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American Accents :)

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shadow18
shadow18  3406 forum posts England
14 May 2011 - 2:42 AM

Hi everyone! This is really silly, but I was just curious what American accents sound like to British people? I don't mind if you say they sound dumb or harsh or anything, I'm just curious, because I know we Americans think British accents sound awesome! haha! That probably sounds really silly to you all! Smile Someone please answer my question just out of curiousity!! Smile it's okay if you make fun of American accents, i just want honest opinions for fun! Smile

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14 May 2011 - 2:42 AM

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monstersnowman
14 May 2011 - 2:54 AM

I think it sounds awful when coming out of a british actor called Hugh Lawry on the US drama series 'House' !!! OK I know that isnt what you were asking but I couldnt stop myself :oP

StrayCat
StrayCat  1014200 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
14 May 2011 - 5:16 AM

I think Lawry does a good job, although I think he was hilarious on Black Adder. I'm not a fan of House, but I've watched him on Late Night with Jay Leno, and he discussed the difficulty of trying to do an American accent, or trying to drop his British accent.

Being Canadian, I've been around people with British accents, and those with American accents, since I was a child, but I can't say whether I like or dislike them. Just within the US, Canada, or the UK, the accents are so different from one area of the same country to another. I find Australian accents harsh, and my own accent from the east coast might be considered harsh. Flying around the world, the Air Traffic Controllers in some countries were difficult to understand. In Atlanta, Ga, they all sounded like Elvis.Grin Scottish is near impossible to understand for a newcomer on the radio. I thought France would be a piece of cake, considering Canada is bilingual, and many ATC controllers have a French accent; not so, they were very difficult to understand, and I took French in school. British controllers were very easy to understand, Mexicans weren't too bad once you get used to the H sound of the J, and the J sound of the Y. The Calgary VOR is YYC, and they would clear us to the Jankee Jankee Charlie. Or clear us to the Huliet beacon.

My wife will turn off a program on TV with a British accent. Sorry folks.Wink

A security woman in Las Vegas unlocked the gate door and walked me to the airplane one night, and in the thickest southern American Drawl said; "I love your accent." Lol, that was when I realised I had one.Grin

Last Modified By StrayCat at 14 May 2011 - 5:17 AM
Ewanneil
Ewanneil  31118 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
14 May 2011 - 5:27 AM


Quote: My wife will turn off a program on TV with a British accent. Sorry folks.Wink

When I read this I thought I'd try and turn my TV off with a British accent but it didn't work and eventually I had to do it with the remote control. Wink Sorry couldn't resist it.

dcash29
dcash29  81870 forum posts England
14 May 2011 - 8:43 AM

I cant say ive ever had a problem with accents. For me its the content of the program that matters.

Big Bri
Big Bri  1215507 forum posts England
14 May 2011 - 9:14 AM

Are you asking about accents in TV / movies, or in real life ? I've worked with Americans for 20 years, have been to America about 20 times, east, west and points in between, and I've heard a huge variety of accents. Some accents for me are defined by the person I most associate them with, so for instance, a New York cop I talked to 10 years ago made a big impact.
For the same reason, I used to hate a "Northern Irish" accent because we used to hear Ian Paisley on TV a lot and he sounds awful. Since then though, have heard many different accents from Northern Ireland, and can be made to sound wonderful, depending on who is doing the talking. So, I like Holly Hunter's accent. Smile

As for Hugh Laurie, I have heard his American accent received a lot of praise, although I have never watched House. On the other hand, I can think of some real stinkers where American actors have attempted English accents. Christian Slater and Keanu Reeves spring to mind.

Big Bri
Big Bri  1215507 forum posts England
14 May 2011 - 9:17 AM

Favourite time I was asked about my accent in America (it happens a LOT) was in an "English" pub in Monterrey, California, and the waitress asked "Oh my God! Are you from AUSTRALIA????"

hehe

big fella
big fella  10484 forum posts England
14 May 2011 - 9:41 AM

**** Van Dyke - Mary Poppins - nuff said.........

mikehit
mikehit e2 Member 45758 forum postsmikehit vcard United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
14 May 2011 - 9:55 AM


Quote: I think it sounds awful when coming out of a british actor called Hugh Lawry on the US drama series 'House' !!! OK I know that isnt what you were asking but I couldnt stop myself :oP

So bad it fooled the American director and the casting crew.Wink

I don't really have a problem with any of them - except sometimes in conversation someone who has one of those lo-o-ong slo-o-ow drawn out Alabama drawls. I keep wanting to finish their sentences for them so they canmove onto their next thought.

cmawson
cmawson  10270 forum posts United Kingdom
14 May 2011 - 10:38 AM

Having lived in central/southern Virginia, I love the accent there especially the country folk, but any southern American drawl/accent does it for me.

I always like it when my wife gets angry or frustrated, as her accent goes real southern....bliss...Wink

Last Modified By cmawson at 14 May 2011 - 10:38 AM
monstersnowman
14 May 2011 - 11:21 AM


Quote: I think it sounds awful when coming out of a british actor called Hugh Lawry on the US drama series 'House' !!! OK I know that isnt what you were asking but I couldnt stop myself :oP

So bad it fooled the American director and the casting crew.Wink

I don't really have a problem with any of them - except sometimes in conversation someone who has one of those lo-o-ong slo-o-ow drawn out Alabama drawls. I keep wanting to finish their sentences for them so they canmove onto their next thought.

Its not how bad or indeed good his accent is but the fact that I cant oversome seeing his face and expecting the english upper-class accent to come out and then this awful noise .. it just grates on me. :o)

jken
jken  71672 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
14 May 2011 - 11:43 AM

Never had a problem with any American accent, i had an uncle in Scotland who was American, i loved his accent.
As said above, the Southern American accent does it for me, i love it.

lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1013935 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
14 May 2011 - 1:33 PM


Quote: You'd struggle with broad Brummie, Geordie, Glaswegian etc.

To be fair a lot of English people have trouble with them too Smile I had a 10 minute conversation with a guy with abroad Glaswegian accent a few months back..when I got off the phone, my wife asked what he said. I had to reply that I hadn't a clue!

Last Modified By lobsterboy at 14 May 2011 - 1:33 PM
ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade  1014554 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
14 May 2011 - 1:43 PM

I like the north east accent - especially Italian Americans, they say "cwoffe" instead of Coffee., that's cool

not so keen on the southern one, they sound a little "special needs"

california was a bit generic - some cool accents, but sounded like most shows you get on TV

kinda prefer the canadian accent - I can usually spot a toronto accent for some reason

best british-isles accent is a soft irish female accent, followed by a proper Clitheroe accent (Eastern Lancastian, but not the harshness of Burnley and Blackburn - not many people will know it I guess), then edinbugh and maybe even light geordie - broad georide is just noise.

keith selmes
14 May 2011 - 1:49 PM

From a Devonian perspective, some American accents sound English - in some parts they seem to even use some of the same dialect.
An American once asked if I was from "back east". I think he meant Boston, New England, I said "yes, all the way" and then explained where I meant.

I find Texas accents interesting - where they walk on flaws and look up at the ska.

Some american accents really grate, and sadly they're often chosen for training videos and documentaries. I guess they're thought to sound intelligent, or neutral and clear, actually its more like scratching glass.

Probably the nicest I met were from somewhere near the northern US border - they were very good natured and polite, and they said aboot more often than most Canadians do.

What I really hate is Talk Like a Pirate day. Most people do you know, all year round, if you live where they came from.

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