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Are proper cameras doomed?


Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
13 Feb 2014 7:27PM
OK. Let's see if this works - hmm, it does now. I'm baffled. Grin

This is a photo taken with the phone's 3x interpolating zoom and then cropped to about one-third of the original. So pretty demanding manipulation for a small sensor device, perhaps.


dsc-0001-20140213145228746.jpg

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keithh e2
11 23.4k 33 Wallis And Futuna
13 Feb 2014 8:07PM
There you go you see.



Lovely and squashy as well. Those old style cameras better look out! Wink
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
13 Feb 2014 10:52PM
Absolutely, certainly beats those old 6mp Doors some of you pros used to make money with! Grin
discreetphoton e2
10 3.5k 20 United Kingdom
13 Feb 2014 11:04PM
I'm not worried Wink Two years this thread's been running, and I can't see any reason to swap my DSLR for a phone yet.
strawman e2
11 22.0k 16 United Kingdom
13 Feb 2014 11:15PM
Nail on head there. I think we are lucky. Camera phones have reached a point of development they give decent photo's, but many will answer that the handling and responses of a custom designed photo taking device give advantages, even if sometimes the advantage is just in the photo taking experience. We are at a point where it is still reasonable to be able to use film cameras at a reasonable cost to take photo's.

in short we are spoiled, it is possible to use many devices to take decent quality images, pick the one you like the best Smile

As amateurs we are lucky, unless you are trying to sell said skills/services, when you may point out it is thin pickings for many people.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
14 Feb 2014 12:46AM

Quote:I'm not worried Wink Two years this thread's been running, and I can't see any reason to swap my DSLR for a phone yet.


Not really the point. The generation which has been clutching camera phones whilst still in the cradle, will find it baffling why on earth anyone would want a device that can do nothing but take photos ("like grandpa's camera thing").

If demand for cameras falls much further the economics of making them will, inevitably, come under scrutiny. They could end up as a niche product.... like large format film cameras and turntables for vinyl records. And probably rather expensive.

I own a system camera with several lenses, a compact, a camcorder and two camera phones. Admission: I very rarely use a camera phone to take pictures! Which may seem strange coming from someone who started this thread. However, I am 'old skool' as are most EPZers and I'm not representative of the camera-buying (or increasingly not buying) public.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
14 Feb 2014 1:09AM
A bit of shallow DoF, taken with the phone here . Smile
discreetphoton e2
10 3.5k 20 United Kingdom
14 Feb 2014 6:29AM
I bought my first mobile phone in 1998. Sixteen years ago. When I sold my first DSLR two years ago, it was bought by a 16 year old, one of the generation you just described.
I think you're selling young people a bit short there, there seems to be plenty of interest from that end the demographic. We've had three under twenties join our camera club in the last month.
There's something about the creation of tangible memories that seems to appeal to people. Perhaps that's why people still paint and draw. Not sure I'd say those are niche activities.

Now show us a shallow depth shot taken over some distance, and without you in the frame Wink There are some things phones just can't do.
keithh e2
11 23.4k 33 Wallis And Futuna
14 Feb 2014 8:23AM

Quote:
Absolutely, certainly beats those old 6mp Doors some of you pros used to make money with!



Do you know what, CB, even though that was back in 2001, I'd still go head to head with a D1x and show it up.
Coast e2
6 1.5k 292 United Kingdom
14 Feb 2014 9:16AM

Quote:I bought my first mobile phone in 1998. Sixteen years ago. When I sold my first DSLR two years ago, it was bought by a 16 year old, one of the generation you just described.
I think you're selling young people a bit short there, there seems to be plenty of interest from that end the demographic. We've had three under twenties join our camera club in the last month.
There's something about the creation of tangible memories that seems to appeal to people. Perhaps that's why people still paint and draw. Not sure I'd say those are niche activities.

Now show us a shallow depth shot taken over some distance, and without you in the frame Wink There are some things phones just can't do.



A view I share - I have had a number of younger people including Daughter's boyfriend, Nieces x3 and several from work who have asked for advice on and subsequently bought DSLR or CSC; their original interest sparked from starting to capture the world around them on their camera phones. I think the casual snapper who may have bought a digital compact will be less inclined to where the camera on their phone gives them what they need. So it may be compact camera sales that ultimately decline in time.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
14 Feb 2014 10:36AM
Sales of ALL types of camera have fallen already. Compacts have fared worst, but sales of interchangeable-lens cameras have also dropped. Sales of camera phones have skyrocketed.

The trend is downwards for devices which can't do a anything other than take photos. The camcorder market has fared even worse, and some sites/forums dedicated to them have shut down.

I maintain that the evidence suggests image-only devices are on course to become niche products.

It's not the end of the world! Wink We should be pleased that photography has become part of everyday life.
keithh e2
11 23.4k 33 Wallis And Futuna
14 Feb 2014 11:08AM
Sales of Camera Phones haven't skyrocketed. What has skyrocketed is the sale of Smart Phones and phones that contain a camera.

I wonder how many people, kids particularly, place much consideration on how good the camera is or it's technical spec. They assume it's got one and they'll use it to take photos because it's in their pocket but they don't buy a camera which happens to have a phone attached do they.

Phones also play games but people still buy a PS4. I'm afraid that as a predictor of the future, CB, you will always be the man who foresaw the death of FX digital cameras. Wink
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
14 Feb 2014 12:17PM

Quote: Sales of Camera Phones haven't skyrocketed.
What has skyrocketed is the sale of Smart Phones
and phones that contain a camera.



Happy Valentines Day! Grin

I see it is also Semantics Day. Tongue Actually you are kinda making my point for me. Multimedia devices are, seemingly, the way forward.

Let me give an analogy. Back in 2003, the year I joined EPZ, I treated myself to a reasonably decent hifi set up. The CD player alone cost into four figures. A couple of years later I bought an iPod and plugged that into the system. Now the iPod has been ditched and I simply plug in my phone, which contains my music collection.

The CD player has not been switched on for about a year. Do I claim the phone gives as good audio as the CD player? Of course not! But it is a lot more convenient.

And that is the ethos of the present age.
answersonapostcard e2
10 12.7k 15 United Kingdom
14 Feb 2014 12:42PM
Not sure they are the way forward, just another tool depending on your wants and needs. You can view TV on mobiles too, stream video too, dont think I'll replace the TV though - in fact they are getting bigger!

Still like my Kenwood player more than the ipod, I find the ipod too much of a faff - especially getting getting itunes to not only sync properly but in an event where I had to reformat my hard drive lot all my library on the laptop, back up on another drive didnt work.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
14 Feb 2014 1:24PM
I too got fed up with the iPod. Also it became just another thing you need to keep charged... which applies to cameras as well, of course.

I recall a recent survey which showed that, for the first time in decades, children are watching less TV. Not a cause for celebration though - because they spend their time peering at the small screens of their phones and tablets!

So, in the longer term, the seemingly unassailable position of the television as a primary entertainment/information device may also be in doubt.

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