Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


PRIZES GALORE! Enter The ePHOTOzine Exclusive Christmas Prize Draw; Over £10,000 Worth of Prizes! Plus A Gift For Everybody On Christmas Day!

Guide to camera holders

Guide to camera holders - 

 Add Comment

Category : Bags, Cases and Straps
Share :

The world of camera bags, cases and equipment carriers.
Words Peter Bargh

Keeping your camera safe is one thing, but comfort when carrying equipment is another. In this guide we look at all the options available in the world of camera carriers.

Why you'd use a camera case or holdall
Protective
One of the main reasons is to protect the camera equipment. Some photographers have been known to drop their camera and a few lenses in a used plastic shopping carrier bag. The gear is left to rattle around in the bottom. You wouldn't be surprised that after a few trips it would be looking decidedly tatty.

Carrying in the field
It's also far more convenient when you're out on your travels to have all the essential items in one place and easy to access.

Store items
Some use a holdall to keep everything stored in when it's at home or business. It can then be stored in the bottom of the wardrobe, spare room or loft when not needed.

Be organised
A bag allows you to keep items organised so you know where to find them. Having filters in a pouch at the front, batteries in a side compartment and flash under the main section makes it easier to locate these with speed.
It's worth photographing everything in place for insurance purposes too.

Easy of transport
If the case is protective it can be used for transportation. A strong case will ensure the gear travels in the cargo of a plane or in the boot of a car.

There are a loads of options when it comes to storing, carrying and transporting gear and below is your snap shot guide to each method with advantages and disadvantages of each.

Camera holdall
The most popular choice for photographers with an incredible choice of brands and styles. You can go for funky colourful numbers or more sedate greys and blacks. Basic ones have just an inner section while more advanced models have outer pockets and extra compartments in and around the bag. Features to consider include tripod straps, net pockets for easier viewing, cradle inner dividers, material used, carry handle. Buy one that's big enough for all the kit you have now with a bit of spare space for future items, but be aware that you could carry items around that you never use, So plan the content carefully.

Guide to camera holders

Backpack
The choice of landscape and travel photographers. Used like a conventional backpack only this one will be full of all your valuable camera goodies. Secure compartments are essential so the inners don't collapse when it's in use. Also check for quality padded back and adjustable straps for comfort. Tripod straps may be included also hoops to attach accessory pouches. One with two compartments is better for long distance treks as you can store food and clothing in one and camera gear in the other. Weatherproof material is essential.

Guide to camera holders

Ever Ready case
There was a time when everyone carried their cameras in these cases. The name ever ready is so called because the case fits snugly around the camera, but the top hinges over and falls below the camera so you can take a photo and then cover the camera again. Usually made of leather or high quality imitation these are very protective and compact but expensive and not practical if you also have a spare lens or flash to consider. A zoomster is a better option.

Guide to camera holders

Pouch case
Sold in a wide variety of shapes these compact cases hold one camera and maybe a compact flash or few films. Most have padding and a belt loop to attach around your waist using your trousers belt. They are available for SLR cameras, lenses and compact cameras and can also be used for mobile phones larger flashguns and other similar items.

Guide to camera holders

Aluminium case
These type of cases are usually silver or coated in black (sometimes coloured version can be found). Beware of cheap ones which are often made of compressed card with a fine coating to make them look more durable and metal. The real aluminium cases can be stood on to gain height in a crowd and offer excellent protection. The interior is usually either diced foam or has grooved adjustable partitions. They are often heavier than holdalls and not as comfortable to carry over a shoulder. They also look more expensive so can be tempting for thieves.

Guide to camera holders

Zoomster
A very popular option in various depths to take different length lenses. Some have a long snout with a partition halfway down where an extra lens can be held. Some have adjustable partitions and a front pocket for filters and film. Look for one with a belt loop, carry handle and shoulder strap for maximum versatility. Avoid ones with the zip access across the top as this is not very protective against rain

Guide to camera holders

Photographers vest
Made popular by photojournalists, sports and fashion photographers this waistcoat style piece of clothing has a multitude of pockets of varying size and depth. The idea is you can stash film, lenses, camera bodies, exposure meters, filters and flash guns around your body to give an even distribution of weight and make it easy to carry. They also allow quick access when you're in a hurry, providing you remember which pocket holds what! It's the gadget carrier's dream. I bet James Bond has one!

Guide to camera holders

Waterproof case
Specialist camera cases made by just a few companies have O-ring waterproof seals so the case can be submerged in water. The inners have padded adjustable partitions or foam and they come in various dimensions to suit small or large outfits. Expensive, but essential for the rugged travel, industrial or location photographer.

Guide to camera holders

Cycle bag
New style of bag with the fashionable cross over chest style strap that makes it better to use while cycling. These bags hug to the body so you can whizz around without it swinging all over the place.

Guide to camera holders

Tripod case
A tripod is a cumbersome item so it makes sense to bag it. Many cases are available for varying lengths of tripod. Most have a shoulder strap and carrying handle.

Guide to camera holders

Lens case
Compact pouches to hold lenses. Take your lens into the shop when buying one to make sure it fits snugly and is big enough to cover the lens and close properly. Ones with belt loops can be carried easily others add protection for the plastic bag approach to equipment carrying!

Guide to camera holders

Raincover
Not a case as such but worthy of a mention. These hoods wrap around the camera while it's on a tripod and offer protection against the rain. They enclose the lens and camera body and have an opening that you look through to see the viewfinder.

Guide to camera holders

Belt bag
A camera holdall that's shaped to your waist and has a built in wide belt for comfortable waist carriage. Better designed ones have the lid opening away from you so it's easier to access the gear inside.

Guide to camera holders

Who's who in bags and cases

MakesGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders
Aluminium Case Co    Guide to camera holders       
Aquatech          Guide to camera holders 
Benbo        Guide to camera holders   
BillinghamGuide to camera holders Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders  
CCSGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders Guide to camera holders
CentonGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders      Guide to camera holders   
CobraGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders   Guide to camera holders   
CrumplerGuide to camera holders Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders   Guide to camera holders Guide to camera holders Guide to camera holders
DomkeGuide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders Guide to camera holders   
Ewa-Marine          Guide to camera holders 
Gitzo        Guide to camera holders   
HakubaGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders   Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  
HamaGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders     
JessopGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders   Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  
KiplingGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders        
LoweproGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders Guide to camera holders
Manfrotto        Guide to camera holders   
OpTech  Guide to camera holders      Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders 
OysterGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders Guide to camera holders    Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  
Pelican     Guide to camera holders      
SamsoniteGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders    Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  
SealTight     Guide to camera holders      
TenbaGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders 
TamracGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders  Guide to camera holders Guide to camera holdersGuide to camera holders Guide to camera holders
Underwater Kinetics     Guide to camera holders      
Vanguard    Guide to camera holders   Guide to camera holders   
Velbon        Guide to camera holders   
Zero Halliburton    Guide to camera holders       
Zing  Guide to camera holders      Guide to camera holders  
             

Explore More

Join ePHOTOzine and remove these ads.

There are no comments here! Be the first!


Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.