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A low cost way of shooting 6x6 120?


26 Apr 2008 5:00PM
im contemplating buying some kind of medium format camera ive been looking at and have been offered a bronica sqa complete kit with a 80mm lens (im not a 100% sure what im on about at the mo) i really like the idea of shooting 1:1 ratio and im attracted the the added res of 120 but i dont want to take the plunge with out having a go on somthing more ... well... cheap i conteplated a ensign ful-vue (i have seen one in a local shop for 10) for cheapness but they look a little bit basic and i would prefer i eye level finder. has anyone got any ideas of a camera that might give me an idea of the feel of this format without breaking the bank
any other advice or tips or info on this format and coresponding equipment would be ace too
cheers!

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keith selmes 11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
26 Apr 2008 5:19PM
See how the price goes on this Nettar
Rather primitive compared to an SQA, but probably as good as gets in cheap price range.
There are better models with rangefinder built in but more expensive. A Moscow 5 might be 50 for a worker, but usually 6x9.
Also Rolleicord TLR cameras, you look down into the ground class, but can also flip the lid and have a glassless eye level finder, very simple but works quite well. Cost a bit more though. Maybe 60 to 150 ?
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
26 Apr 2008 7:32PM
A cheap twin lens reflex Smile
Snapper 9 3.8k 3 United States Outlying Islands
26 Apr 2008 8:25PM
You might want to look for a Yashicamat 124 or similar, like these ones.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
26 Apr 2008 8:29PM

Quote:You might want to look for a Yashicamat 124


Had one and there very good, the quoted by now price is a little steep.
chris.maddock 13 3.4k United Kingdom
26 Apr 2008 9:18PM
If you want something very cheap and basic, yet also very capable, have a look at the Russian Lubitels, here .
I don't know how good some of the prices are because I don't know what the new price was before they were discontinued - I paid about 20-25 new for my two in the mid-eighties.
The 166B is 6x6 only whilst the Universal has masks for 6x4.5 as well. They are somewhat plasticky but perform surprisingly well, the lenses are pretty sharp although they do vignette a bit. As it happens I've recently been scanning a load of my old films, including some from the Lubitels - and was very pleasantly surprised at the quality I've got from them.
kaybee 10 3.9k 24 Scotland
26 Apr 2008 9:37PM
If you go for a Lubitel (and they are great starters for 120) be aware that sometimes they can get light leakage at the back. This tends to be because they only have one small clip holding it shut. However - a bit of tape once you have loaded it will ensure that it is light tight.
kenskinn 8 74 England
26 Apr 2008 9:55PM
The Bronica is a system camera with interchangable viewfinders. If the Bronny you hve beem offered has a hood viewfinder you can change it for a reflex finder.There are plenty on E- bAY.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
26 Apr 2008 9:58PM
seagull


Bronica`s are OK, still not exactly cheap.
27 Apr 2008 2:38AM
cheers cheers ... that nettar seems the best option for me i think (unless anyone else has a good option)

the bronica i have been offered has a ae finder

if its a sqa with ae finder + the "standard" waist level and a power winder with a 80mm and 2 backs(is this too vague) any ideas of value?
keith selmes 11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
27 Apr 2008 10:05AM
At guess, somewhere between 200 and 500, maybe about 300.
McKenzie 8 22 United Kingdom
27 Apr 2008 10:39AM
Some of the Zeiss folders ( like the nettar mentioned by Keith) are a lot of fun and can produce some very sharp images, B&W FP4 or similar gives a lot of latitude for exposure errors.

A cheap TLR like a Delmonta or a really basic Halina will also provide you with some fun, as far as TLR's go you are probably better off going for the better quality TLR's like Minolta Autocord's Rollieflex, Yashicamat's etc.

I have used quite few old folders, mostly 6x9's for landscape work and am always amazed by the results that can be obtained by a camera that is about 50 or more years old. I really nice folder is an Ensign Selfix 820 with the Ross Xpress 105mm lens....very sharp, this has built in masks to go down from 6x9 to 6x6, this is a really good quality English camera from the early fifties.

Ebay has hundreds of old medium formats on offer, but be aware that some of the slow speeds on the old folders can be a bit sticky and watch out for fungus on the lenses. A camera that has been serviced and checked (CLA) is the way to go if you can find one.

Regards
Steve
McKenzie 8 22 United Kingdom
27 Apr 2008 10:46AM
I meant to mention that I have bought from this Ebay seller before and have always found his items to be well described.

http://search.ebay.co.uk/_W0QQsassZclicklovely

Hope that may help.

Steve
c_evans99 11 7.0k 1 Wales
27 Apr 2008 2:53PM
Agfa Isolettes are probably better than Zeiss Ikon folders at the lower end of the price range. A Isolette I with an Agnar lens can be had for 5 or so, and are quite capable.

This was taken with an Isolette I, and the scan doesn't do the original slide justice.
McKenzie 8 22 United Kingdom
27 Apr 2008 7:30PM

Quote:Agfa Isolettes are probably better than Zeiss Ikon folders at the lower end of the price range. A Isolette I with an Agnar lens can be had for 5 or so, and are quite capable.

This was taken with an Isolette I, and the scan doesn't do the original slide justice.



Just be careful with the Agfa's, the bellows can very often not be light tight, they suffer from tiny pinholes on the corners of the folds. Nearly every one of these I have seen have had this problem. You can check it in a dark room and holding a bright torch inside the bellows any pinholes will show up! The Zeiss bellows are for the most part no problem, they are leather and seem more durable.

Steve

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