Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Wide Colour Gamut On LCD Monitors

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

50% OFF new PortraitPro 12, plus EXTRA 5% OFF code EPHZROS414.
Category: General Photography

Colour Gamut And Image Quality - We take another look at colour gamut to see how it effects image quality.

Posted:
Print Article Jargon Buster: Off Jargon Buster: Off
In our previous article we said that when it comes to image quality, colour gamut is an important factor, however it alone does not determine image quality. 

When looking at a monitor with a wide colour gamut it's important to find out if the monitor has a color-gamut conversion function.

This function controls  the LCD monitor's color gamut based on the target color gamut, such as Adobe RGB or sRGB. What this means is even an LCD monitor with a wide colour gamut and high Adobe RGB coverage can be switched to sRGB mode so that the colours displayed on screen fall within the sRGB colour gamut. A monitor which has compatibility with both Adobe RGB and sRGB color gamuts is essential for applications demanding accurate colour generation such as when retouching images as well as other design work.

For purposes requiring accurate colour generation, an LCD colour monitor that has a wide colour gamut but lacks any colour gamut conversion function can actually be a disadvantage in some cases. Why? Well the colours generated are often too vivid for displaying images in the sRGB color gamut. In other words, the sRGB colour gamut cannot be reproduced accurately. 

Image comparision

Shown above is an sRGB colour gamut photograph displayed on an sRGB-compatible LCD monitor (photo at left) and on an LCD monitor which has a wide colour gamut, is incompatible with sRGB and has no colour gamut conversion function (photo at right).

While the photograph on the right appears vivid, saturation is unnaturally high in parts of the photo. We also see a significant departure from the colours envisioned by the photographer, as well as so-called memory colours.

The difference are easier to see in the animation to the right which flicks between the two shots. 

Visit EIZO for more information. 



Explore More

Creative Rain Photography Using A Samsung Camera

Creative Rain Photography With A Samsung Camera

Here are some top tips for shooting rain creatively with a S...

Top 10 Best Tips For Taking Better Portraits

Top 10 Best Portrait Photography Tips

10 top photo taking tips to help you improve your portraits.

Quick Tip: Instantly Improve Your Photos By Guiding The Eye

Instantly Improve Your Photos By Guiding The Eye

Learn how to use paths, lines and direction to lead the eye ...