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Bilderberg Conference


Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
7 Jun 2013 11:14AM
Have you been invited to this meeting ? Smile

The conference, funded by Goldman Sachs and BP, is being held in Watford this year. Amongst the 140 attendees, from 21 countries, are George Osborne, Ken Clarke, Ed Balls, Shirley Williams, Peter Mandelson (remember him?!), foreign politicians, heads of various multinationals and banks, senior academics - not to mention Henry Kissinger and the head of the IMF. Notably missing is anyone from Africa, Asia or the Middle East.

Should we at least ask the British politicans attending to report back to Parliament?

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JackAllTog e2
5 3.7k 58 United Kingdom
7 Jun 2013 1:07PM

Quote:Should we at least ask the British politicians attending to report back to Parliament?

Well that would lose them an invite for next year Wink

Lots of different groups meet in secret or with restricted memberships, from 2 people on a golf course to events like this. We'd all love to know what these many of these people say and plan, but we probably never will.

Better to keep the law of the land relevant, and the "cash for questions" type excesses minimised. Look to the long term and make sure we keep an eye out for good or bad trajectories.
spaceman 10 5.2k 3 Wales
7 Jun 2013 7:07PM
They keep inviting me even though I refuse to attend.
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
7 Jun 2013 8:25PM
I understand Margaret Thatcher refused to attend as well, so you are in good company. Grin

Cameron is, however, going as a guest.
answersonapostcard e2
10 12.6k 15 United Kingdom
7 Jun 2013 8:47PM
not that secret if they publish the guest list, is this like the Masons for much cleverer people..



oh hang on Ed Balls is on it Grin
Nick_w e2
7 3.9k 99 England
7 Jun 2013 9:00PM
David Ike has a lot to answer for, wasn't it one of his rants when he lost it?

I honestly can't see what's wrong with an industry dinner, anyone that has ever attended one will know its about networking, catching up with ex colleagues and friends and foes. So do we want our politicians to restrict everything they do just to the houses of parliament?
answersonapostcard e2
10 12.6k 15 United Kingdom
7 Jun 2013 9:03PM
quite, if they can have a bit of fun together maybe they'll be inclined to work together to help everyone else a bit more...



if ever there was a picture needing a quote though is the one of dear old George
Nick_w e2
7 3.9k 99 England
7 Jun 2013 10:14PM
Yes, what we often forget is that people can get on with others with opposing views. I think politics would be much healthier if there was more consensus, and true discussion (as opposed to Punch and Judy).

I often watch this Week, and all the politicians (well most Wink ) not matter which political persuasion seem to talk sense and you can tell that a lot of them actually get on, when they no longer have the political whip to think about.

It was quite telling a few weeks back when Portillo said the opposition weren't the real enemy, you only really have to confront them once every 4-5 years, the real enemy were on your own benches, as they are sticking the knife in every day.

But I agree there something about Georgie that doesn't fill you with confidence.
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
8 Jun 2013 1:07AM

Quote:not that secret if they publish the guest list


Apparently Bill & Hillary Clinton, together with David Rockefeller, have been photographed going into the Grove Hotel. There's obviously an appendix to the guest list to which the public have not been made privy. Lol! Wink


Quote:But I agree there something about Georgie that doesn't fill you with confidence.


One minute he and Ed Balls are at each others' throats in the Commons, the next they are snuggled together in a secret session.

The problem is, actually, the secrecy. Whilst it may be fair enough for detailed discussions to be under Chatham House rules, surely conclusions and outcomes - which may affect every one of us - should be published in some form? The politicians are in the taxpayers' employ: we have a right to demand information from them. I believe Michael Meacher is going to attempt to table a question - I hope he is successful, although I somehow doubt he will be.
Nick_w e2
7 3.9k 99 England
8 Jun 2013 5:30AM

Quote:The problem is, actually, the secrecy. Whilst it may be fair enough for detailed discussions to be under Chatham House rules, surely conclusions and outcomes - which may affect every one of us - should be published in some form? The politicians are in the taxpayers' employ: we have a right to demand information from them. I believe Michael Meacher is going to attempt to table a question - I hope he is successful, although I somehow doubt he will be.


Come in are you really saying they should have minutes for every conversation they ever have with anyone that could be remotely described as a politician or business associate? Just think about it, would any of us like to have to document every single conversation we had, with anyone that could be said to remotely affect the work we are in?
mdpontin 10 6.0k Scotland
8 Jun 2013 7:54AM

Quote:...are you really saying they should have minutes for every conversation they ever have with anyone that could be remotely described as a politician or business associate? Just think about it, would any of us like to have to document every single conversation we had, with anyone that could be said to remotely affect the work we are in?

I don't think that's what he suggested, simply that since our politicians supposedly work for us they should be accountable to us, and if decisions which may affect each and every one of us are made at events such as this, we're within our rights to expect to be know about it.

I can understand that there are times when being able to discuss things away from the glare of media scrutiny is a good thing. The downside is that secrecy inevitably breeds suspicion, the more so since our political class has given us little reason to trust it.
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
8 Jun 2013 11:39AM

Quote:since our politicians supposedly work for us they should be accountable to us, and if decisions which may affect each and every one of us are made at events such as this, we're within our rights to expect to be know about it.


Spot on. If a British cabinet minister attends an international conference, he/she is expected to report to Parliament about it. Other Western democracies have a similar rule.

Bilderberg seems to have been granted exemption, and that is what gives rise to suspicion and opposition. There is a feeling out there that broad strategy is being decided which will eventually feed into national policy. This may or may not be true but the secrecy does not help.

Also, it's a motley collection of individuals, including the ex-Queen of the Netherlands, General Petraeus, a columnist in a Turkish newspaper, an anchorwoman from an LA TV station, Henry Kissinger, Peter Mandelson etc. Actually the presence of the last two named probably does more to fuel suspicion than the rest put together!
spaceman 10 5.2k 3 Wales
8 Jun 2013 1:27PM
Our privacy is being eroded by the day but the elites want theirs preserved. What is it they like to say? " If you have nothing to hide........."
gcarth e2
10 2.3k 1 United Kingdom
9 Jun 2013 6:49PM

Quote:Actually the presence of the last two named probably does more to fuel suspicion than the rest put together!
Absolutely! We shouldn't want these guys anywhere near Britain - they're alien beings - a couple of cold fish - throw 'em back in the water...Tongue
gcarth e2
10 2.3k 1 United Kingdom
10 Jun 2013 1:25PM

Quote:Our privacy is being eroded by the day but the elites want theirs preserved. What is it they like to say? " If you have nothing to hide........."
They (the elite) have plenty to hide...
It's History repeating itself all over again: the controlling elite have the upper hand for years and years and keep pushing things until there's mayhem and bloodshed and then the elite will wonder why they have to barricade themselves against the masses. The truth is, we are already divided by the mental and cultural barricades that the ruling elite have created between themselves and the rest of us. They simply ignore reasonable arguments or protests - and through the media, they control the agenda of what we the ordinary public are allowed to question.

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