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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214397 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 2:26 AM


Quote: No problem he said, and he gave me a prescription for Zyban

I`ve had a love/hate relationship with tobacco for a fair few years, I once stopped for about six months following a course of Zyban, then started again a few months after a pretty bad accident.

I was recovering from multiple fractures and feeling pretty sorry for myself, one day I fancied a cigar, before I knew it I was back on the fags.

I recently sat and watched my mother die from COPD, not nice, I must try harder.

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27 Jan 2013 - 2:26 AM

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StrayCat
StrayCat  1014210 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 7:09 AM

Paul, I wish you all the best, the key is you need to really want to quit.

I think I would have quit back in 1968. I had gone 2 weeks and was getting along fine, then got stranded in a tiny village on the coast of Labrador. The fog settled in for several days, and I was getting bushed. I phoned my wife on the radio-telephone, and she told me the doctors were going to take off my mother's leg due to a diabetic ulser. I was back on the fags so fast, it'd make your head spin. I got home about a week later. They managed to save her leg. The next time I got serious about quitting was 31 years later.

StrayCat
StrayCat  1014210 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 7:27 AM


Quote: Would i ever give up smoking, no, not a chance, I enjoy it, I've never smoked a cigarette and found it didn't work, its always been a pleasure, all be it a small one.

I enjoyed smoking also, because it's a chemical based drug that I was addicted to. Nobody would smoke if it didn't give some sort of pleasure. I'll say here that I also gave up drinking alcohol at the same time I quit smoking, what pleasures were left? I get my highs off fresh air and excercise now, and I feel better for it.

I still believe that quitting helps improve ones quality of life immensely, no matter who you are.

collywobles
27 Jan 2013 - 6:42 PM


Quote: Would i ever give up smoking, no, not a chance,

You might if you saw the black liquid that my father used to cough up and the litre of it drained from his lungs every couple of months...... he enjoyed smoking too!

hobbo
hobbo e2 Member 3737 forum postshobbo vcard England1 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 8:23 PM

Just to put things into perspective.......

I was called out to my brothers house this morning, he has been a heavy smoker for years, even continuing to smoke after developing throat cancer and losing his larynx 15 years ago ...... There was an emergency ambulance outside, he was in the capable hands of the ambulance crew who had him wired up to heart monitors, it wasn't good, his pulse was erratic and he looked dreadful.....worst of all he has a massive blood clot on his swollen arm, this could break up and kill him at any time or give him a disabling stroke, his legs are twice normal size, the walls of his house are literally sticky with nicotine.....As I arrived he was signing a release firm for the crew because he had flatly refused to be hospitalised.....even I couldn't persuade him ( he can't smoke in hospital) .......one of the paramedics had made him five roll- ups because my brother was having problems because of his extremely painful arm.......To give the crew credit they waited outside for half an hour as I did my best to get him to go with them......he wouldn't go, so he has chosen to continue sitting in his armchair, in agony smoking roll- ups........I will check up on him in the morning and wait in for the community nurse who will take care of his health needs only....he refuses all offers of help to clean up or redecorate......... I have witnessed five other close family members suffer in almost the same way.....no wonder I detest smoking.......I feel so frustrated.....

Hobbo

KevSB
KevSB  101390 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 8:40 PM

Not sure how you define enjoying, if you means taking drugs to stimulate your adrenaline as that's exactly what it is that's cigarettes do, I would define enjoyment as doing something you choose to do.
As much as a smoker says he chooses it is the chemical addiction that makes not having one almost impossible. As an ex smoker I totally understand, as a non smoker I now know that the quality of life is great without them.

Last Modified By KevSB at 27 Jan 2013 - 8:41 PM
User_Removed
27 Jan 2013 - 9:00 PM


Quote: its always been a pleasure

Part of the "pleasure" you get from cigarettes is the welcome relief from the withdrawal symptoms you are experiencing when the nicotine hit from your previous cigarette runs out. Break the chain.

Smokers are amongst the few drug addicts who constantly carry (at all times) a packet containing up to twenty hits of the drug they are addicted to.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214397 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 9:07 PM


Quote: Not sure how you define enjoying, if you means taking drugs to stimulate your adrenaline as that's exactly what it is that's cigarettes do

Sounds a bit like a chap I know, he wants had a strange addiction for electric shocks Smile

paulcookphotography

I started smoking about 20 years ago, but wouldn't say i was ever a 'heavy' smoker. More of a social smoker i guess (if i was out for a beer or whatever). I have stopped once or twice over the years, sometimes for a couple of years, but eventually ended up starting again for one reason or another.

However, i recently decided enough was enough and it was time to stop, hopefully this time for good. The money i would normally have spent on cigarettes (i would buy maybe 2 packs a week at most) is better spent on my daughter (as extra pocket money or whatever) and thats my main incentive. Its only been 3 weeks since my last smoke, but so far so good. No urges or cravings that i couldn't easily deal with. That said, i do believe you can only quit if you really want to. I've always known the risks and health issues but never really wanted to stop before. Not seriously at least

Last Modified By paulcookphotography at 27 Jan 2013 - 10:03 PM
LVanDhal
LVanDhal  1126 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 11:18 PM


Quote: Not sure how you define enjoying, if you means taking drugs to stimulate your adrenaline as that's exactly what it is that's cigarettes do

Sounds a bit like a chap I know, he wants had a strange addiction for electric shocks Smile

ECT is still used today as a treatment for treatment resistant depression, so i suppose an electric shock must have its positive points.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214397 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 11:26 PM

Lol maybe I should give it a go Smile

LVanDhal
LVanDhal  1126 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 11:41 PM


Quote: Just to put things into perspective.......

I was called out to my brothers house this morning, he has been a heavy smoker for years, even continuing to smoke after developing throat cancer and losing his larynx 15 years ago ...... There was an emergency ambulance outside, he was in the capable hands of the ambulance crew who had him wired up to heart monitors, it wasn't good, his pulse was erratic and he looked dreadful.....worst of all he has a massive blood clot on his swollen arm, this could break up and kill him at any time or give him a disabling stroke, his legs are twice normal size, the walls of his house are literally sticky with nicotine.....As I arrived he was signing a release firm for the crew because he had flatly refused to be hospitalised.....even I couldn't persuade him ( he can't smoke in hospital) .......one of the paramedics had made him five roll- ups because my brother was having problems because of his extremely painful arm.......To give the crew credit they waited outside for half an hour as I did my best to get him to go with them......he wouldn't go, so he has chosen to continue sitting in his armchair, in agony smoking roll- ups........I will check up on him in the morning and wait in for the community nurse who will take care of his health needs only....he refuses all offers of help to clean up or redecorate......... I have witnessed five other close family members suffer in almost the same way.....no wonder I detest smoking.......I feel so frustrated.....

Hobbo

I am so sorry to read that Hobbo it sounds like a very difficult time for you and your brother.
I wonder if he is severely depressed and that is keeping him from agreeing to admission to hospital ?
maybe he refuses all offers of help because deep down he would then have to admit how bad things are, and that he is not able by himself to solve them? from my own experience I can tell you it is very humiliating admitting to yourself that you cannot cope and need others to do things that ordinarily you think you would be able to do for yourself.
You can as a relative ask the community nurses to do a mental health assessment, but in all fairness to your brother it is something he should be agreeable too rather than it being imposed on him, ( he will most likely be stubbornly defiant other wise)
If you think I can be of any help then don't hesitate to message me.
kindest regards

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214397 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
27 Jan 2013 - 11:47 PM


Quote: Paul, I wish you all the best, the key is you need to really want to quit

I`ve been at that point more times than I can remember Denny, maybe on previous occasions I was not quite ready so failed.

StrayCat
StrayCat  1014210 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
28 Jan 2013 - 1:57 AM

Hobbo, I know how frustrating it can be, and I sympathise with you. I have tried for years to get my sister to quit smoking, and drinking rum and coke. She works in the lab in a hospital, and she claims she knows what her habits are doing to her, yet she doesn't put any effort into getting better. She has been in hospital now for 2 months, toes amputated because of blocked arteries, large sections of arteries replaced. She's lost over 100 lbs, and she has to learn to walk again. I talked to her yesterday, and she said she can't wait to get home, so she can smoke and drink. What can you do?

KevSB
KevSB  101390 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
28 Jan 2013 - 7:43 AM

I listen to what you 2 are having to endure and makes me so much more determined never to let it get to me again.
I don't like being the stereotypical non smoker but its story's like this that make it so justified even if it that makes just 1 person stop, and shows its not just smoker that is the victim, but those around them.

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