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Macro Photography In The Woods

Macro Photography In The Woods - Emma takes a trip to some local woods with the 35mm macro lens.

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Category : Photographic Subjects
Product : Pentax HD PENTAX-DA 35mm f/2.8 Macro Limited
Price : £469
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HD Pentax DA 35mm Macro Limited (4)

I recently received a new addition for my Pentax K-50 - a Pentax DA 35mm f/2.8 macro lens

Macro has always been one of my favourite types of photography because I love how you can portray all the intimate details of objects by getting in close. I am also a fan of shallow depth of field, so I couldn't wait to get out and take some macro shots with this lens.

FrostThe shallow depth of field here really makes the frosty fungi jump from the image. © Emma Kay

The 35mm is a limited lens, and is made from aluminium, so it feels really solid. The focusing ring is well damped, too, making it ideal for the fine adjustments needed for macro photography. It also has a built in hood that slides in when not needed. 
 
I set the camera to manual focus mode (there is a dedicated switch on the side of the camera for this, making it easy to switch back at any time) and I used manual mode, at the widest aperture of f/2.8. 

We headed out to Whitwell woods in Derbyshire to see what I could capture in a woodland environment. Woods are great places for macro nature photography as many of the objects there, trees, fungi, leaves, bark, beetles and creatures all have tiny details which can be emphasised through a macro image.

I had a few issues with images coming out a little bright and overexposed to begin with due to the wide aperture but this was quickly rectified by making the shutter speed faster. The K-50 makes adjustments like this really easy, and in manual mode the scroller on the front controls the shutter speed, and the one on the back the aperture, making it easy to get the image exactly how you want it to be exposed.

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