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City Centre Parking.


lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
8 Aug 2012 1:42PM

Quote:Meanwhile railtrack which seems to cause all their other problems is still in public ownership.


PMSL, no need to let reality interfear with your idiology. Railtrack was a private company which went in to voluntary liquidation (terribly efficent of them) and was nationalised into Network Rail. But then I suppose the problems were all caused by the public sector then too.

Like I say the idea that a private company is naturally more efficent is just complete tosh, though quite often the exponents of this theory get to redefine "efficency" into what ever they want it to. Competion can mean that only the best companies survive, but there is often plenty of room for the mediocre and the just plain awful.

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collywobles e2
10 3.4k 9 United Kingdom
8 Aug 2012 6:45PM

Quote:but a lot of local businesses, local to us that is, went 'bust' when Tesco built a Supermarket just 5 miles away - out of town.


I certainly do not dispute that this happened but it did not happen because towns charge for parking your car. As I said, you can get virtually evertything you need from a large out of town supermarket, pay once, have it packed for you and if you ask someone, will wheel it out to the car for you -- and toboot its normally cheaper prices and offers than town shopping. That why Tesco's and the like's are so sucessful - they provide what the customer wants. Nothing to do with parking charges¨

If you want to reduce council costs you can always do away with free bus passes which would be a good start.
11 Sep 2012 11:38AM
Looks like a bit of common senseSmile Price Cut
montechoro e2
12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
12 Sep 2012 5:23PM
I have worked for both Local Authority and private sector employers. Both make mistakes and both have good and bad managers.

Neither are immune from illogical decisions and wasting money.

In the private sector, I once had to spend £900k in 12 weeks before the end of the financial year because a tier of senior account managers had all put some money in their bottom drawers "in case of a rainy day" but unless the money was spent they would all have their budgets reduced the following year - so we had to find a legitimate and genuine way to spend the money in 12 weeks.

We did it, just - but how do managers at this level get to have so much money remaining unspent and unallocated in their budgets with 12 weeks left of the financial year?

Who manages the managers?
Focus_Man 4 481 631 United Kingdom
12 Sep 2012 5:43PM

Quote:the parking is free all the time and the town is booming, only one empty and one charity shop.
All towns should stop being so greedy and follow Bolsover and then less people would go to the shopping malls.
Dave



I had this rant on here recently and was told that if parking were to be free people would still go to shopping malls.

I AGREE WITH YOU.

the differencer with councils is they are spending TAX PAYERS MONEY.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
12 Sep 2012 5:48PM

Quote:All towns should stop being so greedy and follow Bolsover and then less people would go to the shopping malls


If they introduced free parking were I live, there will be nowhere to park and the shops will suffer.
montechoro e2
12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
12 Sep 2012 5:49PM
My wife and sister in law go to the malls, shop, have a coffee and a cake, shop, have lunch, shop, go to the cinema and then come home.

The malls have turned shopping into a social event - they go beyond "just shopping" - they've become meeting places as well.

The times they are a changin'
collywobles e2
10 3.4k 9 United Kingdom
13 Sep 2012 9:08AM

Quote:All towns should stop being so greedy and follow Bolsover and then less people would go to the shopping malls.


Not true, as Montechoro points out above, shopping malls now provide an experience much greater than just shops.
mdpontin e2
10 6.0k Scotland
13 Sep 2012 10:28AM

Quote:The malls have turned shopping into a social event - they go beyond "just shopping" - they've become meeting places as well.

A long time ago, that's how people used their local town centre, I believe. The out-of-town shopping centre offers two advantages, though - greater convenience for those with cars, i.e. parking which is usually both adequate and free, and protection from bad weather.

I do think that local authorities have in many cases got to accept a large part of the responsibility for the demise of the "high street". It's no use decrying the rise of the out-of-town shopping megacentres, while at the same time giving permission for their construction. Likewise, undermining the competiveness of town centre businesses by charging exorbitant business rates and simultaneously making it less easy for would-be shoppers to get there (ever decreasing on-street parking, ever higher parking charges, more traffic schemes which squeeze traffic into bottlenecks in an attempt to make public transport seem more attractive) simply tips the balance even further.

Personally I try to avoid anything associated with the dreaded "shopping" as far as possible. Tongue However, the last time I checked, a town not far from where I live had a thriving town centre, which they had nurtured by a combination of competively-priced off-street parking, pedestrianisation of the main thoroughfares, and a viable park-and-ride system. As far as I'm aware, they don't have any out-of-town shopping complexes, or at least they didn't last time I was there.
macroman e2
11 15.3k England
13 Sep 2012 10:30PM
I dislike shopping espcially the weekly, trek aound Morrison's, luckily my daughter usually acts as locum, thus allowing me to avoid the chore.
My idea of shopping is to know exactly what I want, pop into the store that stocks it, pay for it and then trundle back home, job done.
I don't see shopping as a social event, just a necessity.
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
13 Sep 2012 10:39PM

Quote:My idea of shopping is to know exactly what I want, pop into the store that stocks it, pay for it and then trundle back home, job done.

Sounds like a lot of work.
My idea of shopping is to know exactly what I want, click on it, pay for it and then wait for it to be delivered, job done.

Since the Jaccobs down the road to work shut down I don't actually go into any shops anymore.


Quote:I don't see shopping as a social event, just a necessity

I'm with you, it's a man thing Wink
JJGEE
10 6.4k 18 England
14 Sep 2012 10:23AM

Quote:pay for it and then wait for it to be delivered,

But somebody has to be at Home to receive the delivery ! !

Then if you are not "in" there is so much hassle re-arranging the delivery or going to the Post Sorting Office to collect it.

For Groceries I would rather walk to Waitrose ( 5 minutes ) wander round ( 15 minutes ) then walk home ( 5 minutes ) .... job done Wink
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
14 Sep 2012 10:25AM

Quote:But somebody has to be at Home to receive the delivery ! !

Usually someone in at our house - if not it goes next door.
Groceries they give you a timed slot anyway.
mdpontin e2
10 6.0k Scotland
14 Sep 2012 10:39AM

Quote:But somebody has to be at Home to receive the delivery ! !

There's no guarantees even then. I've been in waiting on a delivery (not groceries), seen a truck from the courier arrive...then nothing. Checked the tracking page on their website: item could not be delivered, no answer at address! Phoned them up, argued with them for some 15 minutes as to whether or not I was at home (something you'd think I would know), and finally they agreed to send out a 'manager' to deliver the item in person. Nothing happened. Checked the website again: item could not be delivered, no answer at address!!

I eventually found (after the householder had come over to give me the "we tried to deliver but you were out" cards which had been pushed through his door) that they'd driven into my road, stopped almost within touching distance of my house, then walked across an area of public open space, in through the back entrance of a courtyard which was really part of a nearby street, and gone to the same house number there. Not just once, a total of around 3 or 4 times, I think it was. Now okay, the house numbering is a bit challenging round my way, but you'd think somebody might have thought about why the access to a house would involve trekking across some grass and through a space between two houses.

I wonder - do they, or should they, use GPS co-ordinates in some way? For example, "we delivered to house number x, co-ords blah and bleh, signed for by squiggle." Customer phones up to say they never received the item. Check the GPS co-ordinates and see whether it was delivered to the correct address. Let's face it, the electronic 'signature' they use is almost never even close to recognisable as a signature, so I don't see how it's proof of anything.
lemmy e2
7 2.1k United Kingdom
14 Sep 2012 3:16PM
I spend several months every year in France. Apart from central city streets, most parking is free. Where there is central parking charged for, in Carcassonne, for example, it's not usually more than about 60p an hour, more usually less than that.

I have just been to the Friday market in the central place in Limoux and spent 30 or forty Euros on vegetables, cheese etc. If I had to pay to park, I'd just buy everything in the Leclerc supermarket on the edge of town where I do my basic weekly shop. Instead, I park free down by the river and walk the couple of minutes into the centre, usually have a coffee and buy some bread while I'm there. Councils here are trying to keep the markets and centres alive in the face of the onslaught from the supermarkets.

British councils seem intent on making town centres hostile and expensive for shoppers, unless you go to the bars in the evenings and nights, when drunken and rowdy behaviour is aided and abetted by indulgent police and councils thinking only of the revenue from their business rates.

It's an odd policy, persecute the shopper but nurture the yob.

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