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DXO Mark

DXO Mark - Created by leading image science company DxO Labs, this free online resource delivers in-depth, objective RAW-based image quality data to enable fair analysis and comparison of digital cameras.

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Press Release:
DXO Logo
At the Image Sensor 2008 conference in San Diego, DxO Labs today unveils DXO Mark, a new website delivering key objective metrics of sensor performance for a variety of cameras measured directly on the RAW image. Available as a free online resource, DXO Mark makes it possible for the first time to assess the intrinsic quality of a camera before the impact of any RAW conversion.

There are many valuable resources reviewing the image quality of digital cameras, but none of them consider the actual RAW signal straight from the camera sensor,” explains Nicolas Touchard, Vice President of Marketing, DxO Labs Image Quality Evaluation business. “Demanding photographers who shoot in RAW should only care about the genuine quality of the RAW image, yet until now they have had to rely on measures based on converted RAW images, obviously biased by the processing applied to them, whether embedded or performed offline with a software RAW converter. Furthermore, as RAW converters evolve and improve, the latent potential of RAW images can only be gauged by analyzing the RAW images themselves, projecting the potential quality achievable with the ultimate RAW converter. This is why we believe that our approach will dramatically change the way photographers evaluate digital cameras.

DXO Mark provides in-depth measurements of all the relevant characteristics of a sensor: actual ISO sensitivity (which generally differs from the value reported by the camera), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), dynamic range, tonal range, color depth and sensitivity, metamerism, etc. DXO Mark already covers 50 popular cameras, including Digital Single-Lens Reflex (DSLRs) and high-end bridge cameras offering RAW image format. The site will be updated on a regular basis with new cameras.

DXO Mark RAW image quality database relies on DxO Analyzer, the world’s leading turn-key laboratory solution for image quality evaluation. Thanks to its accuracy, completeness, and reliability, DxO Analyzer has become the reference tool for numerous leading imaging industry players, photography magazines and websites.

DxOMark Sensor, a simple scale for Raw image quality
DxOMark Sensor aggregates DXO Mark’s large and complex set of measures into a simple scale, allowing for easy comparison between camera performances. The DxOMark Sensor scale is designed to map to real world photographic scenarios such as portrait, landscape and action photography, ensuring that the scale is relevant to photographers.

DxOMark Sensor is naturally an open scale, as it will need to cope with performance improvements driven by the evolution of sensor technologies.

DXO Mark Insights, the view of an insider
To help understand the ramifications of such a new tool, and to assist those who want to take advantage of the RAW image quality database, DXO Mark features a number of technical papers, collectively referred to as “Insights,” written by DxO Labs scientists. These technical articles aim in particular to give an original perspective on the technology challenges faced by the imaging industry.

Early Insights include a paper on how pixel count impacts noise, providing an unexpected yet well-supported contribution to this controversial topic, along with an analysis of the evolution of camera sensor performance over the past few years.

The Insights section will be updated on a regular basis with more technical papers.

A free resource for photography journalists and experts
Accessible for free to visitors, DXO Mark has in fact been designed to serve the imaging community, and more precisely the photo press. Photography journalists and experts can now complement their analyses and reviews with an evaluation of the intrinsic performance of cameras, regardless of optics or processing considerations.

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Comments


User_Removed 10 17.9k 8 Norway
17 Nov 2008 2:55PM
Interesting. Using their facilities and data, I have compared my D200 against a D300 and D700. The only real 'upgrade' from my D200 is the D700... The differences >< the 200/300 are neglible.

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BOB S 12 2.6k
17 Nov 2008 3:01PM

Quote:First digital camera benchmark based on RAW image quality - Created by leading image science company DxO Labs, this free online resource delivers in-depth, objective RAW-based image quality data to enable fair analysis and comparison of digital cameras.



Why dont we have a look and see if they take nice pictures instead of analysisng the fun out of photography, one of the problems of the digital age.

BOB
elowes 10 2.8k United Kingdom
17 Nov 2008 3:29PM
Have to agree. What does it really mean to the end user
baxter 10 164 England
17 Nov 2008 4:03PM
This sounds great news to me.

It means open source data presented in what ought to be an unbiased manner. Thus it should provide a far more informed choice to any potential camera change. How many 5D owners are currently wondering how much better the Mk II will be, and what this will bring to their pictures? Mike has already indicated the usefulness in assessing a potential change of camera body.

The photographer on the street now has access to decent data before the photo-mag journalists add their spin, thereby ensuring that the camera manufacturers repeat their advertising within the publication.

In addition, lots of the noise/misinformed opinion proffered in web-forums can be ignored. Having decided type of shooting the camera is needed for, the mix of properties can be determined, then the candidates can be seen plotted against each other.

Yes the D700 does do well at the moment.

DxO have a fair degree of credibility, so I hope that they try to retain this and build on this commendable initiative.
baxter 10 164 England
17 Nov 2008 4:37PM
This sounds great news to me.

It means open source data presented in what ought to be an unbiased manner. Thus it should provide a far more informed choice to any potential camera change. How many 5D owners are currently wondering how much better the Mk II will be, and what this will bring to their pictures? Mike has already indicated the usefulness in assessing a potential change of camera body.

The photographer on the street now has access to decent data before the photo-mag journalists add their spin, thereby ensuring that the camera manufacturers repeat their advertising within the publication.

In addition, lots of the noise/misinformed opinion proffered in web-forums can be ignored. Having decided type of shooting the camera is needed for, the mix of properties can be determined, then the candidates can be seen plotted against each other.

Yes the D700 does do well at the moment.

DxO have a fair degree of credibility, so I hope that they try to retain this and build on this commendable initiative.
User_Removed 10 17.9k 8 Norway
19 Nov 2008 11:34AM
Their data is really worth an in-depth look.

For example, (notwithstanding the differences that a CMOS chip brings to the party over a CCD chip) the ISO ratings on the D300 are actually a lot lower than the actual selected value on the camera would have one believe. The D200 is almost 'on the money' right across the ISO range whilst the D300 is markedly 'off'. Dynamic range also make for very interesting reading as does the Tonal Range data.

I'm sticking with my D200! Thanks DxO! Wink
mattmatic 10 598
19 Nov 2008 5:10PM
How odd - comparing three cameras that I've worked with RAW data from (Pentax K20D, K10D & Canon 30D) the results on DxO Mark seem to disagree with my experience... for example it implies almost zero difference between K20D & K10D - but that's not what I've found in the real world of images. Oh well, must be me at fault Tongue
Interesting though Wink
Matt

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