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Apple 23" Cinema Display

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paulclarke
5 Jul 2012 - 6:12 PM

Hi Guy's,

I'm changing my photoshop editing system from the PC to a Mac, have a question regarding the Apple monitor itself.

Anybody have any information about calibrating "ICC Profiling" the Apple cinema display 23"

Other than the basic controls such as brightness and contrast, are there any advanced settings available for use with a hardware calibrator for colour profiling for accurate colour consistency ?

I'm familiar with using a CRT with the Spyder calibrator, just wandering what advanced controls are available when using the Mac system..

Regards. Paul.

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5 Jul 2012 - 6:12 PM

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User_Removed
5 Jul 2012 - 7:39 PM


Quote: Hi Guy's,

I'm changing my photoshop editing system from the PC to a Mac,.

Think VERY carefully before doing that. Apple computers do have some advantages in the eyes of some but they are probably far outweighed by the negatives.

If you are currently using a CRT monitor, then obviously an upgrade is very long overdue - but think about a PC with a top quality modern monitor.

.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 5 Jul 2012 - 7:40 PM
sherlob
sherlob e2 Member 82325 forum postssherlob vcard United Kingdom125 Constructive Critique Points
5 Jul 2012 - 7:51 PM

Careful Paul,

Often these threads turn into a rant about how much folk hate Mac's and how anyone buying one has more money than sense. Personally, I made the switch last year and I am over the moon - indeed I get frustrated every time I have to use my windows machine at work. It's not necessarily that one is better than the other - but for me the Mac OS is just a nicer place to be. Subjective I know, but there you have it.

This thread has come up before - so a quick forum search may be in order. I am no expert on the issues raised, but I have used successfully my old Spyder 2 with out problems. The gloss screen could be a pain if you don't place the computer carefully - so before you buy give some thought as to where its going to live. I have the 27" screen and it is great to work with.

Alos remember that if you are a student or work in education you MAY be eligible for educational discount if you buy from an Apple store rather than a 3rd party retailer.

Adam

rogerfry
rogerfry e2 Member 8509 forum postsrogerfry vcard United Kingdom
5 Jul 2012 - 7:59 PM

I assume you're talking about the old 23" cinema display and not the iMac....if so look here

User_Removed
5 Jul 2012 - 8:30 PM

Careful Paul

Many people passionately believe Apple products to be overpriced gloss and as a result these threads can become quite heated. Like those iMacs with all the guts in the monitor which get very hot and break.

Mac fan bois will often get in first with a warning as they know that it's hard to defend wasting so much money on a Mac and that people will attack those foolish enough to fall prey to the slick marketing Grin

Mac monitors are glossy and this makes them trickier to calibrate than a matte monitor. It also makes them less suitable for photo editing than a matte monitor. Bear that in mind.

Graysta
Graysta  91135 forum posts England
5 Jul 2012 - 9:34 PM


Quote: but for me the Mac OS is just a nicer place to be

My choice. my opinion.
Thats all folks.

rogerfry
rogerfry e2 Member 8509 forum postsrogerfry vcard United Kingdom
5 Jul 2012 - 9:45 PM

Oh dear ......we're at it again! It's always amazing how people leap on the forums trying to bash the Mac users instead of answering the question asked by the poster.

For their information, the 23" cinema display is a matt screen...not glossy .

Last Modified By rogerfry at 5 Jul 2012 - 9:46 PM
strawman
strawman  1022010 forum posts United Kingdom16 Constructive Critique Points
5 Jul 2012 - 10:03 PM

Hi does your question not depend on the calibration device/software you are using rather than the OS? Sorry my advice would be to go to the FAQ section of the calibration device and look up its advice. Good luck to the OP on getting a fix. To my knowledge it is as simple for the user as you say. On all the ones I have used it has a description of the settings to drive the screen to in terms of brightness and contrast (if you have those controls), then answer the questions the calibration software asks, attached the calibration device and go have a coffee, (other beverages are suitable but sever boredom may set in if you sit and watch it) (Oh and if you have coffee make certain its Java based, flash coffees do not work on Mac's, but Late's do)

Good luck.

Last Modified By strawman at 5 Jul 2012 - 10:04 PM
User_Removed
5 Jul 2012 - 11:03 PM


Quote: It's always amazing how people leap on the forums trying to bash the Mac users instead of answering the question asked by the poster.

It always amazes you? Really?

I'm not amazed by it at all, I'm surprised that you aren't used to it by now. I'm used to Mac advocates like you posting to defend the Mac instead of answering the question asked by the poster. Smile

sherlob
sherlob e2 Member 82325 forum postssherlob vcard United Kingdom125 Constructive Critique Points
5 Jul 2012 - 11:12 PM


Quote: I'm not amazed by it at all, I'm surprised that you aren't used to it now.

Sadly I am used to it, but still it disappoints me that anyone would think that its ok. I'm rapidly coming to the conclusion that contributing to threads like this is just a waste of my time - sad as it means I can't learn from them.

User_Removed
5 Jul 2012 - 11:16 PM


Quote: still it disappoints me that anyone would think that its ok

You're right, not only is it disappointing but it's a disgrace that someone would mention switching from one system to another and that anyone would then would dare to post their opinion about those systems. It's not a forum.

GlennH
GlennH  91918 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jul 2012 - 7:35 AM


Quote: Other than the basic controls such as brightness and contrast, are there any advanced settings available for use with a hardware calibrator for colour profiling for accurate colour consistency ?

It's helpful to separate the subjects of calibration and profiling when thinking on this subject, as the two are related, but different operations. Calibration settings get tagged onto colour profiles and load at start-up, whilst the profile itself needs a compliant piece of software before it can function.

Generally speaking in calibration it's best to keep tweaking of onscreen controls to a minimum, as all controls in an LCD monitor other than brightness/luminosity (black point) are digital adjustments, and as such are liable to have a detrimental effect on monitor performance. Monitor purists tend to adjust nothing other than brightness, leaving gamma and white point settings at native, but still the default settings in calibration software aren't a bad place to start (usually 2.2 gamma, 120cd/mē luminosity, 6500K white point).

These ideas apply as much to a Mac display as any other. You possibly need Spyder 3 Pro minimum for an Apple Cinema display. I'm not sure that earlier versions coped very well with LED backlighting, and the more basic Spyder packages have tended to be too limited in their functionality (you need to be able to set a target luminance, for instance).

parallax
parallax e2 Member 5118 forum postsparallax vcard United Kingdom
6 Jul 2012 - 8:23 AM

God there's some misguided and inaccurate anti Mac rubbish on here.
Before I get flamed by the PC mob, I'm a graphic designer by trade so monitor calibration to press fidelity is vital in my trade.
I have to have a accurately calibrated monitor as of right or I'm in the shyt.
I use a top of the range 27'' Mac monitor which has a gloss finish. The image quality is superb.

If you are at all concerned about colour fidelity, the first thing to do is to work in lower ambient light, irrespective of whether you have a matt or gloss monitor.

Then:

1. Get a good third party monitor calibration system.
2. Obtain the relevant paper profiles.
3. Perform test prints to check screen to print fidelity.

This is standard irrespective whether Mac or PC

If you want to go Mac, just go to an Apple store and try one for yourself.

779HOB
779HOB  21021 forum posts United Kingdom
6 Jul 2012 - 11:30 AM

Is there an advantage to using a MAC over a PC? Other than some people preferring the interface, but from a technical point of view does a MAC perform better? What makes it worth the extra money? I used to own a MAC and like them but use a PC now basically because I can afford one. I would have a MAC again if I had money to spare but it would be for aesthetic reasons not technical ones.

strawman
strawman  1022010 forum posts United Kingdom16 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jul 2012 - 12:06 PM

Guys while there are differences, and I know I have an opinion, in cases like this should we not stick to answering a specific help question which related to calibrating a monitor on a Mac system.

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