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5D MkII Adobe Camera RAW and CS4 Issues

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johnp
johnp  10139 forum posts United Kingdom
18 Apr 2010 - 6:28 PM

I am using a 5D MkII. In the menu I have set the Profile to sRGB. I shoot everything in RAW. I use CS4 and all updates have been installed.

If I copy my RAW files into a folder and then select an image in that folder, Bridge tells me that the bit depth is 16 bit, the colour mode is RGB and the profile is untagged. If I then open the image using ACR and go into Image>Mode I find that the image is now 8 bit. And if I go into Edit>Convert To Profile it says that the Source Space is Adobe RGB.

Why not 16 bit?
Why not sRGB?

I cannot find any means of changing these features. Can anybody offer an explanation, please?

Also I like to work at 300 ppi but when I open an image and go into Image>Image Size I am presented with pixel dimensions and an image size based on 240 ppi. Again I can find no way of telling CS4 to always work on 300 ppi. Is it possible? (NB if I create a new document, CS4 makes it 300 ppi, which is how I set preferences, so it does appear to "know" I work at 300 ppi)

Your advice will be much appreciated

John

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18 Apr 2010 - 6:28 PM

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MadTrace
MadTrace  10268 forum posts United Kingdom
18 Apr 2010 - 6:33 PM

Why are you shooting in sRGB?

Adobecs
Adobecs  8114 forum posts England
18 Apr 2010 - 8:01 PM

Hi John.
I think when you open your image in ACR there is a line of text stating what preferences your ACR is set to. If you click on the text it will open a dialog box where you can change the preferences and set them to what you want.
Cheers,
Pat.

User_Removed
18 Apr 2010 - 8:11 PM


Quote: Also I like to work at 300 ppi but when I open an image and go into Image>Image Size I am presented with pixel dimensions and an image size based on 240 ppi. Again I can find no way of telling CS4 to always work on 300 ppi. Is it possible? (NB if I create a new document, CS4 makes it 300 ppi, which is how I set preferences, so it does appear to "know" I work at 300 ppi)

It doesn't exist until you print.

If you are using photoshop with a known dot-ptich monitor to show "projected size" then you are doing it wrong. - photoshop doesn't treat the ppi value this way, its more of a conversion factor than a display variable.

This is why my monitor shows a 1 inch x 1 inch @ 300 ppi to be the "actual" size of 9cm.

If you want an image to be the "actual size" of the print on your screen, then you set photoshops PPI value to the dot pitch PPI capability of your screen. In my case: 0.311 dot ptich and 81.59 actual PPI value.

So a 1 inch by 1 inch @ 81.59 PPI displays at exactly 1 inch in size.

- however if i moved that file to my WQUXGA monitor which can display 203.2 PPI - it would be all wrong...

-that is why doing it that way is silly as everyone has variable resolution monitors. So its best to remember that PPI/DPI doesn't exist until you print. Digital data has no physical "length" measurement, and it displays at a resolution not a size.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 18 Apr 2010 - 8:43 PM
KevSB
KevSB  101407 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2010 - 8:17 PM


Quote: Why are you shooting in sRGB?

Adobe RGB is irrelevant for real photography. sRGB gives better (more consistent) results and the same, or brighter, colors.

Using Adobe RGB is one of the leading causes of colors not matching between monitor and print.


sRGB vs. Adobe RGB

rossd
rossd  111061 forum posts England
18 Apr 2010 - 8:39 PM

Puts on helmet and retires to bunker!!! Wink

NEWMANP
NEWMANP e2 Member 61583 forum postsNEWMANP vcard United Kingdom574 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2010 - 8:39 PM

rgb is very relevant if you want to print. i set my camera to rgb process that way and change profile to srgb for web use when its reduced to 72dpi. rgb is a larger colour space cabable of a wider colour gammut than srgb which is intended for projection and web use.
likewise 240dpi is the optimum for printing.
Phil

mlewis
mlewis  91476 forum posts United Kingdom
18 Apr 2010 - 8:41 PM

johnp, in Adobe Camer RAW click on the line of blue text below the image display area. That text tells you the conversion settings. If you click on it you can change them. I suspect that they are set to 8 bit, 240ppi, and Adobe RGB colourspace.



Quote: Why are you shooting in sRGB?

Adobe RGB is irrelevant for real photography. sRGB gives better (more consistent) results and the same, or brighter, colors.

Using Adobe RGB is one of the leading causes of colors not matching between monitor and print.

sRGB vs. Adobe RGB

Ken Rockwell is talking absolute rubbish there.

User_Removed
18 Apr 2010 - 8:46 PM


Quote:
Ken Rockwell is talking absolute rubbish there.

Does he ever talk sense?

Ken Rockwell lives in the 19th century along with anyone who think the web displays at 72dpi and doesn't have ICC control.

It utterly shocks me when people report that the picture on a monitor / web is 72dpi and only sRGB can be used...

cameracat
cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2010 - 9:16 PM

LOL....Someone actually reads & quotes Ken Rockwell, Therefore it must be right....Grin

Just goes to show that Mr Rockwell does not read any of his many Nikon manuals, Where they explain the reason WHY there is
an option to shoot in sRGB or Adobe RGB, Along with some notes on why you might use one in preferance to the other.

Basics = sRGB for images that will go straight to print, With very little post processing.

Adobe RGB for images that may be subject to extensive post processing ( Note the word " May " )

Of course if it makes more sense to you, To shoot in a " Smaller " colour space, Stick with sRGB, Heck! Its a free world.

If you want to know all there is to know about sRGB & Adobe RGB, Plus some colour management ( its not that hard really )

Otherwise the answer to the OPs question has been answered......Sort off.....Wink

justin c
justin c  104519 forum posts England36 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2010 - 9:23 PM

With monitors now able to display 100% of the Adobe RGB colour space and printers constantly expanding the colours they're are able to reproduce, why cripple the quality of your images by shooting in sRGB. You can convert an Adobe RGB image to sRGB with the click of a mouse, but you gain nothing by converting sRGB to Adobe RGB.

Last Modified By justin c at 18 Apr 2010 - 9:23 PM
cameracat
cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2010 - 9:25 PM

Well put Justin......Smile

justin c
justin c  104519 forum posts England36 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2010 - 9:29 PM

SmileSmile

KevSB
KevSB  101407 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
19 Apr 2010 - 9:54 AM

most places I read and even a lecture I attended recently by a professional photoshop artist recommended using sgrb so must admit I am a little confused here, the ken rockwell link was just one i grabbed very quickly and there are many more out there saying the same. so must admit I am now wondering which is the best way to go, is there any articles fighting the case of using adobe over Sgrb

User_Removed
19 Apr 2010 - 9:59 AM


Quote: Most places I read and even a lecture I attended recently by a professional photoshop artist recommended using sgrb so must admit I am a little confused here, the ken rockwell link was just one i grabbed very quickly and there are many more out there saying the same. so must admit I am now wondering which is the best way to go, is there any articles fighting the case of using adobe over Sgrb

If you think the web is 72dpi then do not touch aRGB.

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