Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Like 0

Brass rivets in pathway

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

julesm
julesm  101698 forum posts United Kingdom7 Constructive Critique Points
1 Aug 2013 - 10:53 PM

Does anyone know why brass rivet looking things have been installed in a line down the path outside our house?
What are they for, and why would they be installed so many years after the path was built?

I can provide a photo if needed.

jules

Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links 
1 Aug 2013 - 10:53 PM

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

779HOB
779HOB  21004 forum posts United Kingdom
1 Aug 2013 - 11:01 PM

Maybe to help the blind walk on the path. Not sure.

Jestertheclown
1 Aug 2013 - 11:12 PM


Quote: Maybe to help the blind walk on the path. Not sure.

If they stand proud of the path, then that would be my guess too.

Alternatively, they could have been placed to represent a town or local boundary. I know of one such down in Sussex.

Similarly, the footpath next to the London Eye is designated private property on one side of a row of studs, the other side being a public area. In that particular instance, it can affect where you're able to take photographs. Or not.

thewilliam
1 Aug 2013 - 11:26 PM

Sometimes a boundary isn't marked by a fence so they put brass studs in the paving, It's quite common.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314968 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
2 Aug 2013 - 1:38 AM

Its it in the actual path or along a raised edge.

MichaelMelb_AU

Why not to ask local council? Or a Twitter?

Hallie
Hallie  1166 forum posts United Kingdom
2 Aug 2013 - 5:21 AM


Quote: Does anyone know why brass rivet looking things have been installed in a line down the path outside our house?
What are they for, and why would they be installed so many years after the path was built?

I can provide a photo if needed.

jules

GCHQ influenced by the NSA?

youmightlikethis
youmightlikethis e2 Member 121003 forum postsyoumightlikethis vcard Scotland
2 Aug 2013 - 5:53 AM

tactile paving also called truncated domes used as a marker between pavement and road to assist blind people

wnbeat
wnbeat  834 forum posts Scotland
2 Aug 2013 - 7:24 AM

That's the reason , same as before pelican crossingsSmile

redsnappa
redsnappa  111900 forum posts United Kingdom
2 Aug 2013 - 8:17 AM

Art?

julesm
julesm  101698 forum posts United Kingdom7 Constructive Critique Points
2 Aug 2013 - 8:44 AM

Thanks for all the comments and suggestions Smile

They are raised, and go down the middle of a wide path.
I'll post a pic later today, and prob just ask the council and let you know

keithh
keithh  1022812 forum posts Wallis and Futuna29 Constructive Critique Points
2 Aug 2013 - 12:23 PM

When used down the middle of the pavement they designate the boundary between scum residents and OK people. It's just a posh way of showing the contractors where to erect the electric fence.

Wink

JackAllTog
JackAllTog e2 Member 53544 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
2 Aug 2013 - 1:02 PM

In some London pavements they are used to denote the boundary between the council owned path area and an office private area - useful to know if security guards are saying you can't take pictures on private land.

Jestertheclown


Quote: useful to know if security guards are saying you can't take pictures on private land.

As in the London Eye, above. I didn't realise that it was fairly common practice though.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314968 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
2 Aug 2013 - 8:28 PM


Quote: They are raised, and go down the middle of a wide path

Raised, as not level with the paving or raised and attached to the side of curb stones like boarders to flower beds etc.

I see both, the ones attached to curb stones look like shiny ball bearings evenly spaced, makes them more noticeable at night for the visually impaired.

Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 2 Aug 2013 - 8:29 PM

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.