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Nero Multi Trigger Review

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Category: Remote Releases
Product: Nero Multi Trigger
Price: £150.00
Rating: 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

Nero Multi Trigger Test - The Nero Multi Trigger delivers a range of ten remote control options for photographers to capture photographs triggered by sound, movement or light. Peter Bargh prepares for a voyage into the unseen.

Posted:
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Edit 04/03/2103 - Following this review Nero took note of our feedback regarding the negative aspects of the Nero Multi Trigger and have completely rebuilt it. We have reviewed the new version here: Nero Trigger

Features
Handling
Performance
Verdict
Specification

The Nero Multi-Trigger is a neat looking device that has light, sound and laser sensors to trigger the camera remotely. It can be used to photography lightning or make long exposures or time lapse photographs, as well as record exploding or fast moving subjects. It's available to fit the following camera systems Nikon (MC-30), Nikon (MC-DC1), Nikon (MC-DC2), Sony (A Series). Canon (RS-80N3) and the
Canon (2.5 mm) tested here using Pentax SLRs.

Nero Multi Trigger

Nero Multi Trigger Features

The Nero Trigger is available in two forms - one a Lightning trigger and the other, tested here, offers Lightning as well as nine other modes. It's a plastic construction with a bright yellow fascia. This fascia has what looks like touch pad buttons, but they are just icons. Had they been touch buttons it would have been like one of the modern studio flash heads or similar to an old Wasp Synthesiser I owned back in the 80s.

Nero Multi Trigger Left

The controls are around the side. The left side features the on /off switch with a 3.5mm jack socket for flash and 2.5mm jack socket for DSLR connection cables. DSLR? What if I have an advanced compact or maybe, perish the thought, a film camera? It will still work, but Nero are missing a trick excluding photographers with sophisticated compacts and compact system cameras... and film cameras. Change the label to "Camera" to avoid any confusion.

Nero Multi Trigger Right

On the right side is what appears to be a volume control and two buttons marked C and M.
The volume control is actually a sensitivity wheel, while the C is used to change the function and M to change the mode? Confused? You will be!

Key Features

  • Lightning Trigger
  • Sound Trigger
  • Sound Trigger with Lock
  • Time Lapse (1-10 secs)
  • Time Lapse (1-10 mins)
  • Laser Trigger with Delay
  • Laser Trigger with MultiShot
  • Long Exposure
  • Super Bulb
  • Manuel Trigger

Nero Multi Trigger Handling

The Trigger is powered by two AAA batteries. You need to unscrew four screws and take the unit apart to access batteries, which is a bit of a pain if they go flat while you're on location. It large and swamps the hot shoe area of the camera.

Nero Multi Trigger On Camera

With that in mind you'd expect the controls to be large or easy to use. They may be easy to set, but you have no idea, without the user manual, what you are setting. You press the M button to set a mode and then use the sensitivity dial or C button to run through the functions. The setting is indicated using bright LEDs that are easy to see in low light, but the scale markings aren't, so you may be able to tell when you're at the extremes of 1 or 10 but not 5 or 7. Also without the manual (or a good memory) you don't know which mode or value the LED scale is set at.

Other than that, it feels well built and will cope with the odd knock or two. And refinements have been made to the hot shoe which apparently was quite crude in early samples sent out for review, but now offers a solid fastening to the camera shoe so it won't slip off easily. It's not much use for Sony users though!

One issue with handling is the on / off switch which is easily caught and switched on. As there's no auto off you could find the batteries flat if you accidentally switch on when storing away in a bag or case.

Nero Multi Trigger LED Nero Multi Trigger Modes
Left: This scale indicates the value of the mode being used, set here at level 2.
Right: indicates the mode being used - in this photo it's Mode 4 - the Timelapse Trigger.

Nero Multi Trigger Performance

Unlike some competitor products the Nero Multi-trigger doesn't come with a laser so you need to buy one to use the two laser trigger modes - Laser Trigger with Delay and Laser Trigger with MultiShot. I had a laser pen that worked. You line up the beam with the sensor and the LED flashes briefly to indicate the position is correct. Then you adjust the sensitivity dial so that the camera fires with a slight delay giving enough time for the moving subject to pass through the beam and reach the centre of the frame. This requires trial and error using the LED scale to adjust between 0-50 millisecond delay and 400-500 millisecond delay.

You will need mini tripods or similar support for the trigger and the pen. The TriggerSmart we reviewed recently comes with all the bits you need, as does another new device called PhotoTrigger that we will be reviewing soon.

There's a built in light and audio sensor so the Lightning Trigger, Sound Trigger and Sound Trigger with Lock all work and sensitivity is adjust using the scale which goes from least sensitive to most sensitive. Again it's all trial and error. I tried recording a party popper and a bursting balloon filled with water and one with a small amount of flour added. It worked fine for the loud popper bang and empty balloon burst but didn't pick up the sound of a balloon filled with water popping as the sound was quieter. The TriggerSmart worked better for this. I'm please with the shots I got of the loud exploding items though.

Balloon with a small amount of flour inserted | 10 sec | f/22.0 | 74.0 mm | ISO 200
Balloon with a small amount of flour inserted | 10 sec | f/22.0 | 74.0 mm | ISO 200

Popper with a small amount of flour inserted | 39 sec | f/16.0 | 37.0 mm | ISO 200
Popper with a small amount of flour inserted | 39 sec | f/16.0 | 37.0 mm | ISO 200

The Time Lapse is spilt into two modes - one with 1-10 secs and one with 1-10 mins. A good feature of this is you can adjust the setting while it's active. So you could do five frames at 1 sec apart and then scroll up to 10 seconds for the rest of the sequence.

What you can't do that's really useful is combine modes, so with time lapse on a cheap remote control I bought on eBay I could set it to a five hour delay so the time lapse sequence would start recording in the early hours of the morning. You also cannot set the number you want. This is useful for star trail photography where you may want a 120 shot sequence. You can do that on many products, including the Hahnel Giga T Pro II.

The Long Exposure mode is useful for those using Big Stoppers and similar 10x ND filters. This has settings from 30sec, which is not really needed as most cameras have this setting, up to 4 hours. It's easy to end up needing a 30min exposure when a Big Stopper is used with a small aperture. I've never needed a 4 hour exposure though!

The Super Bulb mode will just lock the shutter open indefinitely so you can be more precise than the long exposure mode and set 3min 45 seconds. or 50 hours if you want!  You need some other device to time this though.

And final Manual Trigger will trigger the camera a number of times in sequence from 1 to 10x. Well that's what it should do! Our review sample shot three frames when the indicator was on 3 or 4, and only managed seven frames when the marker was on 10x. A second attempt and it worked fine. After a few more trials it seems a bit erratic! Also when the cable is plugged into the camera you can't half press on the shutter button to activate the display or set focus as the camera fires on half pressure.

This is a sequence taken with the camera shutter at 1/400sec and the Nero Multi-trigger set to manual trigger mode and ten frames.

Nero Trigger Stopwatch 1 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 1
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 2 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 2
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 3 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 1
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 4 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 4
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 5 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 5
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 6 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 6
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 7 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 7
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 8 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 8
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 9 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 9
Nero Trigger Stopwatch 10 | 1/400 sec | ISO 400
Frame 10
   

Value For Money

The Multi-Trigger is $199 (est £150). That's quite lot for a device that doesn't have some of the necessary extras to make aspects work such as laser and Mini Tripod Stands. However when you buy a unit with all this included like the TriggerSmart, the cost can be much higher at around £230. Hahnel's Giga T Pro II is a better device for time-lapse and long exposure at just £80 but lacks the sound and laser triggering. So as an all round unit the Multi-Trigger is decent value, but another unit we're about to test, called the PhotoTrigger seems better value at £129 with all the necessary extras included (apart from batteries!).

Nero Multi Trigger Verdict

The Nero Multi-Trigger looks good and does have a wide range of modes. I like the compact size in comparison to the TriggerSmart and the fact you don't have to have lots of wires and a huge controller box. The downside is that you can't tell what mode you're in unless you know the unit well.

An LCD is called for, and is something that's on the PhotoTrigger that we will be testing soon - the Photo Trigger also has easy change battery chamber! I've been shooting a few star trails recently and this unit isn't as good to use as the Hahnel Gig T Pro II, it also doesn't appear as senstive or accurate as the TriggerSmart so it's a bit of a jack of all trades, master of none. It would be fine if there weren't other options available, but this part of photography is finally starting to get lots of attention and some really interesting gadgets are appearing.

Nero Multi Trigger Pros

Solid build
LEDs bright
Versatile range of modes

Nero Multi Trigger Cons

Scales position hard to see in low light
Instruction manual or good memory needed
Scale not working effectivly
Modes cannot be used in combination
On/off switch easy to catch and switch on
Batteries not easy to change

FEATURES  
HANDLING  
PERFORMANCE  
VALUE FOR MONEY  
VERDICT  

Nero Multi Trigger Specifications

Dimensions
Weight 90g
Width 61mm
Height 34mm
Depth 86mm

View Full Product Details

 



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