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35mm film


strokebloke 6 481 16 England
1 Apr 2011 7:19PM
1. Any advice on suitable film [or slide] for an F5, mostly shooting wildlife/landscapes, would be much appreciated.
2. Why is 35mm slide considered better than 35mm film?
3. Advice about setting up a dark room to develop B&W + equipment + instruction would also be much appreciated.


Perhaps I ought to explain :-

2 years ago I bought a Sony a200. Completely new to photography - realised that it COULD be used as nothing more than a 'point shoot', so bought an FM2N (+ many books) to learn the basics of photography.
Now I have a a Nikon D100 with a very good selection of quality Nikon lenses [18-200 VR & 12-24 f4 etc] with which I am beginning to fairly consistently turn out, up to A2 size, publication quality images.
My intention is to purchase a D2X during the coming 2 to 3 months, so that I have the MP's & the pro quality kit.
I've been inspired to get the D2X since recently purchasing an F5 because I'd like to get back into being able to use film as and when necessary, rather than for the reasons I bought the FM2N.
So Film is the next hurdle for me (& I'm as green as grass Tongue)

Any help/advice, no matter how seermingly mundane or elementary will be gratefully received

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User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
1 Apr 2011 7:27PM
A couple of observations that might be slightly off-topic.

In the olden days, posh magazines used to demand either 35mm Kodachrome 25 trannies or, latterly, Ektachrome 64 in medium format.

Nowadays, the bias towards trannie film still persists in some quarters but my personal opinion is that modern negative film such as Kodak Ektar 100 beats them all hand down. (Cue for the Fuji clowns to object!)

Then on to the next point. Black and white film. Again it is a personal opinion but, if the intention is to scan the negatives and then produce monochrome images, you are stll far better to use a colour negative film, such as Ektar 100, and covert to B&W in Lightroom/Photoshop/Silver Efex. That way you have the full data from all the colour channels to play with. In a way, it's like having an infinite variety of infinitely graduated colour filters to place in front of your lens when shooting in FP4/Plus X/ Pan-F or whatever.


.
strokebloke 6 481 16 England
1 Apr 2011 7:39PM
OK. Thanks.

A couple of observations/Q's

What is trannie film?
What is/are FP4/Plus X/Pan-F ?

So far as setting up a darkroom is concerned, I'd recently read in one of the posts that developing B&W is not too difficult & it provides, with experience, the oportunity for the person developing to control the outcome, rather than being in the hands of a remote & anonymous lab, where, it was suggested in the post, the skill required to succesfully develop B&W is being lost.

How much all or even some of this is true, I have no idea, but I thought I would like to learn to develop for myself, as part of my photography.

I can certainly see your point about using colour neg, but, again in the post, the suggestion was that developing colour is best left to the professional labs.
FrankThomas e2
11 2.8k United Kingdom
1 Apr 2011 7:53PM
Trannie = Transparency (or slide) film
FP4 et al are black and white negative films.
(Fuji clowns ? - is that like opinionated Kodak clowns? )

You can develop E6 (transparency) yourself and apparently it's not too hard - just takes practice.
chris.maddock 13 3.4k United Kingdom
1 Apr 2011 7:54PM
Trannie film - transparency film, AKA slide film.
FP4, etc - types of monochrome (black & white) film.
strokebloke 6 481 16 England
1 Apr 2011 8:06PM
Thanks ALL Grin
chris.maddock 13 3.4k United Kingdom
1 Apr 2011 8:14PM

Quote:You can develop E6 (transparency) yourself and apparently it's not too hard - just takes practice.


You can do C41 (colour print) at home too, slightly easier than E6 because the temperatures aren't as critical.

For both you just need the appropriate chemical kit, a developing tank, a few mixing/storage bottles, thermometer, timer and somewhere to load the tank. That could be an understairs cupboard, bathroom or other room that is totally light-tight or a changing bag - a double-skinned bag with zips along one edge and elasticated armholes so you can get your hands in and work anywhere you like in daylight.

If you go for a bag I recommend getting the largest size and putting a cardboard box inside it, within which you actually work. Firstly it helps to keep all the bits and pieces in one place easy to find without them hiding in a fold of the bag, secondly working inside those bags it can get incredibly hot and the bag tends to stick to your hands, the box avoids that.
strokebloke 6 481 16 England
1 Apr 2011 8:43PM
Thanks Chris.
My intention is to turn part of my roof-space into a dark room. It is an area 4.5M2, with hot & cold water & heating already installed.
It was a playroom for the lads (4 of them) They've all left home now - are married with their own families & the grandchildren are NOT allowed up there. Grin

Presumably I can still purchase/borrow from libraries, books on darkroom techniques etc?
Thinking about it, I do have Ansell Adams "The Negative" & "The Print" on the bookshelves somewhere.
User_Removed 4 299 4 France
1 Apr 2011 9:35PM
"Thinking about it, I do have Ansell Adams "The Negative" & "The Print" on the bookshelves somewhere."

there in lies madness...these are very complex and technical books based on his "zone system" and I would rec you gather some experience and a little more knowledge before following him

ilford produced a volume called "monchrome darkroom practice" if I remember correctly...it was heavily biased to their products but the basics are there....also car boots spring to mind....for books and the odd piece of kit

I used a leica v35 focomat for 35mm with a multigrade head (multigrade was an ilford paper that could run from soft to hard...a bit like sharpen/brightness and contrast in photoshop)...the head contained a variable filter which you dialled to deal with soft or harsh negs

Paterson was another manufacturer of chemicals and kit who may still be going strong and finally some time back I saw a black and white specialist shop in the back of AP who may still exist...stuart....ps I loved it but the down time clearing up was beaten easily by the off switch on the pc
KenTaylor e2
10 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
1 Apr 2011 10:11PM

Quote:I do have Ansell Adams "The Negative" & "The Print" on the bookshelves somewhere.


Collectors items and no need for any other books
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
1 Apr 2011 10:19PM

Quote:I do have Ansell Adams "The Negative" & "The Print" on the bookshelves somewhere.

Collectors items and no need for any other books



Is "The Camera" worth reading these days ?
strokebloke 6 481 16 England
1 Apr 2011 11:00PM

Quote:Is "The Camera" worth reading these days ?


It is when you knew/know as little about photography as I did/do GrinGrinGrin
Seriously, I learned a lot from it & it clarified much that I wondered about.

The Negative & The Print, along with The Camera, I suppose, are text books for Higher Tech/Degree students.
Being a retired college lecturer, I'm interested in them, even if they are above my head at times.

Thanks bornstupix.
your obs, whilst being difinitive, Smile (I'm already quite mad ~ ask my wife/sons) are nevertheless valued, sound sensible, and are very much appreciated.
I must admit that the digi/PC pull is considerable - but I do want to be as comfortable with small format film as I am with digi.
User_Removed 4 299 4 France
2 Apr 2011 8:41AM
I use a nikon f5 and a 90fx for slide film and c41...if you have to have the print film processed and scanned to disc the costs can be horrendous!....the slide film does not work out cheap per frame either

I thought about how many great shots per session with the camera I actually achieve and then looked at the darkroom issue costs again as I had sold my processing gear 7/8 years ago.

My personal conclusion (as I am not a big fan of my D90) is to keep my old D70, trade the D90 for a D700 or D3 and return to mainly digital...this is probably because I "see" in 35mm after 40 odd years with my cameras...

when I use film I become frustrated with the time scale of processing and find my self shooting with the digital as well and then wonder why I spent the time and money on the film images in the first place....best of luck anyway folks...If only a little of Adams, John Swannell, O Winston Link or Nocon rub off on us we all win!........

as a final point...look at this guys site..http://www.kenrockwell.com/index.htm....there is much of interest

stuart (in deepest rural France where a good colour lab is hard to find)
SteveCharles 12 2.3k 18 England
2 Apr 2011 10:03AM

Quote:1. Any advice on suitable film [or slide] for an F5, mostly shooting wildlife/landscapes, would be much appreciated.


The slide film of choice for years for landscape photographers was/is Fuji Velvia 50, I personally prefer Fuji Provia for its less saturated, colder look. I also liked the consumer grade Sensia but that's gone now. For colour print, the newer Kodak Ektar 100 has quite a cyan colour, but is designed to be easy to scan. The colours of Fuji Pro 160/400 are quite nice for landscape. I would recommend trying a few different types and seeing what you like.


Quote:2. Why is 35mm slide considered better than 35mm film?


Slide (transparency) generally has finer grain and richer colours for more detailed and saturated images, but have less exposure latitude so can be harder to use than print film. They look great projected. Colour print (C41) is easier to use, print and scan.


Quote:3. Advice about setting up a dark room to develop B&W + equipment + instruction would also be much appreciated.


I have this book , the photography's a bit dated but it contains everything you would need know. I've never actually set up a darkroom, but I'd still recommend it!


Quote:My intention is to purchase a D2X during the coming 2 to 3 months, so that I have the MP's & the pro quality kit.


Nothing wrong with that and quite cheap now, but the reason for that is the D300, which you might want to consider instead, a lot of people say the D300 has the better image quality, although the D2X has the build.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
2 Apr 2011 2:55PM

Quote:
(Fuji clowns ? - is that like opinionated Kodak clowns? )




Very similar - but with the brains removed!


Wink

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