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D700 Focussing problems

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    edsephiroth
    26 Jan 2009 - 11:12 AM

    Hi.
    Having a really hard time with very slow hunting auto-focus in low-light conditions - but conditions in which my previous D300 would have coped just fine.

    Anyone got any tips on settings I might have missed?
    Anyone having the same problems?

    Btw this is using the Nikon 24-120mm VR and Tamron 17-35mm
    Thanks.

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    User_Removed
    26 Jan 2009 - 11:16 AM

    It's not likely to be the camera per se

    Are you sure you are using the same AF settings/ custom settings etc? Smile

    LenShepherd
    LenShepherd e2 Member 62431 forum postsLenShepherd vcard United Kingdom
    27 Jan 2009 - 1:29 PM

    Having used the D700 the AF is difficult to separate from the D3. As I own the D300 and D3 I agree your issue is not likely to be the camera.
    If you are using either camera in portrait mode the outer AF points for D300 and D700 are not cross type and need some thought as to where to aim with some subjects like portraits.
    The D700 AF points read from a third smaller area of the subject than the D300 - which may result in occasional differences with some AF subjects - but overall performance should be extremely close.

    garth01
    garth01  863 forum posts
    31 Oct 2011 - 8:09 PM

    I was about to post a similar question before finding this post,I upgraded my d300s to the d700 and find that in perfect studio conditions it will not focus on the subject when using the outer focus points,even when trying to focus on a static metal bar against a white wall it fails when using the outer points,move to the center ones and it locks focus straight away,its very annoying when trying to shoot kids in the studio as catching the moment is what its all about no second chances.Looking online I am happy to report that Im not alone and its been mentioned that the d700 only has 15 cross hair points out of the 51 available and it is these that are the accurate ones,any one else found this or can offer a solution? thanks Gareth

    garth01
    garth01  863 forum posts
    31 Oct 2011 - 8:12 PM

    Oh and I forgot to mention that the problem only occurs when the item the camera is trying to focus on is running perpendicular to the focus point,meaning that in landscape mode the outer points fail to lock focus when the subject is running vertically like the metal bar I mentioned in my last post, turn the camera 90 degrees and the same focus point now finds focus easily,again looking online others have reported the same issue.

    Last Modified By garth01 at 31 Oct 2011 - 8:20 PM
    dandeakin
    dandeakin  6198 forum posts England3 Constructive Critique Points
    31 Oct 2011 - 8:46 PM

    I use a D700 and D200 along side each other and have had the same problem focusing using the non-cross type outer focus points on the D700. Never seems to be a problem on the D200.

    Nick_w
    Nick_w e2 Member 73818 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
    31 Oct 2011 - 9:17 PM

    I moved from the D300 to D700 and have not really seen a problem even in very low lighting conditions. I have the 24-120 and it has no problem what so ever. Make sure there is contrast in the object your focusing on. Chose single point focus and make sure you haven't got continuous focus selected, which is for moving objects in good light.

    The only lens that hunts for me is a 100-300 with TC attached.

    garth01
    garth01  863 forum posts
    1 Nov 2011 - 11:55 AM

    I have the camera set up ad you describe and contrast is never an issue and there is plenty of light to aid focus.if I use the center focus cross hair it never fails but if I use the ones near the edges to focus on someone's eyes in portrait orientation for example it sometimes fails.I spent last night experimenting and looking online and it does hold true that not all the focus points are equal.

    LenShepherd
    LenShepherd e2 Member 62431 forum postsLenShepherd vcard United Kingdom
    2 Nov 2011 - 11:49 AM


    Quote: even when trying to focus on a static metal bar against a white wall it fails when using the outer points,move to the center ones and it locks focus straight away,

    With the camera in portrait mode is the metal bar horizontal in the frame i.e. parallel to and not at 90 degrees to the AF detection line?
    The AF detect line may be seeing only along the black line - and not detecting any detail to focus on.
    If you try again with the camera in landscape mode the outer AF points should work - not convenient for most portrait shots.
    The D700 AF points cover a smaller percentage of the picture area than on a D300. Occasionally the target (perhaps an eye) may be too small for the D700 but OK for a D300.
    Note although Nikon literature implies the outer AF points read left right (camera in landscape mode) they actually read vertically.

    garth01
    garth01  863 forum posts
    2 Nov 2011 - 10:44 PM


    Quote: even when trying to focus on a static metal bar against a white wall it fails when using the outer points,move to the center ones and it locks focus straight away,
    With the camera in portrait mode is the metal bar horizontal in the frame i.e. parallel to and not at 90 degrees to the AF detection line?
    The AF detect line may be seeing only along the black line - and not detecting any detail to focus on.
    If you try again with the camera in landscape mode the outer AF points should work - not convenient for most portrait shots.
    The D700 AF points cover a smaller percentage of the picture area than on a D300. Occasionally the target (perhaps an eye) may be too small for the D700 but OK for a D300.
    Note although Nikon literature implies the outer AF points read left right (camera in landscape mode) they actually read vertically.

    Makes complete sense to me.Now I understand the issue I can work around it but for a while I was beginning to think I was doing something wrong or had a faulty camera.

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