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Bracketing & HDR

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    robway
    robway e2 Member 9317 forum postsrobway vcard Wales
    23 Dec 2010 - 4:41 PM

    Does is make very much difference if you use bracketed shots from the camera for producing HDR images or the alternative method changing the exposures of the original shot and creating the + and - exposures in something like Photoshop ?

    Thanks John

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    23 Dec 2010 - 4:41 PM

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    monstersnowman
    23 Dec 2010 - 5:21 PM

    well if you alter the exposure of a single shot on the pc (or mac) you are degrading the image quality the more you change the darkness or lightness. It is better to have several bracketted shots. The good point about a single shot is you dont get ANY movement or ghosting from moving objects. You can photograph people and it doesnt matter if the move if you only take one shot.

    robway
    robway e2 Member 9317 forum postsrobway vcard Wales
    23 Dec 2010 - 5:45 PM

    Thanks for that Paul, some good points. The other thought that comes to mind is that my Canon will take three bracketed shots but is is often suggested that 5 images be used.

    Cristian
    Cristian  9950 forum posts1 Constructive Critique Points
    23 Dec 2010 - 6:31 PM

    Hi, I usually take one RAW image and then process it 5 times, this avoids movement blur of the camera or objects (trees etc). Works for me, although I imagine the purest's will disagree with me.

    I personally wouldn't covert the image +1,+2 etc in PhotyoShop, but use the Canon DPP software to control the exposure. My thinking is that DPP will replicate the EV adjustment settings that you would set on your camera.

    I did compare a single RAW image processed 5 times against a combined 3 bracketed shot image and got exactly the same image when processed through Photmatix.

    I hope this is of some help to you, but I'd just suggest playing about and seeing what best suits your needs/style.


    Cristian

    DaveU
    DaveU e2 Member 81339 forum postsDaveU vcard England121 Constructive Critique Points
    23 Dec 2010 - 6:38 PM

    Useful info ....

    robway
    robway e2 Member 9317 forum postsrobway vcard Wales
    23 Dec 2010 - 7:07 PM

    A great help, thanks very much for your input everyone.

    Thanks John

    User_Removed
    23 Dec 2010 - 7:45 PM


    Quote: I did compare a single RAW image processed 5 times against a combined 3 bracketed shot image and got exactly the same image when processed through Photmatix.

    There 'HDR' and then ...

    HDR

    This will prove very informative.

    monstersnowman
    23 Dec 2010 - 10:48 PM


    Quote:
    I did compare a single RAW image processed 5 times against a combined 3 bracketed shot image and got exactly the same image when processed through Photmatix.



    Yes an image processed several times can produce a good enough result but it is situations where the variations in light intensity are large that the multi-processed single file will produce noise and in that case a tripod and bracketting would be a better way. Personally I use both methods depending on the scene and convenience.

    User_Removed
    24 Dec 2010 - 12:16 PM

    The point about the multiple processing of a single RAW file is that you are limiting your HDR range to the dynamic range captured by the camera sensor. In some cases that will be sufficient for your purposes.

    But, if you want your HDR image to exceed the dynamic range that your sensor can capture in a single exposure, then you have to use multiple exposures. When doing this be sure to shoot in Aperture Priority (or Manual) to ensure that each image has the same depth of field.

    Dave_Canon
    24 Dec 2010 - 12:56 PM

    As just posted, if you want to capture a scene of dynamic range greater than a single exposure (around 11 stops for good DSLR's) then you will have to have multiple exposure. This is not just an opinion but scientific fact. Many scenes e.g. inside a building with sun streaming through windows, night scenes with street lights etc. have dynamic ranges from 14 to 18 stops or more.

    While being able to set the AEB to more than three (as you can on some Nikon's) is very attractive, you are not limited to 3 exposures even with Canon's. One method I find useful is the set AEB with an interval of 2 stops (Raw files). Determine the centre exposure and set manual exposure. Then increase the speed by two stops and take a set of three then reduce the speed by two stops from centre and take another set of three exposures. You will have a set -4, -2, 0, 0, +2, +4 but you can delete one of the 0EV's which gives a set of five.

    Dave

    swanseamale47
    24 Dec 2010 - 9:11 PM

    Generally a single shot will work but wont give as good an image, they also tend to suffer more noise. Some of the HDR software will produce an image from a single raw/jpeg without having to resort to making the different versions in photoshop first.

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