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Basic kit must haves


Paul Morgan 14 16.6k 6 England
31 Oct 2012 8:01PM
His mum told me he had a thing about dogs, so I had him sat on one (not real)

But then I couldn`t get his attention, so I stuck a wolf mask on, grabbed this before he stood up and ran towards me, 5 minutes earlier he couldn`t walk.

I ended up capturing his first steps as well, mum loved them Smile

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miptog 9 3.5k 61 United Kingdom
31 Oct 2012 8:19PM

Quote:You have a lovely p.f with the kit you have......


Second that
31 Oct 2012 10:48PM

Quote:
Another thing I have been in the market for is some sort of flash/speedlight. I have been looking at Yongnuo ones, basically due to budget, but see that they get varying reviews- so again, not sure whether it is best to stick to nikon?



I'm currently awaiting delivery of a YongNuo 560 flash gun which cost me 33 post free. My other flash is a Nikon SB800 which cost more! I need the YongNuo primarily for lighting a backdrop, but it looks like it's capable of lots more. I have a YongNuo remote shutter release which works OK and was also very cheap, so I'm happy enough with that make of gear.
Alex.
Sooty_1 4 1.4k 213 United Kingdom
31 Oct 2012 11:20PM
Don't spend any money on other peoples' say so.

Determine if you have a gap in your equipment that you cannot get round another way. If you need or want shallow depth of field, you might need a lens with a wider aperture, otherwise you will gain little by buying a 50mm if you already cover that focal length.

If you need stability, then it's a tripod.
If you need hand holdability in low light, then it's a fast lens (85 f/1.8 is much dearer than 50 f/1.8).
If you need shallow DoF, then it's a fast lens.
If you need light in dark places, or to freeze action, then it's a flash.
If you want extreme close-up, it's a macro lens (expensive), filters (cheap), bellows(awkward) or ext tubes (middle!).

When you find you are being prevented from getting a particular shot by a lack of equipment, then you can assess whether you need to spend money. As said, you are doing pretty well with what you have.

Nick
CDSINUK 2 223 England
31 Oct 2012 11:47PM
elements 10 or lightroom, if you cant get out you can do some pretty freaky stuff with good editing software, its stopped me ripping my hair out when i cant get away from home to shoot Smile not everyone likes it but it will help with creativitySmile
Paul Morgan 14 16.6k 6 England
1 Nov 2012 12:12AM

Quote:If you need light in dark places, or to freeze action, then it's a flash


Kids and shooting indoors puts a flash at the top of the list, far more useful than a second lens.

Kit lenses are also underrated and are thought of as being inferior but with practice they can become really quite capable.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
1 Nov 2012 9:48AM

Quote:50mm lenses are a waste of time, you never use them..


Well, well, well. Chris never was one to hold back from a controversial statement!

If he had said "I never use them" rather than the ludicrous "you never use them", his statement might have been slightly more believable.

Wink
Carabosse Plus
12 39.7k 269 England
1 Nov 2012 9:52AM
50mm lenses on APS-C or M4/3 sensor cameras can make decent portrait lenses.

But on FF, I'm not sure they are all that useful. Even going back to the olden days of film, I can recall my 50mm lens being the one I used least on my SLR.
User_Removed 11 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
1 Nov 2012 9:58AM

Quote:his statement might have been slightly more believable.


What percentage of pictures in your portfolio are shot with your 50mm lens then LeftForum? Wink
779HOB 3 1.1k United Kingdom
1 Nov 2012 9:58AM

Quote:But on FF, I'm not sure they are all that useful.


I must be the only person who thinks a 50mm on a FF is a good combination. I guess it just works well for how I shot. I would say that my 17-35mm is getting more and more use now though.
User_Removed 11 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
1 Nov 2012 10:06AM
LeftForum, you should sell your 50mm lens. Not one picture from it has made it through to your portfolio

Like me, you love your zooms Smile

Has anybody who suggested buying a 50mm lens got many pictures from one in their portfolio? Wink
779HOB 3 1.1k United Kingdom
1 Nov 2012 10:26AM

Quote:Has anybody who suggested buying a 50mm lens got many pictures from one in their portfolio?


No, but then I don't have many pics in my portfolio here.
Sooty_1 4 1.4k 213 United Kingdom
1 Nov 2012 10:32AM
I don't have anything in my portfolio! I do use a 50 quite a lot though....with one camera system I have, they don't sell zooms. Usual carry round kit is a body + 50mm, second body with 35mm (maybe different film) and a 90mm in the bag.

Using a single focal length is a good exercise. It makes you look for the picture, rather than shooting what appears in front of you and zooming to frame up. But it's only worth it if it gives you something you can't get with your existing kit.

Nick
Briwooly 9 452 5 England
1 Nov 2012 11:17AM
Hi Nic as you will already have read everyone as a different opinion and advice all be it mostly good. So the only thing I would add is look at others work you might admire check out what they are using research any kit you might need and don't panic buy my wife would kill me if she new how much I had wasted on kit that I have not used or its been wrong so if you want something,far better to save and get what you really want than to buy only to upgrade in the near future enjoy what you have and move slowly but with confidence.

Brian.....,........
Carabosse Plus
12 39.7k 269 England
1 Nov 2012 3:42PM

Quote:I am pretty new to DSLR photography, no formal qualification or long term experience- just enjoy taking photos. I have recently had a Nikon D3000 brought for me (Its a starting point!) and am looking at trying to collect a bit of "kit"


Going back to the initial post, you may well find that what may seem like a 'must have' now, may gather dust after a couple of years - as you explore photography and your needs change as your direction changes. So don't load yourself up with too much.

When you find you are banging up against the limitations of your kit, that is the best time to start adding to it. Collecting kit, on the off-chance you might need it, is the road to ruin. Lol! Wink

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