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Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2009

Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2009 - Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2009 reveals a taste of nature’s finest images.

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Category : Competitions
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Stalking the tiger © Andy RouseA male killer whale hunting king penguins, wildebeest migrating in the rain, a pair of young rhesus macaques squabbling over a leaking tap and an explosion of spring in an Ithaca forest – these are just some of the highly commended images announced today in this year’s Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition 2009.

Press Release:


A male killer whale hunting king penguins, wildebeest migrating in the rain, a pair of young rhesus macaques squabbling over a leaking tap and an explosion of spring in an Ithaca forest – these are just some of the highly commended images announced today in this year’s Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition 2009.

Currently in its 46th year, the competition is owned by London’s Natural History Museum and BBC Wildlife Magazine and regarded as the international leader in the artistic representation of the natural world. This year the competition is sponsored by Veolia Environnement, a world leader in environmental services, working with businesses, communities and governments to minimise our daily impact on the environment we have a communal responsibility to protect.

This year the competition attracted a record 43,135 entries from 94 countries. Among the highly commended selection are photographs by UK photographers Andy Rouse and Brian W Matthews. Rouse’s image, stalking the tiger, shone through in the One Earth Award category which seeks to highlight interaction between humans and the natural world. Rouse captured his image of a collection of tourist jeeps following a tiger during a two-month stay in Ranthambore National Park.

Andy said, "The rise in tourism at the national park has had unarguably positive effects on the local
population’s attitudes to tigers as tourist revenue has made the animal more valuable in life than death. Witnessing this scene, the tourist jeeps reminded me of paparazzi and I thought this photo was a poignant illustration of the intrusion on the tigers’ environment – the flip-side and reality of the positive move towards tiger conservation.
"

Brian W Matthews’ delightful image, Borneo baby, was highly commended in the Animal Portrait category. Taken while Brian was working with orangutan researchers in Tanjun Putting National Park in Kalimantan, Indonesia, the baby’s mother was accustomed to researchers and was comfortable for them to watch from about five metres away.

Brian said, "The infant could not have been more than two months old, but almost appeared to play up to the camera, sticking out its tongue and pulling faces. Looking at this shot, it is impossible not to be reminded of a human baby and most people find it difficult not to smile."

The exhibition will include 95 winning, runner-up and commended photographs from the competition’s 17 categories. The category winners and overall winners – Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Veolia Environnement Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year – will be announced at an awards ceremony on 21 October, two days before the exhibition opens at the Natural History Museum. It tours regional and international venues after its London debut.

Last year, the exhibition at the Natural History Museum attracted nearly 161,000 visitors. More than a million others are expected to have seen the 2008 images at international and regional venues when the tour concludes.

Heather Clark Carrington, Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year spokesperson, said, "This year the exhibition will be displayed in one of the Museum’s larger galleries to cater for its increasing popularity and to allow us to showcase larger images. In addition we will be introducing an optional audio guide allowing visitors to hear photographers’ and judges’ comments on the images. As always, the exhibition will provide new insights into the natural world and challenge viewers to think about it in different ways."

For more information please visit the Veolia website.

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