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Broadband speed- Mbps to mb


guidoa 13 1.4k United Kingdom
3 Jun 2008 9:39PM
I have run a couple of tests on the download speed of my up to 8mb connection which is provided by ADSL2 by Metronet (PlusNet) and the average this evening seems to be 0.47Mbps. Is this equivalent to less than 1mb or is 4.7mb? I am about 300mtrs from the exchange. Can someone xplain. Thanks

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Henchard 10 2.7k 1 United Kingdom
3 Jun 2008 9:45PM
0.47Mbs = 470Kbps i believe (I'm no expert)

Interestingly I'm with Metronet (and someway from the exchange) so just tested mine to compare and just got

Speed Down 701.85 Kbps ( 0.7 Mbps )
Speed Up 242.94 Kbps ( 0.2 Mbps )

Apparently a 2Mbs ADSl connection should have roughly 1840 Kbps download and 200-240 Kbps upload speed. I'm sure someone more 'geeky' can explain.
RogBrown 8 3.0k 10 England
3 Jun 2008 10:32PM
I'm on Tiscali Broadband & it's telling me that I'm now connected at 2Mbps. When I run the speed check, it tells me I'm getting 512kbps download & 188kbps upload. Why the difference?
Rog
newfocus 8 644 2 United Kingdom
3 Jun 2008 10:36PM
You'll generally find that the actually real-world speed of most broadband lines is way, way less than the maximum that they advertise. They should be more realistic with the marketing IMO and there's been a lot of fuss about it recently. It wouldn't be unheard of for you to be getting less than 1Mb out of an '8Mb' connection.
Big Bri 13 15.8k United Kingdom
3 Jun 2008 11:19PM
8Mbps == 1MBps

That is, 8 megabits per second == 1 megabyte per second

(since 1 byte = 8 bits)

Broadband speeds are always quoted in megabits per second, and it usually "up to", so my 8Mbps connection usually averages around 3-4Mbps.
When Windows shows you the data transfer rate, it's usually in MBps, so you should multiply by 8 to get the Mbps.
stevekhart 9 4.5k 3 United Kingdom
3 Jun 2008 11:33PM

Quote:since 1 byte = 8 bits

Not necessarily in comms, you often get 10 bits; 1 for parity and 1 for error checking. There seems to be a gradual "decimalisation" of units in computing.
Simon_P 8 487 4 United Kingdom
3 Jun 2008 11:46PM
ISP’s tell you “up to” xx speed, which covers all their bases for poor performance.

In real money 10Mbps is approx 1 MB ps so for a 8Mbps you would get aprox .8 MBps downstream, with all technologies working at optimum efficiency.

Cable is arguably the most consistent, most of the time.
VM 20Mbps service
Line Speed Down 18229 Kbps (18.2 Mbps )
Line Speed Up 731 Kbps ( 0.7 Mbps )

If a site is on a go slow, that all means very little.

This speed test is probably the most consistent test (London server for UK members)
RogBrown 8 3.0k 10 England
4 Jun 2008 12:16AM

Quote:This speed test is probably the most consistent test (London server for UK members)

OK, using that test, I'm getting 1.79 download speed which seems about right.
Rog
Big Bri 13 15.8k United Kingdom
4 Jun 2008 12:16AM

Quote:Not necessarily in comms, you often get 10 bits; 1 for parity and 1 for error checking. There seems to be a gradual "decimalisation" of units in computing.


What? In the old days there were parity bits, but that meant that each 8 bits of transmitted data only contained 7 bits of real info.

I've been in the computer industry for 20 years and I've never heard anyone suggest that 1 byte = 10 bits.
TomRiddle 7 50 United Kingdom
4 Jun 2008 12:31AM

Quote:I've been in the computer industry for 20 years and I've never heard anyone suggest that 1 byte = 10 bits.


Well you have now. SteveKHart is obviously "in the know". ROTFLMAO Grin
4 Jun 2008 1:00AM
Well I reckon Big Bri is right..bits & bytes have always revolved around 4 -8 -16 - 32 - 64 - 128 - 256 - 512 - (think of your memory card sizes..) ten don't come into it.... Wink "think I'll have a byte with 11 bits in it..oh.. I need another bit..okay,make that 12" .....doesn't happen..
TomRiddle 7 50 United Kingdom
4 Jun 2008 1:03AM

Quote:Well I reckon Big Bri is right.. ten don't come into it.


No sh1t. Of course he's right.
Carabosse Plus
12 39.7k 269 England
4 Jun 2008 2:44AM
I reckon Steve is "avin a larf" as they say! Wink

So far as the computer world is concerned the 8-bit byte has been around for a long time and shows no sign of being replaced.

Courtesy of Oscar Sodani, elsewhere on the web:


Quote:Since a bit can only be a zero or a one, it is not very useful if you wrote a letter to your friend and you want to save it to disk. There's only so much you can say by limiting your alphabet to two numbers. So computer engineers in the 1950s decided that they would group 8 bits together to represent each letter of the alphabet. There are 256 different combinations you can make with 8 zeros and ones, so it's more than enough to cover the alphabet and other special characters like the "?" and the "@". These 8 bits grouped together are called a byte.
Carabosse Plus
12 39.7k 269 England
4 Jun 2008 2:53AM
I should have just added that in the world of digital video you have 10-bit bytes.

Maybe this is what has confused Steve? Smile
stevekhart 9 4.5k 3 United Kingdom
4 Jun 2008 7:48AM
Nope, just the world of mobile data comms Smile

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