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Canon 40d how big?

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    Keith-Mckevitt
    20 Dec 2010 - 8:39 PM

    Hi everyone, I have been asked to provide some images at work but they need to be A1 size. This seems a little big to me but what I need to know is if the Canon eos 40d will produce good quality image at this size?
    Many thanks
    Keith

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    20 Dec 2010 - 8:39 PM

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    MrGoatsmilk
    20 Dec 2010 - 9:06 PM

    How close will people be when they view them, also what are the images?

    Keith-Mckevitt
    20 Dec 2010 - 9:16 PM

    The images are to be donated to and displayed in a hospital stroke unit but if suitable would also be displayed in the main hospital. They require images of local landscapes, architecture and flowers.
    Keith

    MrGoatsmilk
    20 Dec 2010 - 9:40 PM

    I've just been having a look around the forum as I know it has been asked and covered before. Hence the reason I asked how far away people will view them from, further away the more you can get away with.


    Found these...

    here

    and here

    a few more here


    HTH

    Stu

    Keith-Mckevitt
    20 Dec 2010 - 9:41 PM

    That's great!
    Thanks for your help.

    Regards
    Keith

    JackAllTog
    JackAllTog e2 Member 53635 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
    21 Dec 2010 - 1:43 PM

    Its the detail that become an issue, as you have an image about 3888 x 2592 pixels, so as you stretch this accross an a1 sheet ( Size 84 x 60 cm), so each pixel starts to become distinct when viewed close enough.

    Solutions to this can be simple structures where bold angle and lines make the interest in the picture rather than the fine detail which will look blurry and pixelated. In this way the image is naturally viewed from a distance.

    Alternatively stitching together panoramics will give you more pixels to play with, a variation on this theme is more of a scrapbook approach with different views of related subjects all added to one image.

    brian1208
    brian1208 e2 Member 1110294 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
    21 Dec 2010 - 1:52 PM

    if you start with a well exposed and sharp image then you can easily print at up to 30"x20" with 40D files (I have images from my old 350D which print to this size for sale)

    For the use you are talking about printing at 180 ppi

    johnp
    johnp  10139 forum posts United Kingdom
    4 Jan 2011 - 1:31 PM

    It really shouldn't be a problem, Keith. I've produced a number of display prints that sort of size, using Photoshop's Image Size to blow them up (using interpolation). Some were portraits with buildings in the background. All were shot on a 40D with the Canon 24-105mm f/4 L series lens. In fact it's your lens quality that could be the limiting factor.

    I was taught that exhibition quality prints should be made at 300ppi. Last year I was running a Photoshop course for my local camera club and decided to make prints at 300ppi, 240ppi, 200ppi, 150ppi and 72ppi to illustrate that point. I chose a portrait in semi profile and picked a portion that included an eye, a cheek and a patch of brown hair with dark shadows in it. To be blunt, I reckon most of my portrait clients would have accepted the 72ppi print without complaint. If you looked closely at the prints (maybe 6-8 inches away) the eye did show faint stepping around the pupil because of the size of the pixels, but held a foot or so away the prints were indistinguishable. Suffice to say that when I took the prints in for the next lesson I took a loupe as well.

    If you are still concerned, make a file the right size (aim for about 150ppi to 200ppi and use Image Size) then select a few 6"x8" patches and get them printed. Your test patches should come both from the centre and from edges in case your lens shows excessive edge fall-off. I didn't bother doing that, because I have confidence in the lens.

    My prints were made by Loxley and drew many favourable comments.

    John

    Keith-Mckevitt
    4 Jan 2011 - 1:37 PM

    Many thanks for your reply John, you have been very re-assuring and I am grateful for your contribution.
    regards
    Keith

    johnp
    johnp  10139 forum posts United Kingdom
    4 Jan 2011 - 1:40 PM

    My pleasure, Keith. Let us know how you get on!
    PS Don't forget to view the test prints from a fair distance away to get an accurate idea of what normal viewers will see.
    John

    Last Modified By johnp at 4 Jan 2011 - 1:42 PM
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