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RWPhotoGraphix
RWPhotoGraphix e2 Member 5336 forum postsRWPhotoGraphix vcard United Kingdom
30 Aug 2010 - 8:17 PM

Hi all, i have been wondering what would be the best option for me to improve my career as a photographer, i currently have a nikon d50 but i am limited to what i can do because i have been told it does not support a flashgun, and the resolution is not as good as they are now-adays Tongue I am wanting to step up to a more pro camera but have a tight budget say around 500 until later this year, i prefer nikon as a model but would consider something similar at around the same price mark, but it must have a lens included as i dont think my nikon lens' would be compatible with other dslr's!
Thanks for taking time to read this and any advice would be greatly appriciated Tongue
p.s the reason i ask is because i have been aproached by a wedding company asking if i wouldnt mind going to see them about some work and i dont feel my d50 would be acceptable as the camera's now have greatly improved.

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RWPhotoGraphix
RWPhotoGraphix e2 Member 5336 forum postsRWPhotoGraphix vcard United Kingdom
30 Aug 2010 - 8:18 PM

or was i told it does not support a remote flash? awww i cant remember now lol

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2010 - 8:37 PM


Quote: Hi all, i have been wondering what would be the best option for me to improve my career as a photographer, i currently have a nikon d50 but i am limited to what i can do because i have been told it does not support a flashgun, and the resolution is not as good as they are now-adays Tongue I am wanting to step up to a more pro camera but have a tight budget say around 500 until later this year, i prefer nikon as a model but would consider something similar at around the same price mark, but it must have a lens included as i dont think my nikon lens' would be compatible with other dslr's!
Thanks for taking time to read this and any advice would be greatly appriciated Tongue
p.s the reason i ask is because i have been aproached by a wedding company asking if i wouldnt mind going to see them about some work and i dont feel my d50 would be acceptable as the camera's now have greatly improved.

lots of things in the above thread would make me think about my 'career' before going any further.

500 wont get you much.... not even the D90 body only, which would be my MINIMUM spec camera for weddings.

I would also look into camera gear in much greater detail, as to carry out a wedding you NEED to know your gear inside out... (like KNOWING what lenses to get and what they are compatible with.)

Have you done any wedding work before?? as it might be better to get some experience before commiting to a company that will expect a certain level from you, i would have thought.

just my 2c Smile

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RWPhotoGraphix
RWPhotoGraphix e2 Member 5336 forum postsRWPhotoGraphix vcard United Kingdom
30 Aug 2010 - 9:08 PM

hi thanks for your comment, i have done 2 weddings previously and both times the couples have been delighted, i know im only a begginer, and i know i could be shooting the gun a little, but the woman approached me and wants to have a talk about an oppertunity to work for her. I dont want to miss an oppertunity of a lifetime its not everyday someone asks you if you want to work for them Tongue
i do understand where your coming from tho and i wouldnt just go into it expecting to become pro overnight but im mainly interested in what would be an ideal step up from the nikon d50. Thankyou so much for your advice tho Smile

cameracat
cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2010 - 9:21 PM

Lets look at this another way....Smile

Apart from the D50, What other kit do you already have. ie: lens types, Speedlights etc etc.....?

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RWPhotoGraphix
RWPhotoGraphix e2 Member 5336 forum postsRWPhotoGraphix vcard United Kingdom
30 Aug 2010 - 9:29 PM

i have an 18-55mm lens and a 55-200mm lens, but have been offered money to buy more/new equipment from a family member, thats why im looking for advice what i need!
Thanks for your comment :@)

thewilliam
30 Aug 2010 - 10:32 PM

With the greatest of respect, it takes more than a nice camera to make a professional wedding photographer. When you start taking fees, a lot more is demanded of you and it's completely different from doing a favour for a friend.

In your position, I'd be thinking about training. Annabel williams and Damian Lovegrove will set you right.

pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2010 - 11:40 PM


Quote: With the greatest of respect, it takes more than a nice camera to make a professional wedding photographer. When you start taking fees, a lot more is demanded of you and it's completely different from doing a favour for a friend.

In your position, I'd be thinking about training. Annabel williams and Damian Lovegrove will set you right.

Interesting assumption thewilliam , that every good wedding photographer is trained ?, and thats just what it is , an assumption , some of us are self taught and go to the trouble of teaching ourselves and taking opportunities such as he is doing , yes its fair to say wedding photography is not easy , but its also fair to say that a lot of people make it out to be more difficult than it actually is for fear of competition , it is as much about personal skills as it is about photography and if you are the right type of person then there is no necessity to go to another photographer for training ! possibly even picking up another persons bad or good habits , everything is out there to teach you that you need you just have to take the time to learn it - and from there develop your own style.

RWPhotography , my advice to you would be to study the specs yourself and buy the best you can afford , nobody can tell you which camera is right thats your decision, and it may be that the company provides equipment ? , it is fair to say however to progress massively on your given budget you will be better off going for the second hand market ....

Andrew Davies
Wedding Photographer

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JamesBurns
30 Aug 2010 - 11:48 PM


Quote: Interesting assumption thewilliam , that every good wedding photographer is trained ?, and thats just what it is , an assumption , some of us are self taught and go to the trouble of teaching ourselves and taking opportunities such as he is doing...

The difference being, those who have been trained can appreciate the difference; Those who have not been trained can only look at the people who have and claim that it isn't necessary. Whilst I don't necessarily agree with William's choice of training providers, it's difficult to find fault with the general gist of his advice, regardless of position... If you've not experienced both sides of the coin, how can you say which is better?

James Burns
Rank Amateur who occasionally knows better...

Last Modified By JamesBurns at 30 Aug 2010 - 11:49 PM
pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
31 Aug 2010 - 12:08 AM

Photography is an Art , and as with any other art i would accept that training ( as in how to use a brush , paint , or a a camera ) is a good thing. It is not however then a necessity to be trained in how to produce the art , that is something that either comes natural or doesnt , and I have met enough degree qualified photographers to realise that qualifications mean zip all . . the real art of photographer is in the eye of the photographer , in the magic of the moment , and in the heart and soul of the person creating that artwork - that is what stands the real class out from the crowd.

JamesBurns
31 Aug 2010 - 12:16 AM

OK then Andrew,

As a none-pointed question, where do you place yourself within the art of the photographer that you have just described? As an artist, we need to be able to be both arrogant, at times, along with exhibiting humility. In the greater scheme of things, how would you describe your own work in relation to:


Quote: the magic of the moment , and in the heart and soul of the person creating that artwork

I've just spent a good 20 minutes browsing your website and I'm curious to know where you would grade yourself in the ranks of the untrained?

keith selmes
31 Aug 2010 - 1:09 AM


Quote: what would be the best option for me to improve my career as a photographer
any advice would be greatly appriciated

RTFM - Read The Friendly Manual, and find out what your camera can or can't do Smile

Failing that, you could try dpreview

and there's also a D50 review at the Ken Rockwell site here

They both confirm that there is no PC socket on the D50, so there is a problem connecting external flash.
There is also a problem in not being able to cost effectively connect intelligent flash units that can work with the camera.

Rockwell has some detail on the flash:
"No ability to use the built-in flash for remote control of external flash. To do this you'd need to buy an SU-800 or SB-800 for a few hundred dollars, which makes no sense. If you use this feature (I do) just get a D70 or D70s. I have a whole page explaining this"

WARNING: Rockwell is a comedian. This particular article looks pretty useful, but a lot of his stuff should not to be taken seriously.

Dpreview is a good resource for checking camera specs, if you need to hunt for a more capable body.

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Overread
Overread  63746 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
31 Aug 2010 - 2:01 AM

My view is that you don't get experience in any field of craft without hands on experience in the field - be it shooting a wedding or welding a car. However few people jump right in to take paying clients when they are still in the training stages of their craft.

My advice to you is thus, that whilst you have had experience in shooting two weddings and clearly your work that you've presented has impressed more than just your clients; you are still quite "green" as it were in the whole field. There are many pitfalls possible and the last thing you need as you try to start yourself up is to end up in court being sued for being unable to deliver on the day.
Generally the advice would be to find a local wedding photographer and ask to ghost them or even to second shoot for them - allowing you at the very least to shoot a wedding without your shots being important - giving you time to experiment without risking the couples day. Furthermore most setups like this will also let you make some money from sales if your shots are up to the photographers standard. The best is not just ghost them but become a student of theirs to learn the trade - sure you might pick up bad tips/habbits; but you've also got the great chance to pick up good advice and further the fact that you are engaging with the photographic community (ie us!) means that you've always get another host of opinions to choose from as well.

I'm not sure what the person who is offering you a job is offering you exactly - but I would be open to the offer, but also cautious if they appear to be offering you a little too much to a self admitted beginner (ie letting you shoot full weddings without support/meeting any set standards etc..).

pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
31 Aug 2010 - 9:25 AM


Quote: OK then Andrew,

As a none-pointed question, where do you place yourself within the art of the photographer that you have just described? As an artist, we need to be able to be both arrogant, at times, along with exhibiting humility. In the greater scheme of things, how would you describe your own work in relation to:

the magic of the moment , and in the heart and soul of the person creating that artwork

I've just spent a good 20 minutes browsing your website and I'm curious to know where you would grade yourself in the ranks of the untrained?

Hi James ,

Not really sure i understand your question , i agree with the arrogance and humility part though , personally i am completely self trained and started with a 35mm about 15years ago , then about 5 years ago was asked to do a friends wedding , then another and so on and so forth , I got the wedding bug from day one and loved it and have concentrated on learning ever since , from site such as this one and others , magazines and more than anything practise at every type of photography i can from urbex to portrait , I am a professional photographer as this is my trade my living and my love , but never stop learning. I appreciate the time you have taken on my site too and would love to hear any good or bad comments you may have ?

Overread - couldnt agree more , tagging along with a local makes a lot more sense than paying someone to train you ...

Andy

roxpix
roxpix  102236 forum posts Scotland11 Constructive Critique Points
31 Aug 2010 - 10:06 AM

RW it may be prudent to wait until you meet with the company before deciding what your budget is
i.e. if they made a wage available that meant you could spend 2,000 interest free and pay it off in a reasonable time, it would change your options dramatically!

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