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Changing history??


macroman 11 15.3k England
19 Jan 2012 10:18AM
What do you think?

All very clever, but should we change everything just becaiuse we can?
I have mixed opinions about this technique.
I can see that it would be nice for family portraits and such like, the ones of Winston Churchill and Albert Einstein are particularly good, but messing with famous iconic images seems to me to be going a tad too far.
B&W images are a reflection of the technology of the period and to change them to colour doesn't seem right somehow.
Would you colour/sharpen/enhance those old sepia family photos? Somehow I think that they would lose something in the porocess.
Of course B&W prints were often hand coloured, but that was a product of the period, not quite the same as modern rehashing of old images.

Presumably Ms Dullaway will now make a mint from other peoples images?

Now where did I file those scans of my B&W negs.............Grin

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collywobles 10 3.4k 9 United Kingdom
19 Jan 2012 10:33AM
I dont disagree with your comments 'macroman' but -------WOW! Incredible work here and from my personal pov I think it adds a lot to the images. Very talented.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
19 Jan 2012 10:33AM
Some of them are quite effective.

Not sure they are all out of copyright yet (70 years after death of photographer? - or has that changed?) so what is the legality?

Don't think the Wolseley 1500 was ever produced in that shade of blue.
whipspeed e2
10 4.1k 22 United Kingdom
19 Jan 2012 10:40AM
Yep, clever bit of PS work, but does it make them better? For me no. B&W was the only available film then and they have a charm of their own. The Dorothea Lange shot to me is far more striking in the original rather than the coloured image.
I would also wonder about her making money from other peoples original work.
Pete e2
13 18.7k 96 England
19 Jan 2012 10:42AM
Thanks for the link that's incredible Photoshop work

Some of the shots look timeless and the colour actually improves them, but ones like the sailor kissing should remain black & white for the period. I tend to sepia tone shots I take now that are taken in period costume, simply because it feels right.
digicammad 11 22.0k 37 United Kingdom
19 Jan 2012 11:04AM
Superb PS work but I'm not sure that any of them are actually improved by being in colour. Most of the images are pretty emotive and therefore, in my opinion, better in the original mono.

It may be more appropriate to use this technique on old holiday photos. Smile
nik111 e2
6 2.1k United Kingdom
19 Jan 2012 11:17AM
You beat us to it! News Story

Personally, I think 'The Burning Monk' shot looks more powerful in colour, others I'd leave in black & white.
JohnParminter 7 1.3k 14 England
19 Jan 2012 11:33AM
I wonder if she would consider converting my colour photos to black and white 'cos I'm crap at that. On the evidence she'd make a better job.
Kris_Dutson 12 8.2k 1 England
19 Jan 2012 11:44AM
Whatever your views, and personally I love 'em, you can't deny that they are superbly done. I love the one of Winston Churchill in the the wood panelled 'office' as it seems to enhance his presence and make him look far more powerful than the original mono shot.
User_Removed 10 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
19 Jan 2012 11:58AM
It's intricately done and done well but she's guessing the colours for many objects and that's rewriting history and that's fakery.
JohnParminter 7 1.3k 14 England
19 Jan 2012 12:03PM

Quote:It's intricately done and done well but she's guessing the colours for many objects and that's rewriting history and that's fakery.


Aye but so is all photography Chris, a photograph is just a replication of real life so does it all really matter?
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
19 Jan 2012 12:11PM
I think the burnginmonk and the Pearl harbour look more emotive in colour but the others seem better in the original B&W.



Quote:Not sure they are all out of copyright yet (70 years after death of photographer? - or has that changed?) so what is the legality?

Would this count as 'derivative work' and therefore justifiable?



Quote:that's rewriting history and that's fakery.


So you don't agree with adjusting white balance for dramatic effect...? or making sunsets 'more dramatic' by saturating or adding contrast? Yes I'm prodding you with a big pointy stick, but at the same time your comment seems hyperbolic. What about restoration of photos or paintings?
I just see this as an extension of the the ages-old retouching argument.
User_Removed 10 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
19 Jan 2012 12:12PM
I prefer my history to be as accurate as possible. A real colour photograph would tell us the correct colour for someone's sweater, a false colour one won't.

If you'd took that Civil War battle picture on a dark, depressing day you might be just a little bit annoyed that someone had coloured it in nice and pretty?
Coleslaw e2
9 13.4k 28 Wales
19 Jan 2012 12:14PM
Excellent works.
JohnParminter 7 1.3k 14 England
19 Jan 2012 12:16PM

Quote:It's intricately done and done well but she's guessing the colours for many objects and that's rewriting history and that's fakery.


Actually Chris, is she rewriting history?

Isn't history what these people did, their actions and consequences of real life events. A photo is only a reminder of the past not actual history, isn't it?

She may be changing a replication of someone from history but will that actually effect events, I wonder? only the perception of it perhaps.

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