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D7000 advice


johnmac e2
4 91
21 Apr 2011 4:21PM
Hi all, I have a Nikon AF 20mm 1:2:8 D & AF 28-70mm 1:3.5-4.5D lens which when I use on my D5000 canít use in auto focus only focus manually. Iím looking at buying the D7000 soon and wondered if these lenses would work on the 7000 in auto focus.
I was thinking of the D300s but the only difference I can see is 12.3 MP and longer Continuous shooting compared to the 7000 16MP and according to Camera Lab tutorial 10 shots continuous in raw before camera lag sets in. Any advice appreciated

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Gaucho e2
13 2.4k 2 United Kingdom
21 Apr 2011 4:36PM
This might help:

Compatible lenses for D7000


DX AF NIKKOR: All functions supported
Type G or D AF NIKKOR: All functions supported (PC Micro-NIKKOR does not support some functions); IX-NIKKOR lenses not supported
Other AF NIKKOR: All functions supported except 3D color matrix metering II; lenses for F3AF not supported
AI-P NIKKOR: All functions supported except 3D color matrix metering II
Non-CPU: Can be used in modes A and M; color matrix metering and aperture value display supported if user provides lens data (AI lenses only)

Note: Electronic rangefinder can be used if maximum aperture is f/5.6 or faster
cameracat e2
11 8.6k 61 Norfolk Island
21 Apr 2011 6:12PM

Quote:wondered if these lenses would work on the 7000 in auto focus


Simple answer...Smile

Yes, They Auto Focus on the D7000, Because the D7000 has an on-board bocus motor, Your D5000 does not have that facility....!!!

Wink
23 Apr 2011 10:10PM
Already answered - your lenses AF on a D7000.
As an owner of a D300s and a D7000 the D300 is the one with the higher fps and close to pro spec build compared to the D7000 good build.
The D7000 has more resolution, better video, and better high ISO noise.
The UK price difference is under 15%.
You imply high fps is not particularly important to you - making the D7000 the front runner.
johnmac e2
4 91
23 Apr 2011 10:42PM
Thanks all, as always good advice. 7000 seems to be the best for me and just in my budget.
NEWMANP e2
6 1.6k 574 United Kingdom
24 Apr 2011 10:17AM
well everyone gererally disagrees with me, but if you pick up both camera you can feel the difference.

the 7000 is clearly a "consumer "camera by Nikon admission and the D300s is built like a warhorse and behaves and feels like a pro camera.

i think its main aim is testing technology for the next pro body which i guess will be a d400.

it has a nice processor which is a little faster, but the controls dont feel as solid and the aluminium body of the 7000 is not the entire chassis, which is part polycarbonate or similar.

i went to try the 7000 to replace my D200 with the intention of keeping my Fuji S5 pro as a backup , but without hesitation i bought the d300s.

the extra megapixels on the sensor dont mean a lot, the difference at A3 isnt even noticable. the real advantage with the 7000 would be weight for travel work and its ability to handle noise which is to be fair pretty outstanding. its not an issue for me but i can use the D300S at 800 iso without any concern. if you are a bird man and want to stick a 500 on the front, it would be great for the iso but i doubt the lens mount would live for long.

just a few plus/minuses for you to chew over because either body would make you happy. the d7000 it would make a superb travel camera, but i wouldnt like to bash it about on gritsone edges in winter.

the 300s is about to start tumbling in price though, i paid around £970 for the body from warehouse express, who again, contra to regular forum slatings have always given be exceptionally good service. so if it tumbles as fast as the fuji s5 pro did, it could soon be very attractive

regards
Phil
digicammad e2
11 22.0k 37 United Kingdom
24 Apr 2011 11:08AM

Quote:the 7000 is clearly a "consumer "camera by Nikon admission and the D300s is built like a warhorse and behaves and feels like a pro camera.


I agree that is where the respective cameras are targetted, but calling the 7000 a 'consumer' camera is likely to make people think it is pretty lightweight.

I haven't used the 300s, but have a 300 and recently won a 7000 in the ePz Christmas draw. Although I initially had reservations about the 7000, using it has proven that it is closer to pro spec than may at first be thought.

Although slightly lighter than the 300 it feels no less robust and has excellent water seals. Burst mode is plenty fast enough, AF performs well, all the important functions are controlled without needing the menu system and the high iso performance is excellent.

In auto bracket mode you can only take 3 shots, compared to the 300's 7, but those 3 can be at 2 stop intervals whereas the 300 could only do 1 stop. Also the 7000 has a genuine 100iso should you want it.

The 7000 uses the IR remote, but has a receptor window on the back as well as the front which removes the problem found in earlier Nikon models when trying to use them on a tripod with an IR remote.

All in all, the 7000 has become my camera of choice and I haven't (yet) found anything for which I need to go back to the 300.

HTH

Ian
Consulo e2
10 815 10 Scotland
25 Apr 2011 12:40PM
So you'd recommend the D7000, Ian (may buy one this week)?
johnmac e2
4 91
25 Apr 2011 12:48PM
Thanks for all the advice, for me I think I'll go for the 7000. It has a good review and judging by your comments its the one that suits me most.

Thasnks again
digicammad e2
11 22.0k 37 United Kingdom
25 Apr 2011 3:31PM
I would certainly say it should be on your list. If I was in the market I would make a list of things the 300s does that the 7000 doesn't and then decide how many of them you actually need enough to spend the extra.
25 Apr 2011 4:53PM

Quote:the extra megapixels on the sensor dont mean a lot, the difference at A3 isnt even noticable.

It is if shooting at 1600 ISO Smile
Resolution D7000 1600 ISO is similar to D300s at 400 ISO
The D7000 is better than a "consumer" camera, and more targeted at advanced amateurs.
The D5100 is closer to a "consumer" product.
Digressing the "consumer" D5100 is one of the first DSLR's that can take 2 images at different exposures and merge them into a HDR image - a feature I would appreciate on future Nikon Pro bodies.
I agree the D7000 is not a full pro spec body - but it has a price advantage - and 16 MP now Smile
johnmac e2
4 91
25 Apr 2011 6:53PM
Any idea when the 300 will be replaced, I heard its 2011. If it is being replaced that may mean the 7000 & 300 will come down in price.
strawman e2
11 22.0k 16 United Kingdom
25 Apr 2011 11:03PM

Quote:Any idea when the 300 will be replaced, I heard its 2011. If it is being replaced that may mean the 7000 & 300 will come down in price.
Give the current economic conditions there is a fair chance the D300 price has come as low as it will and that the D7000 price will not move when the D300 replacement comes out as it will probably launch @ £1,200 to £1,300. guess @ £100 more than the 7D? Just based on how the new camera models get priced.
I've been waiting to see what will replace the D300s but I imagine the problems in Japan, post earthquake, might affect the new releases.

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