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Canon Macro Lens Advice Needed

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urdygurdy
urdygurdy  5136 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
24 Sep 2008 - 5:51 PM

as i am kinda new to macro and non zoom lens's i could do with some advice please from people in the know......!!

I really want to try my hand at macro photography after being inspired by members photos in the gallery here on ephotozine

With regards to the following 2 lens
Canon EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro USM
Canon EF 50mm F2.5 Macro

the minimum focusing distance on both is around 20cm so apart from that & the usm motor and slight Aperture difference and around 60 price difference

What else is the difference between the 2 lens??

I am presuming that at 20cm away from subject the 60mm lens will show you more detail than the 50mm..........!!

Any help or advice would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks in advance

a confused Darren

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24 Sep 2008 - 5:51 PM

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Leif
Leif  9722 forum posts
24 Sep 2008 - 6:29 PM

The 60mm is APS only, so will not work on cameras with larger sensors such as the 5D. Otherwise doesn't the 50mm only go to 1:2?

The lens will be dictated by the intended use. For copying documents, flowers, fungi and indoor studio work, ~50mm is fine. But for insects you really need at least 100mm so that you can stay further away, and have room for macro flash lighting. 200mm is even better for insects, but you pay in terms of weight, size and price.

I suspect you would be better off with the Canon 100mm lens. Maybe Kerso can do one cheapish?

tomcat
tomcat e2 Member 85870 forum poststomcat vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
24 Sep 2008 - 6:56 PM

Depends on what sort of macro photography you are considering ?

If it is insects etc then you won't go far wrong with a Sigma 150mm or 180mm(though the latter is a tad on the heavy side)

Adrian

cambirder
cambirder  107202 forum posts England
24 Sep 2008 - 7:03 PM


Quote: Otherwise doesn't the 50mm only go to 1:2?

Yes, so at each lenses minimum focal distance the 60mm give twice the magnification.


Quote: I suspect you would be better off with the Canon 100mm lens.

Or a Tamron 90mm, Sigma 105mm or 150mm.

Hunting flighty insects I use the Sigma 150mm + 1.4x converter and manual focus. For more cooperative creatures like spiders I tend to use my Canon 100mm

Overread
Overread  63746 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
24 Sep 2008 - 7:23 PM

Yep the 50mm is only a 1:2 macro - although there is an upgrade part you can get to make it 1:1 (true) macro, but I don't think its worth it really.
Better to go for the very sharp and good EFS 60mm or the canon 100mm macro or look to the sigma line of macro primes (70, 105, 150, 180mm). I consider the 50mm sigma macro to be a bit on the cheap side, whilst only the 180mm macro *as said earlier* is too heavy for prolonged handheld use - the rest all work very well handheld.

Like Cambirder I would recomned the 150mm macro from sigma for a good insect lens - its working distance is the longest you can get without a tripod and its light enough to handhold - it also work well with sigmas line of teleconverters (1.4 and 2* - though the latter is a more difficult tool to use*

glsammy
glsammy  7194 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
24 Sep 2008 - 8:07 PM

I also would recommend the Sigma 150mm. Works extremely well with the Kenko pro 300 1.4X TC, this is my usual macro walk about set up, giving better than 1:1 at the minimum focus distance of around 15".
I rate the 150mm as my favourite lens by far. For small wildlife such as damselflies etc, it's just about perfect.

HSTONEY222
24 Sep 2008 - 11:08 PM

hello darren,
the canon 60mm macro lens is 1to1 life size and
the working distance from the front end of the
lens is about 9cm.
darren please take a look at my berrie &spider on my portfolio
as they were both taken on 60mm lens2.8 canon len(macro)
yours howard .hope this is of help.
please send reply via my p.m.box many thanks.

Last Modified By HSTONEY222 at 24 Sep 2008 - 11:11 PM
martyn05
martyn05  7363 forum posts England
25 Sep 2008 - 12:46 PM

My wife uses the Sigma 105mm for Macro and she is very happy with it.

urdygurdy
urdygurdy  5136 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
25 Sep 2008 - 3:03 PM


Quote: Hello darren,
the canon 60mm macro lens is 1to1 life size and
the working distance from the front end of the
lens is about 9cm.
darren please take a look at my berrie &spider on my portfolio
as they were both taken on 60mm lens2.8 canon len(macro)
yours howard .hope this is of help.
please send reply via my p.m.box many thanks.

Yes i am new to macro and i aint being funny but them macro shots i have just looked at don't make me want to rush out and order the 60mm macro, neither are very sharp on in focus..........

Darren

HSTONEY222
25 Sep 2008 - 3:10 PM

sorry! darren, but they were hand held and not on tripod
howard.it was the 2 which i said was taken on the 60mm macro lens.

Last Modified By HSTONEY222 at 25 Sep 2008 - 3:13 PM
Leif
Leif  9722 forum posts
25 Sep 2008 - 3:18 PM


Quote:
"I suspect you would be better off with the Canon 100mm lens."
Or a Tamron 90mm, Sigma 105mm or 150mm.


Having owned the Tamron 90mm, I sold it and bought the Nikon AFD 105mm, a much better lens IMO. I suspect the Canon will be better, but not having used it, I cannot say. As for Sigma, I read recently that a lens hire firm no longer stock most Sigma lenses as the failure rate was very high ~30% per year rather than ~5-10% per year for Nikon/Canon. A friend's Sigma 180mm looks well made though.

HSTONEY222
25 Sep 2008 - 3:29 PM

hello leif,
sorry dont have your name, but if i had any money now
may be i could have the choice of buying longer lenes and a new camera both i'm with out at this time also out of work at this time
and geting angry that i had to sell my kit ,and still waiting for my
return on it.
sorry for being uptight, not geting at any one on here for any comments.
howard.

Overread
Overread  63746 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
25 Sep 2008 - 3:52 PM

I have heard that sigma do have some product problems - however I think these are more on their cheap budget lenses and also on ones such as the bigma - 50-500mm and even Canon when they made their 100-400mm had production line problems with super zooms.
Also if you want so see some very good examples of the Canon 60mm macro take a look a Bombebit's work
link
And note that to get a full butterfly one usually has to work out of the 1:1 area - often up as far as 1:2 macro to get the wings in - so there is still more power in that lens. Remember that photography is only partly kit - the other part is the ape holding the kit Wink

STO139 -- check your spider photo comments Smile

HSTONEY222
25 Sep 2008 - 3:59 PM


Quote: I have heard that sigma do have some product problems - however I think these are more on their cheap budget lenses and also on ones such as the bigma - 50-500mm and even Canon when they made their 100-400mm had production line problems with super zooms.
Also if you want so see some very good examples of the Canon 60mm macro take a look a Bombebit's work
link
And note that to get a full butterfly one usually has to work out of the 1:1 area - often up as far as 1:2 macro to get the wings in - so there is still more power in that lens. Remember that photography is only partly kit - the other part is the ape holding the kit

STO139 -- check your spider photo comments

brownargus
25 Sep 2008 - 4:12 PM

I use either the Sigma 105 plus a Kenko 1.5x converter which work very well or a Sigma 180 macro which gives a little further distance from the subject, although it is quite heavy. I have found that with the 105 (=160 on an APS sensor) on its own the working distance is too close for most active insects. With the 1.5x converter it is better since it doesn't scare the insects so much. The 180 (=270 on an APs sensor) is better still with excellent image and better bokeh. With most macro work, it is advisable to use a tripod or at least a monopod. Unfortunately the excellent Sigma 150 isn't available in Pentax fit. With a full size sensor, I would recommend at least the 150 with a 1.5x converter or the 180, also with a 1.5x convertor. Many of my colleagues who have Canon 5Ds use a the latter combination. The most important thing with macro insect work is patience!!

John

Last Modified By brownargus at 25 Sep 2008 - 4:13 PM

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