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    Mollycat
    Mollycat e2 Member 1Mollycat vcard United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
    3 Sep 2013 - 11:42 AM

    As a newcomer to photography. Im currently using a Fuji 300 bridge camera. I would like to move up to a SLR, but with limited funds. What camera would you suggest. Thanking you in advance for any suggestions.

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    pulsar69
    pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
    3 Sep 2013 - 11:52 AM

    It would depend on your future wishes and if you think you might take it further in the future. I started out on Pentax cameras and i would say that for a beginner they offer the best bang for buck all the way through to advanced amatuer , if found when i started on the road to going pro that the lens choices and high end feature lead me to the canon / nikon camp but i do not regret starting off with pentax at all and highly recommend you look at their range of DSLRs and work out what your budget will get you and then just go for it.

    icphoto
    icphoto  131343 forum posts England
    3 Sep 2013 - 12:49 PM

    First set you maximum budget you can spend. Remember you may need to factor in additional items to the camera to use it i.e. memory card etc. Next pop into your local camera shop and try them all 'hands on', what one person likes you may not, as some feel different in the hand to others. As for which brand is best, well nowadays at the beginner level I would say all are possibly evenly matched, its up to you, go for it!Wink

    JackAllTog
    JackAllTog e2 Member 53584 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
    3 Sep 2013 - 1:20 PM

    Go to a shop and hold a few to see what you like, they are all very capable and its hard to make a bad choice.

    whatriveristhis
    whatriveristhis e2 Member 163 forum postswhatriveristhis vcard England71 Constructive Critique Points
    30 Oct 2013 - 9:24 AM

    Depends what you mean by "limited."
    As you're already familiar with the way Fuji do things, it might be worth looking at one of their models from higher in the range, possibly one of their "Mirrorless" models, if your finances can stretch to that. They can match SLRs for value and quality, certainly up to mid-range.
    I use Panasonic kit, but I know Fuji make superb cameras, and it takes a lot to beat Fujinon lenses. ....Just a thought.


    Alan

    cats_123
    cats_123 e2 Member 104014 forum postscats_123 vcard Northern Ireland25 Constructive Critique Points
    30 Oct 2013 - 11:46 AM

    I've been using a Nikon D60 for a few years now (sinc upgrading from a bridge). It has served me well and there are still models available. I am starting to think about upgrading and feeling very confused with all the model nos available. I found my way to Wikipedia and found a long list of all the DSLRs with issue dates and whether they are discontinued or not. No doubt you will find the same for other brands.

    Unless you've got a particular genre in mind, it's really all about budget...and feel.......don't forget there's a whole world of `used' or `refurbished' cameras out there (Amazon gives you an idea of the prices). You can buy kits with standard 18-55 lens but also body only...lenses are a different matter and can be expensive, but there are manufacturers such as Sigma and Tamron (there are others) who make lenses to fit most DSLRs.

    (Grays of Westminster have a web page dedicated to second hand Nikons). They even tell you the number of `actuations'.

    Good Luck Smile

    letooms
    letooms  637 forum posts United Kingdom
    3 Nov 2013 - 11:19 PM


    Quote: I've been using a Nikon D60 for a few years now (sinc upgrading from a bridge). It has served me well and there are still models available. I am starting to think about upgrading and feeling very confused with all the model nos available. I found my way to Wikipedia and found a long list of all the DSLRs with issue dates and whether they are discontinued or not. No doubt you will find the same for other brands.

    Unless you've got a particular genre in mind, it's really all about budget...and feel.......don't forget there's a whole world of `used' or `refurbished' cameras out there (Amazon gives you an idea of the prices). You can buy kits with standard 18-55 lens but also body only...lenses are a different matter and can be expensive, but there are manufacturers such as Sigma and Tamron (there are others) who make lenses to fit most DSLRs.

    (Grays of Westminster have a web page dedicated to second hand Nikons). They even tell you the number of `actuations'.

    Good Luck Smile

    I'm with you on this one, I started with a D60 when I first made the leap to a digital SLR and would still recommend them now as great starter camera. There are hundreds on auction sites all the time just remember to buy from a respectable seller.

    MattK
    MattK e2 Member 263 forum postsMattK vcard United Kingdom
    4 Nov 2013 - 12:21 AM

    It all depends on your budget to be honest. My first DSLR was a Canon 600D which is a great DSLR to start off with for a number of reasons:

    1) The menus are easily laid out which makes finding all the functions easy - each function when you scroll onto it/get to it also has a little description on the screen telling you a basic outline of what it does which I found REALLY useful when I first got involved with DSLR photography! It makes the learning curve that little more gentle. Depending on your experience aperture, ISO, shutter speed etc can confuse you when you start out!

    2) For 389 in Curry's it is extremely good value IMO

    3) The image quality is really good - 18 MP is more than enough and it has a flip out screen that you can move and tilt - very useful for creative shots! The majority of photos in my portfolio were taken on this camera

    4) It has all the functionality you will need to keep you going for quite some time. It has full manual mode as well as shutter priority (TV mode on canons - for fast moving objects/action shots) and Aperture priority (AV mode on Canons) for shots such as portraits. It also has the more basic modes like full auto and P if you want to pretty much point and shoot. I fully recommend using AV and TV as much as possible then moving onto full manual to get the most out of the camera and building your skills!

    downsides...

    for me there are few downsides to the 600D for someone starting out in DSLR photography. It has heaps of functionality for a good price but if you want to photograph action then it could be that the 600D is not for you. It shoots at 3.9 frames per second so is hardly blistering but I have shot plenty of pet action shots and sports with it and it has been absolutely fine - I just had to be more careful rather than just holding down the shutter and hoping one out of 100 would be great!

    I can only recommend what I have used, but the Canon 600D is a fab camera and I would recommend it to anyone looking for their first step into the DSLR world.

    I do not know about Nikons so i will leave it to others to recommend the best in their range for you. Like others have suggested though, the second hand market could allow you to get a better spec camera for the same price.

    If I were you I would decide what type of photography you like best and interests you most (landscapes, sports/action, portraits etc) and research cameras that are designed for that type of use.

    There are so many cameras on the market now because manufacturers have bought out models geared towards certain types of photographers rather than building one camera that is amazing at everything and simply improves on the model before it. Some will have fantastic FPS for action photographers whereas others will have low FPS but great ability to work in low light which will appeal to different people.

    Think about what you like photographing and do lots of research on different cameras that suit your needs. Then go out to the shops and try them out!

    Just bear in mind that most DSLR cameras now are pretty damn good but it is important to get decent lenses. A rubbish lens on a good camera will really stifle the potential of the quality of image you will get. Investing money in lenses is just as important as the body! It is expensive though so that investment will take time!

    hope this helps.

    Last Modified By MattK at 4 Nov 2013 - 12:24 AM
    MichaelMelb_AU

    I would caution you on jumping into DSLR pool. Certainly not with limited budget.
    While you may afford a starter combo of a camera and two half-decent lens that cover much lesser focus range than your current L300, getting even with superzoom versatility in DSLR department is so expensive that I chose to buy a...superzoom for those of my amateur images that really need some reach. So now I own a couple of DSLRs and Fujifilm HS30EXR.

    But it looks like you have outgrown your current camera, and there's good advice above about the way to go. If you need to keep that huge zoom you better consider upgrading to X-S1 or HS50EXR. X-S1 can be bought quite cheap these days as it seems to be discontinued by Fujifilm in favour of HS50, but its larger sensor makes it superior camera notwithstanding. And if you feel optics related limitations of long zoom - than maybe you are ready for a DSLR after all. Save the money than - it won't come cheap.

    What is it you need from this upgrade anyway? That's the question anyone (me included) should have asked first probablySmile

    Last Modified By MichaelMelb_AU at 6 Nov 2013 - 7:17 AM
    g_par
    g_par  7 United Kingdom
    24 Nov 2013 - 8:53 AM

    If you are a beginner, why are you looking to upgrade so soon? My advice is to stick with the camera you have and concentrate on using it to its fullest. So few photographers get the most out of their camera these days and think upgrading to the next model or moving up to a DSLR will improve their photography. It won't. The camera doesn't take the picture, the photographer does.

    Work with the limitations of your camera and I guarantee you'll see improvements in your photography. Learning to work with your current camera means that when you are ready to upgrade, you will then learn to work with the limitations of your new camera.

    KenTaylor
    KenTaylor e2 Member 92980 forum postsKenTaylor vcard United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Nov 2013 - 11:13 AM

    Such is the power of marketing.
    My caution is that even the highest end camera will only deliver better technical quality where with limited funding is better shelved.

    Paul Morgan
    Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315182 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Nov 2013 - 7:24 PM

    With only a small budget have a look at the second hand CSC market, plenty of choices for all budgets, with deals like this.

    http://www.lcegroup.co.uk/Used/Olympus-EP-2-+-17mm-+-FLASH_82501.html
    http://www.lcegroup.co.uk/Secondhand-Search/?SHMake=&SHModel=&SHType=Com...

    Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 24 Nov 2013 - 7:28 PM
    RavenTepes
    28 Nov 2013 - 6:39 PM

    If I were to scrap my whole DSLR system and start over, I'd go mirrorless (CSC) all the way.

    One thing to keep in mind is buying a DSLR or a CSC system isn't as simple as just buying a camera. You're buying into an investment. It's a future, and the camera body you get will determine what additional lenses and accessories you can buy later down the road. In terms of going with a CSC, thus far, after hours upon hours of research and physically holding random cameras and playing with them, I'm inclined to go with Olympus and Panasonic's Micro 4/3 system, because it's just that; A system. I'm not impressed by any offering from Nikon or Canon, which is a bit surprising because they lead the DSLR market. (And I'm a Nikon fanboy with no desire to move to a different company for DSLRs) The image quality is just lacking. Unfortunately, even as good as Fuji is (I rate them as highly as I do Olympus, actually), they don't have a lot of available lenses, hence I'm hesitant to invest into them. Though Sony is good, they just plain can't make up their minds what they want to do, so I'd stay away from that mess entirely. That leaves Olympus and Panasonic. Of the two, I prefer Olympus. I like the image quality, and they handle fairly decently. I won't go as far as saying Panasonic isn't worth it...they are. I just prefer the Olympus over the Panasonic. I'll be the first to say that I have higher standards in image quality than most people. I'm a portrait and wedding photographer, professionally, so naturally, I need the best that I can afford. And that's exactly something to keep in mind...choose the best that you can afford, and if you can't afford it now, save up. I actually ran across a nice quote today concerning just that.

    "If you really want a certain thing, buy it. If you don't and you go with the lesser, sure you'll be happy, but deep inside you will always wish you had your top choice. We're not here forever, live a little." - Author Unknown

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