Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Computers & Storage


janovilas e2
10 218 England
11 Jul 2013 5:18PM
I'm in the position of having to replace my main workstation after its sudden demise (a year earlier than I'd budgeted for Sad ) and that led me to wonder what type of kit other people use (I'm primarily interested in the pros here, although if you're not, don't feel that you can't add to the discussion). I'm also interested to see how long you keep your images for and what type of storage systems you have to cope with your imaging requirements.

Do you have backups for your computer gear too as you do for your camera kit?

Just for the record, I don't want this to turn into a Mac vs PC debate, as I'll be sticking to my current platform (PC).

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

thewilliam e2
6 4.9k
11 Jul 2013 7:22PM
I'm a vulgar professional and have learned that it's essential to back up all essential kit, including computers.

From time to time one or other of my imaging machines does go wrong, but the majority of faults have been repairable and most of the problems have been cheap to fix. Get yours checked out before scrapping it and salvage what parts you can. We have a lot of computers and tend to devote a machine to each important task. This machine, for example is used only for web contact.

We use CAD workstations with powerful processors and masses of storage, like having internal bays for 6 HDDs. Older machines cascade down to do less demanding tasks.
lawbert e2
7 1.8k 15 England
11 Jul 2013 7:57PM

Quote:This machine, for example is used only for web contact.


But yet despite you being a vulgar professional your machine fr web contact seems to be failing in uploading an image to your galleryTongueWink

How unprofessional is thatWink
11 Jul 2013 10:31PM
I had a similar problem earlier this year, so I can appreciate your problem.

I ended up making one up myself - new 750W PSU and case, Asus motherboard, lots of memory, I7 Processor and Blu-Ray drive - around 600 all-in. We also have a 17 inch laptop that we do final album layouts on - the portability helps when going to visit clients at home.

We backup to both local drives (WD 3Tb drives mostly) and Cloud storage and have images from the last 10 years to hand.

I'd agree with thewilliam - salvage what you can and upgrade the rest. I have to say that this latest pc is now the mutts nutts - fast as fury and silent while it does it - and most of the parts were suggested by ephotozine members at the time.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
11 Jul 2013 10:31PM

Quote:failing in uploading an image to your gallery

you're in the wrong thread - you need this one http://www.ephotozine.com/forums/topic/no-portfolio---why--104187/p-0 Wink
janovilas e2
10 218 England
11 Jul 2013 10:32PM
The current box will be stripped for parts (the motherboard is faulty as is one of the HDDs) and the usable ones will be put to use further down the chain of PCs in our house. The PC is a home built machine and has lasted for just over 6 years without modification - although it has had the OS rebuilt at least once. I'm hoping to put something together that will last just as long and be even more suited to my needs as a photographer than the last one (less reliance on proprietary on-board RAID systems for example!)

For storage, do you use internal HDDs, external HDDs or NAS units? Or something entirely different?

At the moment mine are stored on NAS units but before the main PC died, there was a copy stored on a local RAID system. My archive is already several Tb and obviously growing steadily all the time. A local copy is significantly faster to work with than a network copy (as I have been finding recently), and I have been missing the extra grunt that the workstation had compared with the laptop that I'm currently using.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
11 Jul 2013 10:48PM

Quote:Do you have backups for your computer gear too as you do for your camera kit?
Yes. I've generally kept an older computer for a while, not an ideal spare, but good enough to cover while fixing a breakdown.

I'm not operating professionally as a photographer, but it may be useful to say, the main PC is now an i5 quad core with 4G ram, and there are actually two backups, a desktop and laptop, but both are only dual core. That could be a problem as software becomes more resource intensive.
Ideally I would get a new laptop as a versatile second stringer, but thus far the specs I want are more than I'm willing to spend, and as I don't have a business case for getting it, I'm just carrying on as is.
Later in the year I expect to upgrade the PC with at least another 4GB ram, and probably an SSD drive.
Backups are on an external drive.


Quote:Get yours checked out before scrapping it and salvage what parts you can
sensible advice
11 Jul 2013 11:02PM

Quote:The current box will be stripped for parts (the motherboard is faulty as is one of the HDDs) and the usable ones will be put to use further down the chain of PCs in our house. The PC is a home built machine and has lasted for just over 6 years without modification - although it has had the OS rebuilt at least once. I'm hoping to put something together that will last just as long and be even more suited to my needs as a photographer than the last one (less reliance on proprietary on-board RAID systems for example!) .


Yes, good call - on board RAID was a nightmare for me and took a long time to get around to retrieve data (Dell unit).

Mine is all external HDD's plus Cloud.

Suggest you put your new operating system on an SSD - wow, 7 seconds to logging in!!! - has just transformed my new pc, highly recommended!!
janovilas e2
10 218 England
11 Jul 2013 11:14PM
I'm currently thinking i7, bucket load of RAM, SSD hybrid 1Tb system drive, 4Tb Data drive...
11 Jul 2013 11:40PM
I have a 320Gb system SSD drive, and 2 internal 2Tb data drives set as mirrors. I7, 16Gb of RAM and 750W psu rounds it off...
sausage e2
10 289 United Kingdom
12 Jul 2013 11:27AM
Just recently got round to backing up my images on a regular basis - not just when I think of it. I bought a WD My Book 3TB external usb3 HD that automatically backs up (whatever you choose) all images to the drive. You can set it to continually do that when it sees changes or set it to run at certain times.
Seems to work ok, I don't have to remember to turn it on - it comes on at boot up.

Not had to restore from it yet though!

Pete
12 Jul 2013 11:41AM
I replaced my PC a few months ago. I now have an i7, 16GBytes Ram and 500GByte HDD (for system and applications) plus a 3 T Byte (for data) and run W7. The old PC is not in bad shape but has 3G Bytes Ram and currently running 32 bit Vista. I plan to use this old PC as a home server for back ups from various computers on the network. It currently has 2-3 T Bytes of drives but I will add a few more. I plan to upgrade the Vista to W8 for the home server arrangement. Though I do not like W8 for my everyday use, it does look as if the "Home Server" facility looks good and easy to use. I currently have several USB drives for back up and will continue to use the 3T USB drive as a back up and I normally keep it is a safe. I am not a professional photographer.

Dave
lemmy e2
7 2.1k United Kingdom
12 Jul 2013 6:23PM
The main thing about backups is that you should have one at another location. A musician friend of mine backs up all of her work at home, then once a week takes an up to date hard drive to her mother's place. In case of fire, theft etc.

Web backup serves the same purpose but you can never trust a third party like you trust yourself.

Everyone thinks of technical failures but other ***t happens too Sad
janovilas e2
10 218 England
12 Jul 2013 8:13PM
Good point Lemmy about offsite backups. I've got a pair of NetGear ReadyNAS units - one is in active use at the moment, the other is awaiting drives & will then be ferried off to my parents where hopefully I can figure out how to get it to talk to the other one at home.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.