Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


D7100 correct technique?


I just orderd a D7100 and read in a review that because there is no optical low pass filter, I should be able to take the sharpest most detailed images with the correct technique, does anyone know what this technique is?

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

Consulo e2
10 815 10 Scotland
1 Apr 2013 4:39PM
Focus on the image, then move ten foot behind the camera. Do 10 press-ups whilst singing 'Eye of the tiger', all the whilst gazing intently at the object you wish to capture. This is an ancient Nikon technique passed from one knowing tog to another, so you would do well to follow it.

In all seriousness I can't imagine that you'll have to make any real serious deviations from the current focusing techniques that you may already employ in your shooting (though if one would, I'd happily be corrected by someone more in the know). From what I understand, it's just the removal of a filter on the sensor that provides the better in-camera sharpness, so you shouldn't have to spend as much time in post applying sharpening.
1 Apr 2013 4:43PM

Quote:Focus on the image, then move ten foot behind the camera. Do 10 press-ups whilst singing 'Eye of the tiger', all the whilst gazing intently at the object you wish to capture. This is an ancient Nikon technique passed from one knowing tog to another, so you would do well to follow it.



LOL.
1 Apr 2013 6:05PM
Substitute good technique for correct technique and you'll have it in one.
This may involve using a tripod more often, using twice the focal length as a safe hand held shutter speed more often, being prepared to use manual focus more often, etc when you want to make the sharpest possible large prints.
When your aim is a 1024x768 image on the web you do not need any better technique then you use now.
Gundog e2
1 624 Scotland
1 Apr 2013 6:44PM
I think Mr Shepherd has pretty well hit it in one.

The more sophisticated cameras become, the more you can benefit from employing good techniques. Photos taken with a faulty technique won't look any worse, they just won't take full advantage of the technology available.

But the basic story is still the same. Make sure your camera is steady, focus correctly and use the correct exposure (whatever that means) and select a shutter speed and aperture to suit the intended results.

Paradoxically, the more "automated" cameras become, the more I seem to use manual exposure and manual focussing.
lawbert e2
7 1.8k 15 England
1 Apr 2013 6:59PM
I would add that a sharp bit of glass is a mustWink
1 Apr 2013 9:45PM

Quote:Paradoxically, the more "automated" cameras become, the more I seem to use manual exposure and manual focussing.


I find myself "straying" into manual now and again myself. Of course it doesn't guarantee your pictures will be any better but it certainly makes you feel better about paying hundreds or thousands for your camera and not going near the "P" setting out of embarrassment Wink
Shoot. If the shots come blurry, find what have you been doing wrong.
Check out the hands-on reviews of the D800/D800E, such as this ephotozine one: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/nikon-d800-vs-d800e-digital-slr-review-19764 . Like the D7100, the D800E drops the low pass, or AA, filter. The D800 vs. D800E reviews give excellent discussions of the theory behind, and implications of, deleting the AA filter in terms of image implications and photographic technique.
thewilliam e2
6 4.9k
5 Apr 2013 11:34PM
Without an AA filter, there is a danger of moiré but this only happens with certain patterns at certain angles. One useful dodge is to bracket by twisting the camera very slightly between shots.

Quote:Without an AA filter, there is a danger of moiré but this only happens with certain patterns at certain angles. One useful dodge is to bracket by twisting the camera very slightly between shots.
Super idea! Thanks.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.