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Canned Air

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    ray1
    ray1  10518 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Jun 2005 - 5:58 AM

    Does anyone have any reccommendations for canned air to be used with a sensor brush. The local jessops couldnt help (didnt know what a sensor brush was). I was also thinking about one of those pump up sprayers from the garden centre.

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    25 Jun 2005 - 5:58 AM

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    paul_indigo
    25 Jun 2005 - 6:08 AM

    I'm amazed by how little knowledge there is about cleaning sensors in the photography stores. Either that or they've been instructed to be cagey because of all the manafucturers dire warnings about touching the high-pass filter. I believe any canned air will work with the sensor brush because it is the friction of the brush hairs against each other, as they are blown, that loads the static charge. However you want to take care not to get propellant on the hairs. So CO2 is probably safest but anything will do with proper care. Even a foot pump vigorously used will generate enough charge.

    I have sensor sweep from Copperhill. Much cheaper! This brush is charged by rubbing it on vellum paper. But each sensor brush is different.

    paul indigo
    indigo2 photography

    ray1
    ray1  10518 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Jun 2005 - 6:14 AM

    Thanks Paul and my thoughts about the staff knowledge, especially as they give this as one of the reasons for the higher high street prices. They have two products on sale their own brand that says it contains LPG and Kenro that says its CFC free but also says it is flamable so that raised a question as to what else is in the can.

    baker58
    baker58  11101 forum posts United Kingdom
    25 Jun 2005 - 6:19 AM

    Not speaking from experience here, but I have read that placing the brush in front of a vacuum cleaner nozzle has much the same effect at charging the sensor by sucking air through the bristles.

    paul_indigo
    25 Jun 2005 - 6:40 AM

    Anything that gets the bristles to rub together produces static electricity, so the vacuum cleaner idea makes sense if it's vigorous enough. I'd be a bit wary around anything dusty though. When you do clean your sensor do it in a room that is as dust free and still as possible.

    Just Jas
    Just Jas  1225752 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Jun 2005 - 6:56 AM

    Walking across your man-made fibre carpet can produce high levels of static. Just touch an earthed object to find out, afterwards.

    The seat of a proposed new chair for our factory production operators was found to have a charge of 33KV on its seat when measured with a suitable instrument.

    jas

    User_Removed
    25 Jun 2005 - 7:17 AM

    I've said this before on other related posts; static is a killer for electronics. Keep it away from you camera.

    You could a lot worse that get yourself an anti-static wrist strap as used in the computer maintenance industry, slip it on your wrist and put the croc-clip to the cold water system of the building. The kitchen stop-**** is a good place - just extend the wire.

    Mike

    ray1
    ray1  10518 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Jun 2005 - 8:00 AM

    Thanks guys, I cant get the brush to remove any dust and it probably puts more on so I think it is going to have to be digi pads.

    User_Removed
    25 Jun 2005 - 8:38 AM

    Could try these. They get my recommendation...

    ray1
    ray1  10518 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Jun 2005 - 8:53 AM

    Thought about those but have read poor reports. I suppose the problem is trying all these things starts to get expensive. I think they would probably get more sales if they gave samples out for people to try.

    elowes
    elowes  102832 forum posts United Kingdom
    25 Jun 2005 - 10:28 AM

    Creating static in a small brush is not likely to cause problems in an inert electronic device but care should always be taken when using static electicity to ensure any residules are discharged. Be aware that even in a small item high levels of energy can be genrated.

    I would not used compressed air on my camera for any reason. They can cause instant condensation because the air can be at sub zero teperatures near to the nozzel and can blow dust at sensitive parts at high velocity rather than blowing dust away.

    Hoovers are likely to introduce large amounts of dust into the room a,d settle on the camera.

    If you must use static brushes (not troed them) I agree with those that can be charged by rubbing lightly on something.

    User_Removed
    25 Jun 2005 - 11:01 AM


    Quote: Thought about those but have read poor reports. I suppose the problem is trying all these things starts to get expensive. I think they would probably get more sales if they gave samples out for people to try.

    There are also good reports.

    Ask 'em. 'Don't ask - don't get' is the maxim here. You have real fears about this whole thing - ask them to post out a couple... who knows?

    ray1
    ray1  10518 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Jun 2005 - 12:32 PM

    Looks like they do a money back guarentee.

    paul_indigo
    25 Jun 2005 - 12:43 PM

    Whoops. Edit mistake.

    sillyconguru
    25 Jun 2005 - 12:46 PM

    Paul, wrong thread.

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