4m
f/11 1.2m 1.9m 1.8m 3.8m 5.9m 12.0m 47.9m 87.3m 191.6m 430.9m
f/16 0.9m 1.3m 1.9m 2.6m 4.1m 8.3m 33.0m 60.1m 131.8m 296.4m
f/22 0.6m 1.0m 1.4m 1.9m 3.0m 6.0m 24.0m 43.7m 95.9m 215.6m
f/32 0.4m 0.7m 1.0m 1.3m 2.0m 4.2m 16.5m 30.1m 66.0m 148.3m
APS-C Nikon/Sony/Pentax

  16mm 20mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 100mm 135mm 200mm 300mm
f/2.8 5.1m 8.0m 11.5m 15.6m 24.3m 49.7m 198.5m 361.7m 793.9m 1786.0m
f/4 3.6m 5.6m 8.0m 10.9m 17.0m 34.8m 139.0m 253.3m 555.8m 1250.3m
f/5.6 2.6m 4.0m 5.7m 7.8m 12.2m 24.9m 99.3m 180.9m 397.0m 893.2m
f/8 1.8m 2.8m 4.0m 5.5m 8.5m 17.4m 69.5m 126.7m 278.0m 625.3m
f/11 1.3m 2.0m 2.9m 4.0m 6.2m 12.7m 50.6m 92.2m 202.2m 454.8m
f/16 0.9m 1.4m 2.0m 2.8m 4.3m 8.7m 34.8m 63.4m 139.1m 312.8m
f/22 0.7m 1.0m 1.5m 2.0m 3.1m 6.4m 25.4m 46.2m 101.2m 227.6m
f/32 0.5m 0.7m 1.0m 1.4m 2.2m 4.4m 17.5m 31.8m 69.6m 156.6m
APS-C Canon

  16mm 20mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 100mm 135mm 200mm 300mm
f/2.8 6.1m 9.5m 13.7m 18.7m 29.2m 59.6m 238.2m 434.1m 952.6m 2143.2m
f/4 4.3m 6.7m 9.6m 13.1m 20.5m 41.7m 166.8m 303.9m 666.9m 1500.3m
f/5.6 3.1m 4.8m 6.9m 9.4m 14.6m 29.8m 119.1m 217.1m 476.4m 1071.7m
f/8 2.1m 3.4m 4.8m 6.6m 10.2m 20.9m 83.4m 152.0m 333.5m 750.3m
f/11 1.6m 2.4m 3.5m 4.8m 7.5m 15.2m 60.7m 110.6m 242.6m 545.8m
f/16 1.1m 1.7m 2.4m 3.3m 5.1m 10.5m 41.8m 76.1m 166.9m 375.3m
f/22 0.8m 1.2m 1.8m 2.4m 3.7m 7.6m 30.4m 55.4m 121.4m 273.0m
f/32 0.5m 0.9m 1.2m 1.7m 2.6m 5.3m 20.9m 38.1m 83.5m 187.8m
Four Thirds

  16mm 20mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 100mm 135mm 200mm 300mm
f/2.8 4.0m 6.2m 9.0m 12.2m 19.1m 38.9m 155.4m 283.1m 621.3m 1397.8m
f/4 2.8m 4.4m 6.3m 8.5m 13.4m 27.2m 108.8m 198.2m 435.0m 978.6m
f/5.6 2.0m 3.1m 4.5m 6.1m 9.5m 19.5m 77.7m 141.6m 310.8m 699.1m
f/8 1.4m 2.2m 3.2m 4.3m 6.7m 13.6m 54.4m 99.2m 217.6m 489.4m
f/11 1.0m 1.6m 2.3m 3.1m 4.9m 9.9m 39.6m 72.2m 158.3m 356.0m
f/16 0.7m 1.1m 1.6m 2.2m 3.4m 6.8m 27.3m 49.7m 108.9m 244.9m
f/22 0.5m 0.8m 1.2m 1.6m 2.5m 5.0m 19.9m 36.2m 79.3m 178.2m
f/32 0.4m 0.6m 0.8m 1.1m 1.7m 3.4m 13.7m 24.9m 54.5m 122.6m
APS-H Canon

When you have found the value required from the tables you simply need to set the lens focus to the distance and the depth-of-field will extend from half that distance to infinity, if you have a lens with a distance scale on. If not you have to estimate the distance and focus on it.


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Comments

pabloisme
pabloisme  3565 forum posts England
3 Oct 2011 - 2:52 PM

well that'll stop them using it!

when I was a boy there was a card (all binned now?) HF calculator with all the distances from nearest to furthest "sharp" point, there wern't so many focal lengths then....

mmmmm wonder if there would be enough demand for an app?

ps; the table looks like BT's worksheet, as to why the broadband is not working!

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3 Oct 2011 - 3:14 PM

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pabloisme
pabloisme  3565 forum posts England
3 Oct 2011 - 3:14 PM

OPPPS! sorry!! did a check & someone beat me to it!

I am now the proud posessor of an android app to calculate dof / hyperfocal distance

Last Modified By pabloisme at 3 Oct 2011 - 3:14 PM
NeilS
NeilS e2 Member 7801 forum postsNeilS vcard United Kingdom
3 Oct 2011 - 4:47 PM

What about us folk with an ASP- H 1.3x crop sensor

pabloisme
pabloisme  3565 forum posts England
4 Oct 2011 - 7:14 AM

got an android? phone or tablet? it on one of them APPS that is! (about 10 to12 to choose from)

even a linhof 5x4! mmmmmmmmmmm

(those were made when crop sensors were farmers!)

YoBellzaa
YoBellzaa ePHOTOzine Staff 7224 forum postsYoBellzaa vcard England
6 Oct 2011 - 2:34 PM

Hi Neil, I have added the ASP-H distances.

bigaly
bigaly  3
6 Oct 2011 - 3:04 PM

have now enrolled at university ???? to understand it ???

ANNIEKERR
ANNIEKERR  3 Ireland
21 Oct 2011 - 10:01 PM

I have a Canon 7D with a kit 15-85mm IS lens - what does the infinity mark look like to see if I have one or not because DOF is something I'm struggling with Sad

Pete
Pete Site Moderator 1218416 forum postsPete vcard ePz Advertiser England96 Constructive Critique Points
21 Oct 2011 - 10:54 PM

the infinity mark is like a letter 8 laid down on its side

pabloisme
pabloisme  3565 forum posts England
22 Oct 2011 - 8:14 AM

sent a PM as you DO know (but havent worked it out yet!)

SueLeonard
23 Oct 2011 - 8:22 PM

Well that's nice and confusing.Sad

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