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    melhar58
    melhar58  2
    18 Nov 2012 - 11:07 AM

    I am looking to purchase a bridge camera as my slr with lense are to heavey to carry around .Iam a bird watcher and would like to have indentfication off some off the birds i see at distance .Looking around i like the look off the panasonic lumix bridge but i am confused with many off the cameras models that do 24x zoom which is best.

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    MikeRC
    MikeRC e2 Member 93501 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
    18 Nov 2012 - 1:00 PM

    I'm in a similar quandry...don't want to spend half a K so considering the Fuiji HS30 at 243 from Amazon but thinking it may be a bit small...and think perhaps I should go for the X-S1,450 and only 26x but supposedly much better.
    ...I would certainly want a manual zoom....unfortunately no camera shop near here.
    ....Mike

    petebfrance
    18 Nov 2012 - 1:30 PM

    If you haven't already tried there, have a look at Birdforum.
    There is a section on equipment in the forums (fora?) with threads about some of the bridge cameras - often with photos that people have managed to produce with them.
    Birdforum
    Pete

    Last Modified By petebfrance at 18 Nov 2012 - 1:31 PM
    widtink
    widtink  2406 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
    18 Nov 2012 - 2:46 PM

    I have a lumix fz48 with 24 x zoom and its not enough for most bird photos IMO and its noisy at that end of the zoom , there is an olympus that has a massive zoom ??48 yhat may be better

    Rod

    petebfrance
    18 Nov 2012 - 3:42 PM

    I'm still hesitating - thinking of upgrading my Fuji S5600 which seems to do nicely for butterflies but really struggles (or is it me that struggles?) with birds.
    From looking at the threads on Birdforum, the photos that most impressed me are from the Canon's SX40 (840mm equiv) and SX50 (1200mm equiv) first, then the Panasonics FZ200 and FZ150 (600mm eqiv) but used with a teleconverter as 600mm equiv is not really that much (????)
    ???? is because although the 35mm equiv is pretty impressive, the image quality from such small sensors is perhaps rather questionable. For example, in one of the many reviews on the internet I saw a photo of a sparrow produced by a Kodak 990 (or whatever) - at 100% magnification it looked awful, but at 50% it looked really good. In theory I know that sensors are supposed to have improved since that particular Kodak, and Jpeg processing by these cameras has got cleverer (i.e. lots of in-camera sharpening which brings it' own issues) - nevertheless, I suspect that cropping may not be such a viable option as it is on cameras with larger (m43/APSC/FF etc.) sensors....
    My two-penneth, anyway.
    Pete

    Last Modified By petebfrance at 18 Nov 2012 - 3:53 PM
    Paul Morgan
    Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
    18 Nov 2012 - 4:29 PM

    Prosumers are just the same as anything else, you get what you pay for.

    For Birds this is about the best, its good for macro as well, and its weather sealed.
    http://www.wexphotographic.com/buy-fuji-x-s1-exr-black-digital-camera/p1528408

    It also has a great sensor and an impressive spec.

    http://www.wexphotographic.com/buy-fuji-x-s1-exr-black-digital-camera/p1528408#d...

    Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 18 Nov 2012 - 4:31 PM
    Paul Morgan
    Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
    18 Nov 2012 - 4:52 PM


    Quote: the image quality from such small sensors is perhaps rather questionable

    Its pretty good on the fuji

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cq2tUftH-pY&feature=relmfu
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q911pQTcyPA&feature=related

    Something I didn`t know, you can shoot in macro mode with the lens fully extended, up to a couple of metres away, with my x10 its restricted to the wide end of the lens.

    Last Modified By Paul Morgan at 18 Nov 2012 - 4:54 PM
    petebfrance
    18 Nov 2012 - 5:07 PM


    Quote: Something I didn`t know, you can shoot in macro mode with the lens fully extended, up to a couple of metres away, with my x10 its restricted to the wide end of the lens.


    My current (6 years old, now - I really should move on) one does something like that - gives a 380mm equiv which can be used between 90cms and 2 metres on the 'macro' setting. Its very useful for small butterflies, although at 90cms (well, 'really close', don't know if it's actually 90cm) it needs something with really good contrast to focus on (the legs are useful for that).
    Quite often camera reviews mention 'good macro' and then tell how close at the wide-end, but it's the long end that's important to me.

    Last Modified By petebfrance at 18 Nov 2012 - 5:08 PM
    Paul Morgan
    Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
    18 Nov 2012 - 7:06 PM


    Quote: Quite often camera reviews mention 'good macro' and then tell how close at the wide-end, but it's the long end that's important to me

    That`s because most only work close and wide, fine in some cases but not always, seeing one of those review opened my eyes. I already knew of its close focusing macro capabilities but not at the long end, that did come as a surprise.

    petebfrance
    18 Nov 2012 - 8:09 PM


    Quote: That`s because most only work close and wide, fine in some cases but not always, seeing one of those review opened my eyes. I already knew of its close focusing macro capabilities but not at the long end, that did come as a surprise.

    That's interesting - as you've probably gathered I'm no photographer (although I do like the toys).
    From my (distant memory) view point when using film SLRs the macro lenses I read about but never got round to buying tended to be 55mm and 90mm which would give a reasonable working distance, but not actually enough for me to get close to active butterflies without disturbing them. Somewhere or other I have a Carl Zeiss Jena 35mm Flektogon which is supposed to be good for macro work (though no diigital camera to mount it on) but I always assumed that it was too short a focal length.
    I was pleasantly surprised at what could be done with the bridge camera - and suspect that many of them will do the same. This year I've managed to get loads of pictures of butterflies, the sort that I used to see in books as a kid (a very long time ago, I'm afraid). When I started, other than the swallowtails which I'd photographed a few years ago, I didn't know one from another. Not sure what I'll do next summer as there aren't many left that turn up here to 'bag' but would really love to find a death's head hawkmoth.
    Technically, I guess it's nowhere near 'true macro' performance (1:1 at the sensor?) but it's really enjoyable.

    Last Modified By petebfrance at 18 Nov 2012 - 8:10 PM
    pablophotographer

    hi. if teh big bodies put you off, fuji's are like DSLRs (yes I liked teh manual zooming feature) why not considering Nikon P510 best bridge here http://www.ephotozine.com/article/ephotozine-best-cameras-of-the-year-awards-201...

    Paul Morgan
    Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
    9 Dec 2012 - 8:45 PM


    Quote: hi. if teh big bodies put you off, fuji's are like DSLRs

    Until you add a 600mm lens Smile

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