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CS6 colour settings


LUDDITE 7 4 United Kingdom
17 Jun 2013 8:09PM
Hi anybody know what colour settings I need on Photoshop CS6 for my Epson Photo R800?

I have just spent an hour waiting for “livechat” on the Adobe site & given up!
CS6 is set- colour settings are – Europe general purpose 3 CMYK – coated FOGRA39.& my screen is calibrated using Pantone huey.I printed on Epson premium photo paper using Epson inks.
The jpeg I tried printing came out extremely dark (a grey dog came out black). In desperation I have printed using an old copy of Photoshop Elements 6.0 & got a perfect print.
Any ideas?

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redsnappa 12 2.0k United Kingdom
17 Jun 2013 9:51PM
Have you ticked the 'allow Photoshop to control colours' box?
GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
17 Jun 2013 11:32PM
You need to make sure you're not double-profiling, which is what redsnappa is referring to - either Photoshop or the printer has to manage the colour. Have a look at this page to understand that and other stuff (it's CS3, but the principle remains the same).

Your colour settings can almost be ignored for this purpose - although the fact that you have 'Europe General Purpose 3' set means you're working with sRGB as your RGB colour space and immediately very likely discarding some of the colours your printer can produce. Just something for you to think about. Fogra39 is an Adobe flavour of prepress profile - you don't need to concern yourself with that - doesn't matter that it's selected.

If you want to softproof the image first (preview & edit it in Photoshop in the printer/paper's colours), you go this way: view>proof setup>custom, and then pick your printer profile from the drop-down 'device to simulate' list (also choose whatever rendering intent looks best - usually relative colorimetric or perceptual). See below:

ps-custom.jpg



It's up to you whether or not you tick 'simulate paper color' - it'll dull the picture up in a bid to replicate the dynamic range of your printing paper.
LUDDITE 7 4 United Kingdom
18 Jun 2013 6:55AM
Thanks for the replies, I have set Photoshop to control colours but will check the other settings.
Thanks again, saving MUCH frustration!!Grin
janeez e2
6 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
18 Jun 2013 7:30AM
I had a similar problem a while back but following GlennH instructions should work. I have excellent results every time now. Smile
GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
19 Jun 2013 11:43AM
In case you return to this thread, below are my 'color settings' in Photoshop. There are a couple of things to note:

- ticking the profile mismatch & missing profile boxes helps you to make the best decisions when importing photos. For instance, where this is no profile embedded in a file Photoshop assigns it with the RGB working space profile automatically (i.e. Adobe RGB in this case), which can cause a colour shift if it happens to be the wrong guess. These check boxes are the equivalent of switching on a colour firewall!

- the Adobe RGB setting covers the gamut of most inkjet printers, though not quite all. That's why Photoshop Elements makes the simple association between Adobe RGB and printing. It's pointless setting this though if, for instance, you've produced sRGB files out of the camera.

Most people won't be able to see the extra colour on their monitor, so it's a 'blind' advantage that will only manifest itself in the print (a potential argument against it, though printing pundits tend not to make it). Adobe RGB typically provides a wider representation of cyan/green hues, and orange to a lesser extent, so it's advantageous to landscape photographers, less so to dedicated portrait photographers.

settings.jpg

LUDDITE 7 4 United Kingdom
19 Jun 2013 7:36PM
Thanks for the information, I was getting nowhere with any of it, until I changed the printer profile (on Epson print screen) from Photo R800 to Premium glossy paper! The result was not perfect, but now I know this, I will try the various CS6 colour settings until I get what I need.
Thanks again.GrinBlush

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