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Bang Head Here - A Rant


RavenTepes 5 199 United States
6 Jul 2013 3:52AM
I've just spent the past 2 weeks editing photos for a wedding I have the privilege to shoot. Roughly 1000 images between 2 photographers. Last night when I finished the last image, I decided I was too tired to worry about burning the disk, so I figured I'd wait until I got off of work today, burn the disk and deliver it. Big mistake.

When I got home, I opened the folder containing all final products as I was going to copy and paste them into my burning software. When I opened the folder though, all the work was gone. I started looking through every folder I could think of that I had created in the past couple weeks, finding absolutely nothing. So I checked my Recycle Bin. Bingo. I found them. I just put everything back into their original folders, hoping I'd find the rest (I had about 9GB worth of deleted stuff in my bin). No luck. All the work I had done (some which needed extensive re-touching) was essentially gone. Fortunately, I have my original RAW files, but not nearly the time to devote to them as I had for the past couple of weeks. Right now, I just don't have the energy to start going back through them all.

At this point, I'm glad it was a freebie. Had it been paid work, I'd probably be crying right about now. What does one do in this situation?

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6 Jul 2013 4:12AM
You had your JPGs accidentally thrown away? What happened to the originals (whatever you had) and what software did you use? Because if it was Lightroom or any other nondestructive editing suite your work will still be there, and all you will need to render new JPGs. If you used something else (what?) - bad luck, big work needs proper process organisation provided by suitable software capable to deal with it.
Ade_Osman e2
11 4.5k 36 England
6 Jul 2013 4:54AM

Quote:At this point, I'm glad it was a freebie. Had it been paid work, I'd probably be crying right about now. What does one do in this situation?


Make daily back ups and never format the memory cards until I've finished processing the particular batch!.......Situation will never arise Smile
Gundog 1 624 Scotland
6 Jul 2013 9:31AM
If you had been a professional, you certainly could not have said, "Right now, I just don't have the energy to start going back through them all." That's exactly what you would have had to have done.

However, as suggested above, if you use Lightroom, you will be able to re-export with all your edits quite easily.
brian1208 e2
11 10.6k 12 United Kingdom
6 Jul 2013 9:38AM

Quote:What does one do in this situation?


Shout and scream at the computer, blame everyone else for having stolen the files - then remember that I always keep a copy of everything on at least one additional external hard-drive Grin
saxon_image 10 285 United Kingdom
6 Jul 2013 10:51AM
If they were saved then they ought to be on the drive somewhere! Quite possibly the containing folder has been accidentally dragged into a neighbour (on Win7) - my other half seems to manage this with monotonous regularity. I'm assuming that you have tried a search on file names but if not worth a go. As others have said - if it's important back it up - twice! Hope the missing files turn up.
thewilliam 6 4.8k
6 Jul 2013 11:10AM
Those of us who depend on our computer files for a living have carefully defined Standard Operating Procedures. Or at least the sensible ones do. Backups are made at every stage so we're only going to lose a few minutes work at the most.

Inadvertent dragging and dropping is easily done, especially when we're tired. Do a search on the file or folder names of the images that you've lost.

Finally, remember there are 2 kinds of hard drive: those that are going to fail and those that have already failed!
Newdevonian 2 452 United Kingdom
6 Jul 2013 5:01PM
In the days of film and print, I had a wedding order for two foam board backed 20 x 16"'s for framing and three leather albums, all different, one for the couple and one each for both sets of parents, plus many separate prints for guests. I had agreed the crops from the proof prints, with everybody and was assembling the albums with the agreed prints. The last print in the last album, at 2 am on a Saturday morning, I guillotined off the top of a head, rather than reducing the torso. Agghh!!

I had promised these for the Sunday morning. My normal, very good processor had gone home for the weekend and I had to resort to Boots for one reprint. It was a totally different colour! I placed it loose in the album and explained. The family thought it was all very funny and allowed me to replace the print the following week.

Moral: beware when working when tired. Things go wrong!!!!!!

Things were different then. I think I charged 1600 for that one job, 20 years ago.
JJGEE 9 6.4k 18 England
6 Jul 2013 5:23PM

Quote:It was a totally different colour! I placed it loose in the album and explained

Presumably that was the key to their understanding, you was " up front " and explained and I am sure most people would not mind waiting a few days for the replacement of just 1 print.
6 Jul 2013 10:14PM

Quote:I've just spent the past 2 weeks editing photos for a wedding I have the privilege to shoot. Roughly 1000 images between 2 photographers.


I'm not being facetious, but does anyone need 1000 images of a wedding? Is 300 - 400 not ample?
Jestertheclown 6 6.6k 242 England
6 Jul 2013 11:15PM

Quote:Roughly 1000 images between 2 photographers.

Presumably photographer No.2 had no hand in the editing?
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
6 Jul 2013 11:15PM
We used to get by with just half a dozen rolls of film or less, then spent a nervous few days waiting for the results from the lab Smile

There was just so much that could go wrong that you had no control over, films getting lost, negatives and prints going wrong at the processing stage etc.

Nothing ever did go wrong, but it was all at the back of your mind.
RavenTepes 5 199 United States
7 Jul 2013 5:46PM

Quote:Roughly 1000 images between 2 photographers.
Presumably photographer No.2 had no hand in the editing?



You would be right, sir! The other photographer just made the jump to digital after shooting on film for her whole life. I've been trying to find time to teach her some basics in Photoshop.

I really just don't know what happened. I do wonder, since I'm a sleepwalker, if I had done something in my sleep. It'd make sense, since I ended up finding some photos in some weird places, which helps, but I still can't account for the rest.

All in all, a big lesson was learned through all this. While I've never had a problem in the past, this taught me to BACK UP EVERYTHING!!!And it doesn't matter how tired I am. When I'm done with a project, just burn the disk. It only takes a few minutes.
RavenTepes 5 199 United States
7 Jul 2013 5:49PM

Quote:We used to get by with just half a dozen rolls of film or less, then spent a nervous few days waiting for the results from the lab Smile

There was just so much that could go wrong that you had no control over, films getting lost, negatives and prints going wrong at the processing stage etc.

Nothing ever did go wrong, but it was all at the back of your mind.



Don't start giving me ideas...I've been strongly considering getting a Nikon F6, but as workflow would be strange to integrate it, I've decided to hold onto that thought until I can come up with a better reason other than "I want one". It'd at least be better than my manual focus Minolta X-700...
Term 9 85 9 England
15 Jul 2013 9:13PM

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