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Comet falls to Earth

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jondf
jondf  72473 forum posts
13 Nov 2012 - 7:34 AM


Quote: To get back to the original point of the thread, She-who-must-be-obeyed and I went to our local Comet to see whether they had any nice lap-top deals in their closing down sale. The prices weren't exactly generous and we can do better at Misco

Still not putting the customer first?



Quote: ....and that eventually you loose the ability to try products out

Don't think that's as important to consumers these days. They'll have read reviews and have a fair idea of what they want beforehand. Don't these places offer impatient consumers the opportunity to 'have it now' for a top-loaded price?

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13 Nov 2012 - 7:34 AM

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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214407 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
28 Nov 2012 - 5:30 PM


Quote: There is a difference between what you are required to pay and what you go out of your way to avoid

Looks like some ones been and rubbed it in a bit here Smile

starbucks-tax-evasion.jpg

parallax
parallax e2 Member 4106 forum postsparallax vcard United Kingdom
29 Nov 2012 - 11:56 AM

It's a case of whether we want our towns to become empty shells in the face of cheaper internet purchases.

Long term unemployment will just increase as more retailers go bang.

The playing field has to be leveled whereby these American w*nker companies are made to pay their tax obligations in the countries that they operate.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139370 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
29 Nov 2012 - 12:10 PM


Quote: It's a case of whether we want our towns to become empty shells in the face of cheaper internet purchases.

Change is inevitable. Unless high street shops can match (or better) internet prices, they will not survive: there is nothing sacrosanct about it.

I have already started buying consumables on the web, which I used to be to buy from shops, but are now hard to find.

lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1013939 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
29 Nov 2012 - 12:37 PM


Quote: Unless high street shops can match (or better) internet prices, they will not survive

Or alternatively add value so the price difference is less of a bother to people.
Apple stores are busy and full of customers because people see the value in talking to the guys in the shop as they are knowledgeable about their product.
In PC World & Comet the most you ever get is them reading the card to you, so you might as well buy off the web.

SteveHunter
29 Nov 2012 - 12:50 PM

I'm sorry so many people will lose their jobs, but I'm not sorry to see COMET go really, the company had the most dreadful Customer Support I have come across. The staff that worked in the stores always seemed friendly and helpful but telephone support were just useless.

I bought an expensive fridge freezer from COMET about a year ago and it had a built in water dispenser. Unfortunately this water dispenser leaked, which occasionally meant having unwanted water all over the kitchen floor. It was a faulty part and the remedy was simple, I could have bought the new part myself from spares2u for £30.00.

Phoned COMET and they agreed to get a replacement part, 6 weeks later I received a new shelf for the fridge.

Phoned them again and they sent out another part, this time a water dispenser for a different make of fridge.

Phoned them again and this time I got a water dispense for a different model of fridge.

At this point the fridge was about 6 months old, I was getting a bit frustrated, so as they couldn't repair it asked for a refund.

Arranging the refund took about 8 weeks, and in order to get it my wife actually spoke to and got authorisation for the refund from the boss of OpCapita.

We had to go to the store with my Credit Card in order for them to process the refund. The staff were fully aware we were coming and were very nice. They couldn't believe we had managed to get a refund from COMET, it was the first any of them had ever come across. They were also dismayed by how useless the telephone support people were.

The faulty fridge, worth about £800.00, requiring a £30.00 part to fix, was scrapped.

We bought a replacement from AppliancesOnline, it was cheaper, better and delivered the next day.

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139370 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
29 Nov 2012 - 12:58 PM


Quote: people see the value in talking to the guys in the shop as they are knowledgeable about their product.

I very rarely want to talk, face-to-face to anyone about what I am buying. There is usually vastly more information, from a variety of sources, on the web.

The people in-store will tell you what they think you want to hear. It is rare for them to say (for example), "Oh I wouldn't buy this one - they are not reliable"

RichardN00
RichardN00 e2 Member 7397 forum postsRichardN00 vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
29 Nov 2012 - 1:30 PM


Quote: It is rare for them to say (for example), "Oh I wouldn't buy this one - they are not reliable"

Unless the alternative is more expensive/has more commission Sad

lemmy
lemmy  61676 forum posts United Kingdom
30 Nov 2012 - 7:18 PM


Quote: Spot on Lobsterboy, there is a social resposibility to pay your fair share

I buy all my wine and beer in France thus avoiding paying UK stupid tax rates on it. I haven't paid the absurd UK tax rate on alcohol since 1990. What I do is perfectly legal and above board. I take it that I am not paying my fair share and thus avoiding my social responsibility.

The size of the black market in the UK is about estimated 7% of GDP - that's about £168Bn for 2011. It dwarfs anything avoided by multi-national companies. Has anyone told those British citizens involved that they are avoiding their social responsibility? Or is it all down to those awful multi-national companies like Amazon whom we obviously all boycott because we disapprove so strongly Wink

collywobles
1 Dec 2012 - 10:07 AM


Quote: I buy all my wine and beer in France thus avoiding paying UK stupid tax rates on it. I haven't paid the absurd UK tax rate on alcohol since 1990. What I do is perfectly legal and above board. I take it that I am not paying my fair share and thus avoiding my social responsibility.

No! What you are doing is fine. I presume as a UK tax payer you have paid the correct amount of tax on your income to HMRO. So you decide to go to France and buy your alchohol and in doing so you pay to the French Tax Authorities the required amount of tax on the purchase. Nothing wrong with that at all, but that is not what Starbucks, Google and Amazon are doing. I also admire you for making contributions to the profits of the Ferry Companies, or Eurotunnel and also Shell & BP whilst doing your alchohol runs. If the couple of quid you save is more important than the time wated in these runs then 'fill yer boots'.

The UK black market is also a different issue, if the alchohol you buy is for your personal use thats OK, but if you resell it then you deserve to be clapped in irons in the Tower as a UK Tax Fidler.

Last Modified By collywobles at 1 Dec 2012 - 10:12 AM
thewilliam
1 Dec 2012 - 11:16 AM

Rich people and corporations do "tax mitigation": it's the ordinary people who indulge in "tax avoidance". There's a world of difference!

mikehit
mikehit e2 Member 45782 forum postsmikehit vcard United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
1 Dec 2012 - 4:40 PM


Quote:
The UK black market is also a different issue, if the alchohol you buy is for your personal use thats OK, but if you resell it then you deserve to be clapped in irons in the Tower as a UK Tax Fidler.

Are you saying that buying black market alcohol for personal use is fine and socially 'responsible' but reselling it is not?

collywobles
1 Dec 2012 - 6:39 PM

Going to France and buying booze for personal consumption is not black market, but, if you sell it on then it is.

cathal
cathal  9492 forum posts Ireland4 Constructive Critique Points
13 Dec 2012 - 2:17 AM

What Amazon and Starbucks are doing is perfectly legal and above board. Frankly, if they were not to do this then the shareholders would be kicking the directors out! No company or individual wants to pay any more tax than the law dictates they should. The people running these companies have a duty to their shareholders to maximize their profits so they can enhance the return on their investments. Yes, on the outside listening to soundbites it all sounds dodgy... but taxation in business is complex. Just as US companies are using tax laws to their advantage in the UK, so to are UK companies using such laws in other countries. Taxation needs to be harmonised across markets, which would be one hell of a challenge.

Many retail sectors, and governments, have failed to identify the challenges that on-line trading creates, and act accordingly. Retail, particularly, has a tough time. In my mind there is absolutely no doubt that a lot of the high street as we know it will simply disappear in the next few years. The reasons? Falling margins, increased costs, and declining sales. Their case isn't helped by large corporations having the ability to use taxation to their advantage, but by itself that's not the issue. (Corporation tax is, after all, due on profit so they still have to make that!) Most electrical / technology stores have as a rule failed to have a unique selling point other than price, which is a very risky business model. They have set their stores up to provide a poor customer experience, so customers have no issues in going online.

But, and it's a big but, the collapse of retail has another very serious issues for the economy as whole. Aside the large unemployment it brings and the costs associated with that. Retailers needs shopping centres and retail parks. If these are empty, the pension fund that owns them loses money, meaning less return for you and me on our pensions.

January is a big month for retail collapse. Administrators and receivers like to wait until the tills are full with Christmas money before they pounce.

monstersnowman
13 Dec 2012 - 6:57 AM


Quote: I buy all my wine and beer in France thus avoiding paying UK stupid tax rates on it. I haven't paid the absurd UK tax rate on alcohol since 1990. What I do is perfectly legal and above board. I take it that I am not paying my fair share and thus avoiding my social responsibility.

No! What you are doing is fine. I presume as a UK tax payer you have paid the correct amount of tax on your income to HMRO.

Ridiculous and ill thought out logic here ... I presume all the people who shop at the tax dodging coffee companies have also paid tax on their income .. So I presume by your logic, if any uk tax is avoided by the coffee companies selling you the cup of coffee (as long as it is legal - which it is) it is fine because the money used to buy it was also taxed by HMRO at source. I presume you mean HMRC.

Tax is meant to be paid on virtually each and every event of cash transfer (you earn money and pay tax, you spend it and pay tax, they earn your money and pay tax, they spend it and pay tax etc etc etc and it is claimed back where necessary) and to say its ok to avoid tax on part of the chain of expenditure/earnings because someone at some point in the never ending chain paid tax is ridiculous. Every penny we have has been subject to taxation so by your logic that now allows us to avoid taxation on whatever we use it to purchase .... Which would mean nobody pays tax and everyone has the moral and legal right to avoid any further taxation. It's a nice idea but it means no government budget whatsoever ...

Last Modified By monstersnowman at 13 Dec 2012 - 7:02 AM

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