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Carrying Heavy Equipment

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mikehit
mikehit e2 Member 45765 forum postsmikehit vcard United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
28 Aug 2013 - 3:38 PM

Unless carrying studio gear (lamps, power packs etc) into the field I am struggling to think what would weigh 60kgs. Ego perhaps....? (one massive winkie needed there...). A full pub lunch with gallon of beer?

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28 Aug 2013 - 3:38 PM

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keith selmes
28 Aug 2013 - 7:06 PM

I've had the impression that soldiers usually carry about 60 pounds, from the Roman era right through to the late 20th century, although loads can sometimes go over 100 pounds. Currently I believe British soldiers are actually loaded down with much heavier weights, and 132 pounds is not impossible in Afghanistan, a problem which MOD are supposed to be working on. The body armour weighs 40 pounds or more, with the usual gear on top of that.

What really struck me, considering comments from participants in this thread, is that soldiers are usually male, under 50, and certified medically fit. Clearly not many in this discussion are in that category, so telling people to build up their strength is not very sensible or tactful.

One problem the army have just now is the number of injuries caused by carrying too much weight - and riddell may be learning about that if he isn't very careful. I have some intermittent problems now that were caused by too much heavy lift and carry when I was much younger. I don't really have regrets but there are days I could wish my younger self had been a little bit more sensible.

keithh
keithh  1022557 forum posts Wallis and Futuna29 Constructive Critique Points
28 Aug 2013 - 11:01 PM

Everybody knows that proffeshunul gear weighs lots and lots of kilowatts and we carry loads of it aided by our photografers assistants. My main camera weighs about two stones without the film in it.

779HOB
779HOB  2985 forum posts United Kingdom
29 Aug 2013 - 12:10 AM

Most, no all, the pros I know carry two cameras and a small bag with spare cards and batteries in. That's it.

lemmy
lemmy  61672 forum posts United Kingdom
29 Aug 2013 - 9:40 AM


Quote: Most, no all, the pros I know carry two cameras and a small bag with spare cards and batteries in. That's it.

Depends what you are doing. When I was a pro, if I was covering a riot or plane crash, say, I'd carry 2 camera bodies and 3 lenses plus films. Didn't weigh much. On the other hand, if I was doing an at home shoot with a celeleb I'd have 2 cases of Elinchroms, 1 case with 2 Hasselblad bodies, one electric, one manual, 4 lenses and 6 backs. That weighs a lot, so an assistant on that one.

It's hard to say what a pro would use - it really does depend on your field of work. Are you in the UK or Africa? In London or the Scottish highlands? Traveling by boat or by air? If I was working for McCartney Productions who paid absolute top dollar, I'd take everything I had, just in case. Heavy! If it was for The Mail who payed a standard fee, I'd just take what I needed.

Horses for courses.

thewilliam
29 Aug 2013 - 10:21 AM


Quote: I've had the impression that soldiers usually carry about 60 pounds, from the Roman era right through to the late 20th century, although loads can sometimes go over 100 pounds. Currently I believe British soldiers are actually loaded down with much heavier weights, and 132 pounds is not impossible in Afghanistan, a problem which MOD are supposed to be working on. The body armour weighs 40 pounds or more, with the usual gear on top of that.


An SA80 plus 200 rounds weighs less than half as much as the old L1A1 with 200 rounds, so do today's soldiers have it soft?

The army photographers have to carry their camera gear, plus laptop and maybe a satellite dish in addition to the regular kit.

Last Modified By thewilliam at 29 Aug 2013 - 10:21 AM
keith selmes
29 Aug 2013 - 12:59 PM

anyway, back on topic, here's how you carry heavy equipment

http://www.beatenbergbilder.ch/home/reportage_30_train_beatenberg.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7gqMm-VrPA

suejoh
suejoh e2 Member 9232 forum postssuejoh vcard United Kingdom
30 Aug 2013 - 7:02 PM

Hi everyone - some great ideas. Best is to use OH - not young and strapping but I cant be choosy now Smile.
However for those times when he is unwilling (hard to believe I know) or just not around I will pick up on some of the suggestions.

We are off to Scotland tomorrow so I will try and be inventive with what is to hand and follow up ideas when I get back.
Thanks to you all.
Sue

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 109965 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2013 - 10:00 PM

Spent the day up on Boscombe Cliff shooting the Air Festival, using Ade's suggestion of a Fishing Trolley (my old one from the garage). It worked a treat, two heavy folding chairs + my back-pack (where most of the weight was bottles of water + a thermos of soup)

Worked a treat, thanks for the reminder Ade

Hope you get sorted and have a great trip Sue

Ade_Osman
Ade_Osman e2 Member 114435 forum postsAde_Osman vcard England36 Constructive Critique Points
30 Aug 2013 - 10:16 PM


Quote: Worked a treat, thanks for the reminder Ade

As I've said before Bri, you may get some strange looks and comments, but you end up having the last laugh as you see everyone walking home looking like a cripple because they've been carrying a rucksack around on their shoulders all day. It also proves it's handy for all the other gear you normally make the wife carry around too, so you keep her happy as well, unless like me you get her dragging the trolley around all day Tongue

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