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Corporate Photography rates

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    WizardCreative
    13 Sep 2010 - 11:26 AM

    Hi everyone, I'm new... pleased to meet you! Smile

    I've been running my own photo business for 2 years now, and it's certainly picking up. Since January of this year I have been delivering what I call commercial photography for small businesses, which I seem to have priced correctly as business is building in this area.

    But now I am starting to get enquiries from larger businesses, where it technically becomes corporate photography...where a whole different level of photography and planning is required.

    I've tried to work out what are suitable corporate rates, as I don't want to under price or over price. If I get it wrong either way, I'm afraid of loosing contracts. Does anyone here have any advice of what a typical cost is for corporate photos? Is it based on per image or just time?

    Thanks for any help Smile
    Sam

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    13 Sep 2010 - 11:26 AM

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    Pauldaviddrabble

    Hi Sam,

    Take a look at the NUJ freelance fees guide
    http://www.londonfreelance.org/feesguide/index.php?section=Photography
    There may be some help in that, also if you are eligible to join there is an email based group EPUK (Editorial Photographer United Kingdom and Ireland) As thier website says....

    "EPUK was founded in 1999 by a small group of photographers who wanted to create an email group to address business issues affecting photographers working in the UK and Irish markets."

    You can find them at www.epuk.org but it is all business related not camera/technique/computer tech stuff and it can be high traffic so best to set up a filter on your email program to drop all their stuff into separate folder.

    Hope you find that of some help.

    Paul

    www.pauldaviddrabble.co.uk
    www.blog.pauldaviddrabble.co.uk

    samfurlong
    7 Oct 2010 - 9:31 AM

    A word about EPUK... I joined a few years back and was astonished by the amount of moaners, whingers and wannabes on there (their joining criteria didn't seem to be very rigorously enforced). Very few people (that were active, at any rate) on there who were that helpful, it proved to be more of an annoyance than a helpful resource. Upto 100 emails a day, mostly filled with doom and gloom, filled my inbox and I got next to nothing out of it in benefits / advice etc..

    I stayed about 2 months before unsubscribing.

    LensYews
    LensYews  51300 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
    7 Oct 2010 - 1:56 PM


    Quote: But now I am starting to get enquiries from larger businesses, where it technically becomes corporate photography...where a whole different level of photography and planning is required.

    It probably best to base it on your day rate (covering your costs, expenses realated to the job and allowing for some profit) and taking into account the additional time for planning and post production. A corporate shoot could easily be three/four days work in total. Then when you come up with a rate, cross check that against competitors in the same area. Bear in mind however that some people will equate quality with cost, so if the figure is too low they will think the quality won't match the standard they expect. A larger company will also probably want to use the image in more than one distribution channel (e.g printed advert, online, newsletter, etc) and so you will want to make sure your licensing model offer single or multiple uses and time periods and adjusts the total cost as appropriate.

    There's some useful information on the AOP site about all of this.

    grantly
    grantly  9 United Kingdom
    18 Oct 2012 - 8:10 PM

    Really difficult to price your fees correctly. Its a good point that if you go too low you will be perceived as cheap and your work will reflect that. Also sometimes clients will ask for quotes from several photographers and will be looking at costs rather than creativity. I would suggest that you set your stall out and if asked you can reduce fees if a client is interested but feels your rates are too high. These are my[link removed] in London.

    Last Modified By Moderator Team at 10 Jul 2013 - 6:12 PM
    grantly
    grantly  9 United Kingdom
    12 Nov 2012 - 11:34 AM

    I think the best way to price your service is to look at what other photographers are charging as that is exactly what your potential client will be doing. I have revised my [link removed] to keep them in line with the slow economy and what competitors are offering.

    Last Modified By Moderator Team at 10 Jul 2013 - 6:12 PM
    DT01
    DT01  569 forum posts
    13 Nov 2012 - 8:51 AM


    Quote: I have revised my corporate photography prices to keep them in line with the slow economy and what competitors are offering.

    why not charge based on the quality of your work and the intended use that our client has for your images? You look like you're undercharging by quite a margin.

    grantly
    grantly  9 United Kingdom
    13 Nov 2012 - 9:08 AM

    I have had this said to me before- and for many years I charge more but worked less- over the last 20 years and even though we are in a recession my business is doing better than ever- i now have a greater volume of work- but make less per commission- i have started offering a [link removed by epz] service where with other photographers working as freelancers but under the banner of my site we can always cover any jobs that come in.

    Last Modified By Moderator Team at 13 Nov 2012 - 9:58 AM
    ade_mcfade
    ade_mcfade  1014731 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
    13 Nov 2012 - 11:35 AM

    hate it when you just get asked what your day rate is BEFORE they've even mentioned the job....

    try to do the politician thing of answering the question by saying something completely different... quality, creativity, benefits to their business, quote previous testiomonials etc... with those types, it's usually the that talks

    Sometimes you quote it and know you'll never hear from them again, others you quote it and know you should have gone higher...

    DT01
    DT01  569 forum posts
    14 Nov 2012 - 9:34 AM

    If the first question is price driven (as it often is) and the answer is specific e.g: '500,' it's always going to be a 'take it or leave it' scenario. Discussions about production quality, usage and their actual needs may never even be entered into. If you start by establishing what they actually need before talking about price, the dynamic of the discussion should be significantly different than simply answering the 'what's your day rate?' question.

    Last Modified By DT01 at 14 Nov 2012 - 9:35 AM
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