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Ewanneil
Ewanneil  41118 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2011 - 8:56 PM

I only used washing-up liquid on an old helmet because I knew about the salt problem. I just wanted to see what would or wouldn't remove bugs. My bike (and gear) is just as precious to me as my camera so I am very careful.

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19 Dec 2011 - 8:56 PM

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Jestertheclown
19 Dec 2011 - 9:28 PM

Fibreglass helmets were pretty much proofed against anything that you might want to clean them with. I seem to remember car polish (not T-Cut) was a favourite and my crash helmets were cleaned so infrequently that old age killed off the rubber edges long before any contaminant or salt could have done!
It was the cheap polycarbonate ones that used to degrade if they came into contact with certain things. Cellulose paints and thinners were definitely to be avoided.
These days, crash helmet designs are buried in layers of lacquer anyway, so the chances of contaminating the shell itself are remote.

Last Modified By Jestertheclown at 19 Dec 2011 - 9:29 PM
BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2011 - 9:40 PM

motorcycle helmets are 'meant' to be changed every two to four years to to UV etc degradation.....

i did see a helmet once that someone had tried to get the 'annoying gold sticker' off the back of, with thinners, because 'the glue wouldn't come off' and it melted a hole in it. lol Grin

Jestertheclown
19 Dec 2011 - 10:30 PM


Quote: motorcycle helmets are 'meant' to be changed every two to four years to to UV etc degradation.....

I've never taken much notice of anything telling me to replace something becausec of UV or similar degradation. That always smacks of ozone layers, greenness and climate change, or whatever the believers are calling it this week.
I used to change my crash helmets about once a year because they'd become worn out.
Either through testing the co-efficient of friction betwen fibreglass and tarmac or because the internals got stretched and the things no longer fitted.
Mind, I was doing getting on for two thousand miles a week sometimes.

Last Modified By Jestertheclown at 19 Dec 2011 - 10:31 PM
BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2011 - 10:43 PM


Quote: motorcycle helmets are 'meant' to be changed every two to four years to to UV etc degradation.....
I've never taken much notice of anything telling me to replace something becausec of UV or similar degradation. That always smacks of ozone layers, greenness and climate change, or whatever the believers are calling it this week.
I used to change my crash helmets about once a year because they'd become worn out.
Either through testing the co-efficient of friction betwen fibreglass and tarmac or because the internals got stretched and the things no longer fitted.
Mind, I was doing getting on for two thousand miles a week sometimes.

!! the word 'tyres' springs to mind, lol

User_Removed
19 Dec 2011 - 10:48 PM

Is the logic in this thread that if something is safe to be used on babies then it must be okay for cameras and lenses? That needs a rethink.

Jestertheclown
19 Dec 2011 - 10:53 PM


Quote: !! the word 'tyres' springs to mind, lol

Yep!
And brake pads.
And an oil change every weekend.

I didn't achieve that every week. For years I only rode to and from work and I rode motorbikes because I liked doing so the rest of the time. In fact, I've never bothered to learn how to drive a car. Well, not legally, anyway.
I began amassing those kinds of mileages when I turned to working as a motorcycle courier and gained a reputation for turning out in all weahers and preferring to cover the long distance jobs whenever I could.
That was the most enjoyable job I've ever done. And the best payer too.

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2011 - 11:00 PM

i've often thought of that as a job, loved motorbikes since my first at 16. Smile I'm down to two in the garage now though. Smile

User_Removed
19 Dec 2011 - 11:06 PM

Bloggs, you know how I told you in your other thread that even though you had lost control of it at least it hadn't gone off topic?

Welcome to the ePz forums.

Jestertheclown
19 Dec 2011 - 11:09 PM

I don't have one at all these days.
I couldn't afford to keep one on the road apart from the fact that I now have a ten year old daughter to consider.
As for the courier business, that almost completely died a death about twenty years ago when the cost of motorcycling soared and computers and faxes were becoming commonplace.
At one time, you couldn't step off of the kerb in London without risking being hit by a loony on a CX or a Gt550.
Nowadays, they're a rarity.

Jestertheclown
19 Dec 2011 - 11:10 PM

Hi Chris!

User_Removed
19 Dec 2011 - 11:11 PM

Hi Jester!

Am I right in thinking that in some cities couriers have switched from motorbikes to pedal bikes?

Jestertheclown
19 Dec 2011 - 11:20 PM

Yes.
That was happening all those years ago when I was doing it and some of them were b****y good at it too.
It was at least as quick, if not quicker to send an item by cycle courier than with one of us. They'd beat us hands down in traffic by using the pavements and alleyways as shortcuts.
They must have made a fortune at it too. The ones that worked for the companies that I worked for got paid the same rate per mile that we did but had almost no overheads. Obviously, they did a lot fewer miles than we did but on a slow day, they'd be laughing.
That was one of the reasons that I preferred to take the long distance stuff.

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2011 - 11:30 PM

dragons den signed up the first WALKING couriers a few months back.... Grin based in big cities etc.

Jestertheclown
19 Dec 2011 - 11:37 PM

I think that the first walking couriers, albeit by a different name, were the office juniors who got despatched carrying documents as the recession(s) of the eighties took hold.
Businesses that had, at one time had cart blanche to call for a courier to transport someting across the road (yes, really!) suddenly found that it was an extremely expensive method of transporting all but the most important or time sensitive cargoes.

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