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Can I be asked to delete photos from my camera?

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waylandtb
waylandtb  325 forum posts United Kingdom
14 Jan 2013 - 4:06 PM

Just to clarify, this is a museum with a "open" photography policy ie you can photograph anything you like without restriction. This is not about pros trying to get pictures for publication in restricted areas.
There is a but ..... sometimes there are object or visiting exhibitions where photography isn't allowed and it isn't always made clear to the public. So people carry on taking pictures without knowing they are breaking any rules.

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User_Removed
14 Jan 2013 - 4:08 PM

At the risk of being slightly controversial (who, me??), can I suggest that anyone who takes photographs on private property (even private property to which the public have access), without first requesting permission, or at least ascertaining there is a general permission, is guilty of exactly the type of irresponsible behaviour that hardens attitudes against amateur photographers and makes like more difficult for the responsible majority?

I am not defending officious officials or goons who exceed their legal powers, but......

.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 14 Jan 2013 - 4:09 PM
Sooty_1
Sooty_1 Critique Team 41207 forum posts United Kingdom198 Constructive Critique Points
14 Jan 2013 - 4:20 PM

I agree to a certain extent, but the jobsworths have no right, even after the event, to seize property or make you delete photographs. Police don't have the right to arbitrarily 'steal' your images, so why should 'security personnel' be empowered by a sign they themselves put up?

They can do the same as the authorities...ie apply to the court for a court order, but they have to justify it, and that will take some time and effort. However, it would be legally binding on both parties'.

Nick

waylandtb
waylandtb  325 forum posts United Kingdom
14 Jan 2013 - 4:25 PM

Please see above, the location has an open photography policy, its not people taking photos on private property without obtaining permission first.

wsteffey
wsteffey  7 United States
14 Jan 2013 - 4:37 PM

For me, it would depend on the country I was in. Here in the U.S. I would resist up to the point of physical violence, then I would sue. If I were visiting Cuba, Saudi Arabia or even Mexico, I would delete them in a hurry, then rush to get our of Dodge, so to speak.

thewilliam
14 Jan 2013 - 6:06 PM

In most parts of the US, I'd comply with a demand to delete, especially if the security guard were armed. Too many mafia and madmen to think otherwise!

Last Modified By thewilliam at 14 Jan 2013 - 6:06 PM
66tricky
66tricky  7742 forum posts Scotland
14 Jan 2013 - 6:13 PM


Quote: Why not just delete the images, take the camera home and use "Recuva" to restore the images. SIMPLES SmileSmile

Because it reinforces their wrong belief that they are within the law to demand such an action?

KevSB
KevSB  101407 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
14 Jan 2013 - 6:18 PM


Quote: Please see above, the location has an open photography policy, its not people taking photos on private property without obtaining permission first.

Its still Private property even with an open policy. Museums are normally owned by the councal ect and are not public property. very few premises in this country are public property

User_Removed
14 Jan 2013 - 9:05 PM


Quote: what they were doing was illegal under data protection

The most misquoted bit of legislation ever, concerns how companies store and share information about you, nothing to do with protecting your files on your camera or many of the other situations where its name is mentioned.

thewilliam
14 Jan 2013 - 11:27 PM

The Data Protection Act and the Health & Safety at Work Act must be the two most useful pieces of legislation ever passed. I can generally use one or other to justify my refusal to do pretty well anything that is just too much bother!

KevSB
KevSB  101407 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
14 Jan 2013 - 11:35 PM


Quote: The Data Protection Act and the Health & Safety at Work Act must be the two most useful pieces of legislation ever passed. I can generally use one or other to justify my refusal to do pretty well anything that is just too much bother!

Ill match yours and add the human rights act, which give me the winning hand

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