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    Cookie_Monster
    Cookie_Monster e2 Member 2Cookie_Monster vcard United States1 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Mar 2013 - 9:28 PM

    When taking photos does it make a difference if the shot is taken on a B&W setting or in colour and later changed to B&W?

    I was just wondering ......

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    24 Mar 2013 - 9:28 PM

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    bigalguitarpicker
    24 Mar 2013 - 10:15 PM

    Always shoot in colour. If you use a Mono setting, you're stuck with whatever the camera gives you. By shooting in colour (preferably in RAW) you capture all information in the scene and have full scope for editing afterwards, which will allow for much better tonality than what you'd get from a Mono capture. Smile
    Alex.

    Cookie_Monster
    Cookie_Monster e2 Member 2Cookie_Monster vcard United States1 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Mar 2013 - 10:24 PM

    I was thinking that too, but wasn't sure if there might be reason that a B&W is a better quality when shot in B&W. Smile

    mikehit
    mikehit  46171 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Mar 2013 - 10:28 PM

    If you shoot in B&W the settingonly applies to the jpeg - the sensor records the same colour information then the in-camera processing converts it to a B&W jpeg. The setting does not affect the raw data at all (in that respect, if you shoot raw you are always shooting in colour). If you shoot raw only, the LCD shows the jpeg image according to the settings you have selected even though the raw image is unaffected by it. If you shoot raw+jpeg you have a full-colour raw plus a B&W jpeg.

    The in camera processing is very good, but the question is whether the camera has done the conversion you want: some people prefer high-contrast B&W, some prefer full tonal B&W, some will change the balance according to the subject. So I would say shoot raw and convert it yourself.

    If, for example, you are shooting with Canon and use Canon's own software it will open the raw image with the in-camera settings and you can use that as a starting point for your processing. The same applies to nikon cameras and using Nikon's own software.

    If you shoot B&W jpeg only you are unlikely to get the full toanl range you want because a lot of the informatoin has been thrown away in the raw to jpeg conversion.

    Last Modified By mikehit at 24 Mar 2013 - 10:30 PM
    bwlchmawr
    bwlchmawr  2 England
    25 Mar 2013 - 7:06 AM

    I concur. When converting a full colour image to monochrome you have so many options to enhance different "colours" when they become shades of grey.

    I love monochrome images and if you live, as we do, in ill-favoured latitudes, weather-wise, black and white often looks better than dull, muddy colours.

    Of course, if money is no object, the Leica M-monochrome only shoots black and white...

    pentaxpete
    25 Mar 2013 - 11:13 AM

    If I want B&W I just use a B&W FILM and do it in my darkroom -- so easy !

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