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best lens for landscape work

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    jingler
    jingler  3
    29 Dec 2010 - 5:15 AM

    Hi all
    i need some advise on which lens to use for landscape work.
    at the moment i use the standard kit lens that came with my canon 550d (18-55 is) i also have a sigma 18-250 lens that i use as a walk about lens.
    any advise would be gratefully recieved

    tom

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    29 Dec 2010 - 5:15 AM

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    ZakBlack
    ZakBlack  6105 forum posts England14 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 8:27 AM

    I think you have most focal lengths you would ever need for landscape. If you are happy with the results of the 18-250 and have no problem lugging it around with you then stick with it. You have the ability to have a reasonably wide angle of view at the 18mm end and you can isolate interesting parts of the scene with the 250mm. If you find the 18mm not wide enough then the Sigma 10-20mm would complete your kit. I personally found the 10-20 too wide for my purposes so it sat in the bag, i eventually sold it to an epz member.....

    sherlob
    sherlob e2 Member 82324 forum postssherlob vcard United Kingdom125 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 9:35 AM

    Interesting pov from treebridge. Many landscapers like superwide lenses - your 18-55 will give a rough equ. of a 29mm lens which isn't that wide. The sigma 10-20 is super lens (based on independant reviews and popular opinion on here), and will give you a true super wide focal length. As with any kit the lens you opt for is only a tool - there is a learning curve with it, and you make like treebridge conclude that it does not suit your style of photography; certianly composition can be easier using less wide perspectives. Personally I like superwide perspectives and often shoot full frame at 17mm (nearly the same focal length you'd get on a sigma 10-20 using your camera). I know Canon & Tamron also do similar superwide lenses for cropped sensors, but the sigma seems to get the best of the reviews...

    Adam

    Nick_w
    Nick_w e2 Member 73878 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 9:48 AM

    Sigma 10-20 for a crop sensor you wont regret it

    Tandberg
    Tandberg  111218 forum posts England2 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 10:14 AM

    been using my ef 17-40 for years and wouldnt change it for the world.............well maybe a million pound or two
    dave

    MalcolmS
    MalcolmS e2 Member 91072 forum postsMalcolmS vcard England13 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 10:47 AM

    For a full frame camera the 17-40L can't be beaten in my opinion. However as you have a crop sensor the Sigma 10-20mm (full frame equivalent 16-32mm) is also unbeatable.

    Last Modified By MalcolmS at 29 Dec 2010 - 10:48 AM
    sitan1
    sitan1  6490 forum posts United Kingdom
    29 Dec 2010 - 11:56 AM

    My sigma 10-20 is on my camera so much I have now superglued it on as I love it so much. Grin

    randomrubble
    29 Dec 2010 - 12:37 PM

    'Course the problem with 10-20's and the like is that 'Landscape' often ends up being 'Foregroundscape*' Tongue

    (*a sea of rocks/seaweed/grass/blurry waves with a titular 'subject' occupying approx 2-5% of the frame)

    Briwooly
    Briwooly  8452 forum posts England5 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 12:56 PM


    Quote: For a full frame camera the 17-40L can't be beaten in my opinion. However as you have a crop sensor the Sigma 10-20mm (full frame equivalent 16-32mm) is also unbeatable.

    With Malcolm on this one my 17-40 rarely off my 50D

    Brian...........................................

    jingler
    jingler  3
    29 Dec 2010 - 5:05 PM

    Hi all
    Thank you for the replies and info, there is plenty to think about.
    Moving on from lenses would you recommend any filters for landscapes also what about a tripod?
    I also wonder if i am overcomplicating things and that I should just be out there taking photos

    Tom

    JJGEE
    JJGEE  96304 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 5:13 PM

    Yes, for landscapes a tripod is a good idea. It forces you to "slow down", allows one to fine tune the composition, adjust filters and then wait around for the light, people / cars to move out of the way etc without affecting the composition.
    A small accessory that is very useful is a spirit level bubble that fits into the camera hot shot... helps get horizons or verticals straight Wink

    MalcolmS
    MalcolmS e2 Member 91072 forum postsMalcolmS vcard England13 Constructive Critique Points
    29 Dec 2010 - 6:52 PM


    Quote: Moving on from lenses would you recommend any filters for landscapes also what about a tripod?

    For landscapes, a tripod is vital for best results in my opinion, enabling you to get maximum DOF by using slow speeds and large F values. This is even more important if you want to take shots of waterfalls.
    As for filters, a circular polariser to make the most of skies and still water and a range of graduated neutral filters to even out unbalanced light levels from sky and land in bright conditions. However, you can use PS, take seperate exposures for sky and land and combine them. This almost removes the need for grad. filters completely, but not the polariser.

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