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Canon 650d

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Reason : not helpful


j012 2 4 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2012 7:57PM
I was planning to open a small photography company and i have a canon 650d will this be good enough camera to use.

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2 Oct 2012 9:01PM
Are you serious?
j012 2 4 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2012 9:14PM
yeah y
justin c 11 4.6k 36 England
2 Oct 2012 9:15PM

Quote:I was planning to open a small photography company and i have a canon 650d will this be good enough camera to use.


Yeah, no problem. Get yourself a cheapy kit lens to go with it and who knows.............................the sky's your limit.
j012 2 4 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2012 9:18PM
thanks.

what would be a good lens for portraits and wedding piks
justin c 11 4.6k 36 England
2 Oct 2012 9:25PM
Any old thing would do really. The cheap, crappy lenses can be picked up for peanuts from boot sales. They obviously won't produce particularly good results but you can just tell your customers that the poor quality is an intentional soft focus type effect and it's all the rage at the moment, they'll be none the wiser and you'll be quids in. I would probably try and get something around 150mm in focal length, or even bigger. The wide angle lenses are all well and good for weddings and portraits, but it means getting much closer to your subjects, I find this can be a bit unpleasant as a lot of them are likely to have bad breath and a bit of B.O. after a long, drawn out day at the church or studio. Much better to go for the longer focal lengths, allowing you to keep your distance from the smelly ones. Hope this advice helps and good luck with your new venture.
2 Oct 2012 9:27PM
I think you need to spend several years learning your trade, before launching yourself upon an unsuspecting public.

You don't become an automotive engineer by asking what size spanners you need to buy from Halfords.
2 Oct 2012 9:39PM
This is obviously a wind up, right? If not you'd better get yourself some good insurance & I don't mean to cover damage to your camera.
2 Oct 2012 9:52PM
Stu. I don't think that his camera will suffer any damage in the area it might become lodged.
j012 2 4 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2012 10:10PM
ourdayphotos i dont know wht u mean plz explane
2 Oct 2012 10:14PM
Being a professional photographer is very easy, the camera does all the work & you don't need to know a thing. It's a bit like being a pilot, you just need the captain's hat & the plane will do the rest!
j012 2 4 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2012 10:25PM
i was just askin for advise you dont have to get all sarcastic a simple answer will do
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
2 Oct 2012 10:32PM
The 650D is an excellent camera and the output will be plenty enough for most professional jobs. Whether you have the skills to give the customer what they need every time is a different matter.
2 Oct 2012 10:44PM
You come on here saying you want to start a photography company & you've got to ask what lens to use for weddings & portraits?? Have you ever photographed a wedding or taken someone's portrait. Do you know the difference between crop & full frame cameras & what thery're both capable of & what's the best camera for the job, do you know anything about lighting, studio flash, strobe, daylight, reflectors, etc etc. I can't resist the temptation of sounding sarcastic because your question sounds ridiculous frankly. If you are serious about this then set your sights much lower, take lots of photos for many years or/and take a decent course, then see how you feel about your abilities.
jazzygf e2
11 537 Scotland
3 Oct 2012 12:32AM
Okay just read this and had to check the date nope not april the 1st. Ok J012 here goes the 650d is an ok beginners camera to get into digital photography, it gives good work rate and will not let you down, the only thing that may let you do is the squishy thing behind the back of the viewfinder. What ourdayphotos might have been trying to point out is you have asked a question that leaves you open to ridicule and satire.
Lets look at it in a more direct approach:
1. what experience do you have?
2. what lighting set up will you use?
3. what pricing have you got in mind for weddings, portraits etc?
4. do you have a portfolio?
5. do you have a shop/studio?
6. do you have insurance both for damaged to your equipment and public liability?
7. do you have back up equipment if your main equipment fails when at a wedding or outdoor event?
once you have answered all those questions then maybe you can ask about an entry level camera to start a business.
Personally 3 years at college and an HND in photography and digital imaging later, I know I would struggle running my own business and I know the cameras to use and the equipment etc to get me from one job to the next. But If you can make it with a 650d and a lot of luck go for it. Once you make it big come back and rub our faces in it until then I for one would say look at youtube for photographers videos on equipment etc before you dive in feet first on a job you may not be suitable to do.