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Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM-D E-M5 Comparison Review

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM-D E-M5 Comparison Review - We put the Panasonic Lumix GX7 up against the Olympus OM-D E-M5 - two premium Micro Four Thirds cameras with built-in electronic viewfinder.

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Category : Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera
Product : Panasonic Lumix GX7
Price : £819
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Features
Handling
Performance
Verdict
Specification
Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM D E M5 (2)

When introduced, the Panasonic Lumix GX7 came with some bold claims, including better noise performance than the Olympus OM-D E-M5. As these two cameras are available at a similar price, and have a similar set of features, such as 9fps continuous shooting, build in electronic viewfinder, and built in image stabilisation, we thought it would be worth comparing the two models to find out which is best.

Read the full Panasonic Lumix GX7 Review
Read the full Olympus OM-D E-M5 Review


Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM-D E-M5 Features

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM D E M5 (5)

The Panasonic Lumix GX7 and Olympus OM-D E-M5 share a number of key features, they are both Micro Four Thirds cameras, with a 16 megapixel sensor, 9fps continuous shooting, 3inch tilting screen, and they both have a built-in electronic viewfinder. Here similarities diminish, with the GX7 featuring a tilting EVF and built-in pop up flash with rangefinder styling, while the OM-D E-M5 does not feature a flash, but does have a weather sealed body and Digital SLR stlying with a raised area for the viewfinder and flash hot-shoe.

Both cameras feature in body image stabilisation, with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 featuring the impressive 5-axis image stabilisation, while the Panasonic Lumix GX7, features 2-axis sensor shift image stabilisation, instead suggesting that lens based optical image stabilisation is preferable if available.


Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM D E M5 (1)

Key Features Comparison Table:


Olympus OM-D E-M5   Panasonic Lumix GX7
16.1 megapixel sensor   16 megapixel sensor
5-axis image stabilisation - up to 5EV   Image Sensor Shift Type (2-axis)
3 inch OLED 610k dot tilting touch-screen   3 inch 1040k dot tilting touch-screen
9fps, 4.2fps continuous shooting with AF   9fps (electronic), 5.3fps mechanical, 4.2fps continuous AF
1/4000s mechanical shutter   1/8000s mechanical shutter
1/180s x-sync external flash, 1/250s attached   1/320 second
Full HD, MPEG4 MOV, 720p MJPEG, 30p   Full HD, AVCHD, MP4, 50/25/24p
Stereo mics, accessory port for microphone etc   Stereo mic
ISO range 200-25600 (Lowest ISO200)   ISO range 125-25600 (extends to low 125)
N/A   Focus peaking
2 axis electronic spirit level   2 axis electronic spirit level
2 Function buttons (dedicated)   4 physical function buttons
1.44 million dot EVF
Field of view Approx. 100%
Max. 1.15x with a 50mm lens set to infinity at -1 dioptre
18mm at -1 dioptre from eyepiece lens
-4.0 to +2.0 diopters
  2.764 million dot tilting EVF
Field of view Approx. 100%
Approx. 1.39x / 0.7x (35mm camera equivalent) with 50mm lens at infinity; -1.0 m -1
Approx.17.5mm from eyepiece lens
-4.0 to +3.0 diopters
N/A   Wi-Fi built-in / NFC
External flash included (Guide 10, ISO200)   Built-in pop-up flash (GN7.0 equivalent, ISO 200)
Weather sealed body, battery grip available (adds function buttons)   N/A
330 shot battery life
 
  320 shot battery life (with H-H020A),
350 shots with 14-42mm
Weight: 425g (SD card, Battery, Body)   Weight: 402g (SD card, Battery, Body)
Size: 121 x 89.6 x 41.9mm   122.6 x 70.7 x 43.3mm
Body only: £795 (RRP £999)   Body only: £819 (RRP £819)


If you want some of the more advanced features of the GX7 in an Olympus camera then you would need to look at the Olympus PEN E-P5, with 5-axis IS, ISO100-25600, focus peaking, Wi-Fi built-in, built-in pop up flash (GN 10), 400 shot battery life, 9fps continuous shooting, 5fps continuous AF, 1/8000s shutter speed, 3inch 1037k dot touch screen, and a slightly smaller body. The Olympus PEN E-P5 doesn't feature a built-in electronic viewfinder, however, the VF-4 is available and is a tilting electronic viewfinder with impressive specifications.

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM-D E-M5 Handling

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM D E M5 (8)

The two cameras are roughly the same weight, with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 coming in at slightly heavier. It's also slightly smaller in width and depth, although taller in the middle due to the raised flash hot-shoe. The Panasonic Lumix GX7 manages an impressive feat putting a tilting EVF, flash hot-shoe, and pop up flash all in the top plate, as well as a control wheel around the shutter release.

The GX7 has a large front rubberised grip, that extends around to the back. The front grip on the OM-D slightly lacking with a textured pattern, but it is not rubberised, although the optional battery grip helps here, as well as the protruding rubber grip at the back.

Both cameras feature metal bodies, although the Olympus OM-D E-M5 with weather sealed body does feel slightly stronger, with a weather sealed battery cover and side memory card slot compared to the plastic battery / memory cover on the GX7. 
Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM D E M5 (7)

The EVF on the GX7 is a 16:9 aspect ratio unit, and promises 100% color reproduction in Adobe RGB, with a resolution of 2764k dots. The E-M5 electronic viewfinder has a 4:3 aspect ratio, 1.44 million dots (SVGA), and is made by Epson.

The GX7 screen tilts to the same amount as the OM-D E-M5 both up and down, although the GX7 is thinner in comparison. The Q. Menu on the Panasonic gives quick access to a number of useful settings, making it easy to change setting.

On the Olympus you press the OK button to get an overlaid view of settings that you can scroll through. To access a "Super Control Panel" to get quick access to settings you have to enable this feature in the menus, and even then it isn't always so easy to access.

The full Panasonic menus are clearly laid out and easy to navigate. Unfortunately the same can't be said for Olympus menus, which by default show a fairly basic set of options. To get the full set of menus you need to enable the custom menus then you get several pages of options.

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM D E M5 (9)

Battery life - The GX7 offers up to 320 shots with the with 20mm lens or 350 shots with the 14-42mm lens. The Olympus OM-D E-M5 offers 330 shots, with both cameras battery life being quite short compared to the 400 shots offered by the Olympus PEN E-P5.

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM D E M5 (10)

Speed - We took a number of shots to test the camera's responsiveness, from switch on to first photo, shot to shot, focusing speed etc. We take a number of shots and then use the average to ensure accurate and consistent tests, making it easy to compare with other cameras.
 

  Panasonic Lumix GX7 Olympus OM-D E-M5
Shutter Response 0.05 <0.05
Wide - Focus / Shutter Response 0.175 0.125
Full zoom - Focus / Shutter Response 0.175 0.2
Switch on Time to Taking a Photo 1.1 1.0
Shot to Shot without flash 0.4 0.3-0.4
Shot to Shot with Flash 1.0 1.5
Continuous Shooting - JPEG
(shots before slow down)
5.3fps (63 shots)
9fps electronic (24 shots)
9fps (19 shots)
 
Continuous Shooting - Flash N/A 1.4s
Continuous Shooting - RAW 5fps (10 shots) 9fps (16 shots)

Quicker RAW shooting with the OM-D, as well as the mechanical shutter being able to shoot at 9fps, while the GX7 needs to be switched to the electronic shutter before 9fps is possible.

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM-D E-M5 Performance

Here is a comparison of ISO and white balance images taken on both the Panasonic Lumix GX7 and Olympus OM-D E-M5. Click "High-Res" to view the full size originals. Additional sample photos and product shots are available in the Panasonic Lumix GX7 Review, and Olympus OM-D E-M5 Review.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 ISO test images


Panasonic Lumix GX7 ISO test images


The GX7 ISO range goes from ISO200 to ISO25600, and the lowest ISO setting can be extended to ISO125, while the OM-D E-M5 goes from ISO200 to ISO25600 with no lower ISO setting available. Shown below are 100% actual pixels crops from the ISO images.

ISO200 Comparison

Compared to the Olympus OM-D E-M5, the GX7 images at ISO125 and ISO200 show smoother results, with slightly less grain visible, although the E-M5 shows more fine detail. Noise results at ISO400, ISO800, and ISO1600 are very similar, however with the E-M5 retaining slightly more fine detail. This is the case at ISO3200, where noise results are very similar, although there is a slightly higher level of noise in mid greys from the GX7.

ISO6400 Comparison

Again at ISO6400 results are very similar, with both cameras smudging detail. At ISO12800 image quality from the E-M5 deteriorates, and at ISO25600 the images from the GX7 show better results, although the highest ISO setting on both cameras is best avoided if at all possible. We shot the GX7 images using manual white balance, as the camera struggled with white balance under mixed lighting.

ISO25600 Comparison

Olympus OM-D E-M5 White-balance test images


Panasonic Lumix GX7 White-balance test images


The Olympus OM-D E-M5 (and other Olympus m43 cameras, and some compacts) features an option to "Keep Warm WB" under tungsten lighting - this keeps a warm image, but with this switched off gives extremely accurate white balance results, with better results than the GX7 under tungsten light. There is not a massive difference between the cameras under fluorescent lighting, although the OM-D E-M5 does deliver more neutral results.

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Olympus OM-D E-M5
Wide | 1/500 sec | f/8.0 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
Wide | 1/500 sec | f/8.0 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
Olympus OM D E M5 Vs GX7 Wide P8080165 | 1/400 sec | f/9.0 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
Wide | 1/400 sec | f/9.0 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
20mm II | 1/1000 sec | f/5.0 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
20mm II | 1/1000 sec | f/5.0 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
Olympus OM D E M5 Vs GX7 20mm P8080169 | 1/1000 sec | f/6.3 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
20mm | 1/1000 sec | f/6.3 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
Zoom | 1/400 sec | f/10.0 | 42.0 mm | ISO 200
Zoom | 1/400 sec | f/10.0 | 42.0 mm | ISO 200
Olympus OM D E M5 Vs GX7 42mm P8080167 | 1/400 sec | f/11.0 | 42.0 mm | ISO 200
42mm | 1/400 sec | f/11.0 | 42.0 mm | ISO 200
Structure | 1/400 sec | f/7.1 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
Structure | 1/400 sec | f/7.1 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
Olympus OM D E M5 Vs Gx7 14mm P8080171 | 1/320 sec | f/7.1 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
Structure | 1/320 sec | f/7.1 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
Thoresby Hall | 1/400 sec | f/9.0 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
Hall | 1/400 sec | f/9.0 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
Olympus OM D E M5 Vs GX7 Hall P8080184 | 1/160 sec | f/13.0 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
Hall | 1/160 sec | f/13.0 | 20.0 mm | ISO 200
   

For these shots we used the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42mm II lens, as well as the Panasonic Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 II lens. The Olympus OM-D E-M5 images show slightly stronger contrast, as well as slightly sharper results straight out of the camera, as well as a slightly darker exposure for most of the shots.

Value For Money

The Panasonic Lumix GX7 is introduced with a body only price of £819. The Olympus OM-D E-M5, after being out for over a year is available for just under £800 body only. This puts both cameras into the premium mirrorless camera price bracket, and they are up against the Olympus PEN E-P5, Fujifilm X-Pro1, Samsung NX20 and Samsung Galaxy NX, as well as the Sony NEX-6 and NEX-7.

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Vs Olympus OM-D E-M5 Verdict

Both the Panasonic Lumix GX7 and Olympus OM-D E-M5 are capable of shooting extremely high quality images, delivering sharp results with low noise levels, as well as excellent colour. While the cameras use different sensors, with Panasonic using their own sensor, and the Olympus OM-D E-M5 using a Sony sensor, they both produce similar levels of noise, with a slight benefit going to the GX7 at the highest ISO settings of ISO12800 and ISO25600.

With them both capable of delivering excellent image quality, high speed shooting, and fast focus, it comes down to what features you are looking for in a camera, as to which would be best for you. For example, if you are regularly shooting outdoors, then the weather sealed OM-D E-M5 will be best suited to you. If however you like the idea of using a tilting EVF, and want the latest Wi-Fi connectivity features, then the Panasonic Lumix GX7 would make an excellent choice, particularly if you would benefit from focus peaking for manual focus lenses.

If you shoot video, the GX7 has more options and settings as well as a full range of frame speeds, however as the in-body image stabilisation isn't active in video mode, you would be best investing in optically stabilised lenses. The Olympus OM-D E-M5, with 5-axis image stabilisation, does an excellent job at stabilising the video, regardless of what lens is on the front. Choosing between the two is an extremely tough choice, as the cameras are extremely closely matched, and I think it would be difficult to be disappointed with either of them.

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Pros:

Tilting EVF
Great screen
Focus Peaking
Wi-Fi built-in
Improved ISO performance
 

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Pros:

Livetime, livebulb mode
Weather sealed
5-axis image stabilisation
Excellent JPEG output, WB options
Very quiet shutter
 

Panasonic Lumix GX7 Cons:

Loud mechanical shutter - electronic available
In body IS not available in video mode

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Cons:

Olympus menu system
Front grip


Read the full Panasonic Lumix GX7 Review
Read the full Olympus OM-D E-M5 Review


Comparison Table

Panasonic Lumix GX7Olympus OM-D E-M5
ManufacturerPanasonicOlympus
Image Sensor
CCD pixels16Mp (Megapixels)16.1Mp (Megapixels)
Pixels (W)45924608
Pixels (H)34483456
Sensor TypeLive MOS SensorLive MOS Sensor
Sensor SizeMicro / Four ThirdsMicro / Four Thirds
Sensor Size (width)17.3mm17.3mm
Sensor Size (height)13mm13mm
Aspect Ratio
  • 4:3
  • 3:2
  • 16:9
  • 1:1
  • 4:3
  • 3:2
  • 16:9
  • 1:1
LCD Monitor
LCD Monitor3in3in
Screen resolution1040k dots610k dots
Touch ScreenYesYes
Focusing
Focusing modes
  • Autofocus
  • Manual
  • Spot
  • Face Detection
  • AF Tracking
  • Multi
  • Centre
  • Touch AF
  • Autofocus
  • Manual
  • Face Detection
  • AF Tracking
  • Touch AF
  • Spot
  • Multi
Exposure Control
Shutter speeds shortest1/8000sec1/4000sec
Shutter speeds longest60sec60sec
Exp modes
  • Program
  • Aperture-Priority
  • Shutter-Priority
  • Manual
  • Scene modes
  • Program Variable
  • Program
  • Aperture-Priority
  • Shutter-Priority
  • Manual
  • Scene modes
Metering
  • Centre-weighted - Average
  • Multi Pattern
  • Centre Spot
  • Centre-weighted - Average
  • Multi Pattern
  • Spot
ISO sensitivity125 - 25600200 - 25600
White balance
  • Auto
  • Manual
  • Outdoors/Daylight
  • Incandescent
  • Cloudy
  • Shade
  • Flash
  • Auto
  • Manual
  • Incandescent
  • Fluorescent
  • Outdoors/Daylight
  • Cloudy
  • Shade
  • Flash
  • Underwater
Exposure Comp+/-5+/-3
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Resolution2764k dots1.44million dots
Shooting Options
Continuous shooting9fps9fps
Video
Movie modeYesYes
Video Resolution
  • 1920x1080
  • 1280x720 720p
  • 1920x1080
  • 1280x720 720p
  • 640x480 VGA
Video FPS60/50/25/24p30
Stereo SoundYesYes
Optical Zoom with VideoYesYes
Other Features
Image StabilisationYesYes
Interface
HDMIYesYes
USBUSB 2USB 2
Storage
Card Type
  • SD
  • SDHC
  • SDXC
  • SD
  • SDHC
  • SDXC
File Type
  • RAW
  • JPG
  • RAW + JPG
  • RAW
  • JPG
  • RAW + JPG
Power Source
Battery TypeLithium-Ion BatteryLithium Ion
CIPA Rating320330
Box Contents
Box ContentsDigital camera, Body cap, Lens, Lens hood, Lens Cap, Lens rear cap, Battery pack, Battery charger, USB connection cable, CD-ROM, Shoulder strap, Hot shoe cover, operating instructions.Body, Flash FL-LM2, Li-ion battery BLN-1, Li-ion battery charger BCN-1, USB/Video Multi cable, Shoulder strap, OLYMPUS Viewer 2/ib CD-ROM, Instruction manual, Warranty card
Dimensions
Weight402g373g
Width122.6mm121mm
Height70.7mm89.6mm
Depth43.3mm41.9mm
View Full DetailsView Full Details

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Photographs taken using the Panasonic Lumix GX7

BENDING OVER BACKWARDSFrog Eyed Fly ...PEELEDDog Stinkhorn ...A PAIR OF GRAINY NUDESI WANT IT JUST HERE WITH LOVEAberdeen BeachJUST GOOD FRIENDSChalkhill Blue...PLAYONG POOLSMOOTH GOLDEN SAXOLLIEHere comes the sun...ROGO ...Choosing
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Comments


mikehit e2
5 6.8k 11 United Kingdom
14 Aug 2013 3:50PM
This is exciting times for MFT ranges - especially with talk of two new OM-D models to be announced in September(one lower spec and one higher spec).

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14 Aug 2013 8:56PM
I think u should have pointed out a few pluses for the Oly: it has twice the resolution in the viewfinder as the Pana, and almost twice the lcd res; it has a lower, lowest ISO setting so if you want to make those "smooth water, smooth clouds" shots, it's a little easier on the Oly; the Oly has a higher top shutter speed; and more detail at lower iso's. Taken individually, they are not much, but altogether they made a somewhat big difference to me. Nice review though, and a great web site!

Mike, NY USA Smile
14 Aug 2013 8:58PM
Sorry, my mistake, the Pana has more dots on the touch screen Blush
15 Aug 2013 10:01AM
It's just my personal opinion, but I have noticed green cast at every Panasonic shot, at every review. I like Oly's colors and really afraid of new Panasonic sensor. Don't get me wrong, please. what do you think?
ChrisV 8 827 26 United Kingdom
15 Aug 2013 6:08PM

Quote:I think u should have pointed out a few pluses for the Oly: it has twice the resolution in the viewfinder as the Pana, and almost twice the lcd res; it has a lower, lowest ISO setting so if you want to make those "smooth water, smooth clouds" shots, it's a little easier on the Oly; the Oly has a higher top shutter speed; and more detail at lower iso's. Taken individually, they are not much, but altogether they made a somewhat big difference to me. Nice review though, and a great web site!

Mike, NY USA Smile



Apart from the detail at low ISO thing [which is possibly only in jpeg and a result of superior processing], you've got every one of those feature advantages the wrong way around.

It's interesting some of the Panny shots under artificial light have been done with a manual white balance - they look neutral [as you'd expect] whereas the OM5 shots have a distinct blue cast. Best to shoot in RAW anyway and it's not an issue...
Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
15 Aug 2013 9:04PM

Quote:Apart from the detail at low ISO thing [which is possibly only in jpeg and a result of superior processing], you've got every one of those feature advantages the wrong way around


I was just thinking that Chris, interesting times for sure.

I rate the new EP5 higher than the EM5, the only advantage the EM5 has is an optional grip and built in viewfinder.

If the EM5 never had the accessory port they would almost be identical in size.

The GX7 is more of a match for the EP5 I think, but all three are nice camera`s, that is for sure Smile
kodachrome 3 474
16 Aug 2013 11:07AM
It would be interesting to see how these 2 cameras fair against a Sony NEX 7 or NEX-6.

I got rid of all my Panny bodies G2/G3 but hung on to the Panny 14-45 and Oly 9-18 just in case these companies got sensible and brought out more affordable versions, now it looks like Olympus are.
Agreed about the green tint on some Panny shots, they have been plagued by this since the G1.
As said, interesting times ahead for the M4/3 format.
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
16 Aug 2013 6:40PM
I'm a simple soul in all this. The reason I have ordered a GX7 is entirely on the physical form.

The image quality on modern digital cameras has become a non issue for someone like me who never prints above 16 inches across and whose biggest monitor is only 1920px wide. My greatest need for quality is for Alamy's picky IQ control but my GF1 could walk that, let alone subsequent MFTs.

As ChrisV says, most IQ differences become irrelevant when you shoot RAW.

If I go out taking pictures for my videos or for Alamy I use my GH3 with battery grip. The GX7 is smaller and lighter than that, so becomes a useful take everywhere camera. If I had an OM-D, I'm not sure it would make much sense, size-wise.

I'm happy in every way with my E-PL5 but I hate the EVF on it which makes it unwieldy and ungainly. I like the Sony NEX cameras but where are the 7-14, 12-35 and 35-100 equivalent lenses, or the 14-140, for that matter, in such small packages?
Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
19 Aug 2013 7:36PM

Quote:Agreed about the green tint on some Panny shots, they have been plagued by this since the G1.
As said, interesting times ahead for the M4/3 format



Not noticed myself but I only have the 14mm, but its a none issue if your work flow is calibrated from start to finish.
21 Aug 2013 5:55PM
Assuming the exposure of the ISO charts is the same, you have to normalise the ISO values before comparing the results. For example, ISO 6400:

E-M5: f/7.1 and 1/160sec
GX7: f/7.1 and 1/200 sec.

At ISO6400 for OM-D E-M5 to have same exposure as GX7, you need 0.33EV longer exposure. Or, if you keep the shutter speed same as GX7 at ISO6400, i.e., 1/200 you have to use ISO 8000on E-M5!

The same 1/3EV difference at ISO3200 -- f/6.3 vs. f/7.1!
21 Aug 2013 8:22PM
I purchased a PENTAX K-01 a few months ago and for $295.00 which includes the 18 - 55 mm lens I think its a real bargain. Plus I can use all the Pentax K Lens ever made. A real bargain.
richshep 12 9 United Kingdom
25 Aug 2013 8:40PM
The battery door on the E-M5 is mostly plastic. I think the base plate is too.
joshwa e2
4 605 United Kingdom
26 Aug 2013 10:37AM

Quote:The battery door on the E-M5 is mostly plastic. I think the base plate is too.


Hi, we've updated the article, you're right about the battery door on the E-M5 being plastic, however the base plate of the camera is metal, thanks Josh
richshep 12 9 United Kingdom
26 Aug 2013 12:34PM

Quote:The battery door on the E-M5 is mostly plastic. I think the base plate is too.

Hi, we've updated the article, you're right about the battery door on the E-M5 being plastic, however the base plate of the camera is metal, thanks Josh



I stand corrected - I've just put a multimeter across the scratches I stupidly acquired after balancing it on some rocks - and it conducts. Always take a tripod if the light is lowSad
philbb 7 6
23 Dec 2013 1:01PM
I really like the look of this camera but very disappointed there is no auto iso available in manual mode. I can find no reference within this review but it has been mentioned elsewhere.
I have this feature on my Panasonic LX5 so surprised to see it omitted on the GX7

Auto iso in manual (ideally with EC) would allow me to fix the aperture & shutter and let the iso "float" to get the right exposure.

Come on Panasonic it can't be that hard to implement this feature commonly found on competitor's cameras.

Alternatively a minimum shutter speed in aperture priority would have been useful.

Phil
If Panasonic M43 cameras lean towards any color it's the magenta/red tint, not green. This has been corroborated by Imaging Resource as well as many other observations by those with a keen eye. It's plain to my eyes that Olympus cameras in general tend to lean towards the blue/green tint as they tend to oversaturate the colors. You only need to look at the pictures on this website to see the Panasonic clearly has the better dynamic range. The ability of the Panasonic to resolve definition, color and detail in the green trees is superior to the EM5 which tends to treat the entire area as a dark green mass with little definition. Yes, the colors on the EM5 look punchier, but do they look more accurate? This is something that is subjective and depends on what people prefer. I'd rather have stronger detail and definition in my shots with more accurate color rendition. Pixel peeping the sample shots above clearly show the Panasonic with the sharper, better defined images and more accurate color renditions.
tadam13 New Member
23 Nov 2014 7:09PM
I am going to purchase one of these cameras in the next 30 days. I am leaning heavily toward the Panasonic. The one feature I feel i might miss is off camera, wireless TTL flash operation. I have not been able to confirm but I believe the Olympus would work with their wireless flash units and the panasonic will not have such a capability. Still deciding how important this is but was hoping some on could confirm that the Olympus does have this option and the panasonic does not. I do enjoy shooting with handheld off camera flash and no cable would be great.

many thanks
T

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