Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Like 0

Depressed Moi?

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

New PortraitPro 12 SALE + 10% OFF code EPZROS814
Krakman
Krakman  73615 forum posts Scotland
1 Apr 2008 - 9:46 PM

Fair enough, if I understand right, you are a journalist with a PhD on the subject who has written about the subject for a long time, though you are not actually currently qualified as a practising doctor/psychiatrist, have I understood right?

There are also links that I came across that suggest that Vitamin B is not related to depression. But others suggest it is. Is the Rotterdam trials I linked to not regarded as 'randomised' enough as you apparently discount it - you say there haven't been any such trials?

You also said that taking exercise as a form of treatment is poppycock. How do you reconcile it with the Royal College of Psychiatrists advice?

Last Modified By Krakman at 1 Apr 2008 - 9:49 PM
Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links 
1 Apr 2008 - 9:46 PM

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

jakabout
jakabout  101741 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 9:49 PM

Advice is not the same as proper treatment. This is the problem with the UK health care system if you ask me......

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110247 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 9:50 PM

Strange what you can find when you folow the leads that "NLM" give you Stolzy


Quote: Depression and anxiety: Exercise eases symptoms
If you have depression or anxiety, you might find your doctor or mental health provider prescribing a regular dose of exercise in addition to medication or psychotherapy. Exercise isn't a cure for depression or anxiety. But its psychological and physical benefits can improve your symptoms.

"It's not a magic bullet, but increasing physical activity is a positive and active strategy to help manage depression and anxiety," says Kristin Vickers-Douglas, Ph.D., a psychologist at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.



you clearly know a lot about your specialist subject but you do tend to the academic's trick of selective referencing (having spent the bulk of my career in R&D I recognise the symptoms! Smile )

Last Modified By brian1208 at 1 Apr 2008 - 9:51 PM
stolzy
stolzy  83753 forum posts7 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 9:59 PM


Quote: Fair enough, if I understand right, you are a journalist with a PhD on the subject who has written about the subject for a long time, but that you are not qualified as a practising doctor/psychiatrist?

Not sure at what point this became an interview, but, since you're interested, I write clinical publications, reviews, books, monographs and other technical documentation, mostly in depression.

Quote: There are also links that I came across that suggest that Vitamin B is not related. Is the Rotterdam study I linked to not regarded as 'randomised'enough as you apparently discount it?

Its not randomised at all because its not a clinical study. the paper suggests that there are differences in B12 between depressed and normal subjects. this could be for a variety of reasons, (poor nutrition in the depressed patients springs to mind as a possibility). It does not of itself show that B12 deficiency is the cause and certainly not that B12 is an effective treatment. he clinical trials which have been done with B12 suggest it is not effective (based on a cursory examination of the abstracts)

Quote:
You also said that taking exercise is a form of treatment is poppycock. How do you reconcile it with the Royal College of Psychiatrists advice?

You need to read wht I actually said not what you'd like me to have said. Poppycock referred to the suggestion that exercise is 'one of the best' means to treat depression.

stolzy
stolzy  83753 forum posts7 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 10:00 PM


Quote:
you clearly know a lot about your specialist subject but you do tend to the academic's trick of selective referencing (having spent the bulk of my career in R&D I recognise the symptoms! )

You need to go back and read what I actually said. If you can't be bothered, you can read my later post above.

Krakman
Krakman  73615 forum posts Scotland
1 Apr 2008 - 10:02 PM


Quote: Poppycock referred to the suggestion that exercise is 'one of the best' means to treat depression

The Royal College of Psychiatrists put it 2nd on their list of 7 things you should do to combat depression.

stolzy
stolzy  83753 forum posts7 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 10:04 PM


Quote: The Royal College of Psychiatrists put it 2nd on their list of 7 things you should do to combat depression.

Sounds reasonable.

Krakman
Krakman  73615 forum posts Scotland
1 Apr 2008 - 10:11 PM

Thank goodness you got there in the end!

gcarth
gcarth e2 Member 102289 forum postsgcarth vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 10:11 PM


Quote: Sounds reasonable.

Oh, it sounds reasonable - now that you've been caught out!

Garth

stolzy
stolzy  83753 forum posts7 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 10:14 PM


Quote: Oh, it sounds reasonable - now that you've been caught out!

Rather juvenile response.
Exercise is quite effective in mild depression, I never said otherwise. It is not 'one of the best means' to treat major depression.

Last Modified By stolzy at 1 Apr 2008 - 10:15 PM
CathyT
CathyT e2 Member 87276 forum postsCathyT vcard United Kingdom18 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 10:15 PM

What is???

Can someone list them 1 to 7..

PS.....Mods....please don't lock this thread..however heated it gets.

Last Modified By CathyT at 1 Apr 2008 - 10:17 PM
pepperst
pepperst  62328 forum posts Wales4 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 10:17 PM


Quote: QuoteTongueoppycock referred to the suggestion that exercise is 'one of the best' means to treat depressionThe Royal College of Psychiatrists put it 2nd on their list of 7 things you should do to combat depression.

Works for me, but I do struggle to actually do any. Cant get the motavation.

Krakman
Krakman  73615 forum posts Scotland
1 Apr 2008 - 10:18 PM


Quote: Poppycock referred to the suggestion that exercise is 'one of the best' means to treat depression.

Don't see you saying anything about the distinction between mild and major depression. If that's what you mean, then you should have said it, rather than making incorrect and potentially harmful statements.

stolzy
stolzy  83753 forum posts7 Constructive Critique Points
1 Apr 2008 - 10:21 PM


Quote: Cant get the motavation

And thats the rub. People with major depression find it very difficult to do exercise, their levels of motivation, tiredness and energy make it nigh on impossible. It certainly helps in milder illness, but as a treatment, its not in the same league as drug therapy.

Krakman
Krakman  73615 forum posts Scotland
1 Apr 2008 - 10:22 PM


Quote: Can someone list them 1 to 7..

The RCP's 'Helping yourself' list is:

Quote: Don't keep it to yourself: If you've had some bad news, or a major upset, try to tell someone close to you, and tell them how you feel. It often helps to go over the painful experience several times, to cry about it, and to talk things over with someone. This is part of the mind's natural way of healing.
Do something: Get out of doors for some exercise, even if only for a walk. This will help you to keep physically fit, and you may sleep better. You may not feel able to work, but it is always good to try to keep active. This could be housework, do-it-yourself (even as little as changing a light bulb) or any part of your normal routine. It can help take your mind off painful thoughts which make you more depressed.
Eat well: Try to eat a good, balanced diet, even though you may not feel like eating. Fresh fruit and vegetables are particularly good. Depression can make you lose weight and run short of vitamins, which only makes matters worse.
Beware alcohol! Resist the temptation to drown your sorrows with a drink. Alcohol actually makes depression worse. It may make you feel better for a few hours, but will then make you feel worse again. Too much alcohol stops you from seeking the right help and from solving problems; it is also bad for your physical health.
Sleep: Try not to worry about finding it difficult to sleep. It can be helpful to listen to the radio or watch TV while you're lying down and resting your body, even if you can't sleep. If you can occupy your mind in this way, you may feel less anxious and find it easier to get off to sleep.
Tackle the cause: If you think you know what is behind your depression, it can help to write down the problem and then think of the things you could do to tackle it. Pick the best things to do and try them.
Keep hopeful: Remind yourself that:

you are suffering from an experience which many other people have gone through.
you will eventually come out of it, although you may find it hard to believe at the time.
depression can be a useful experience you may come out of it stronger and better able to cope. It can help you to see situations and relationships more clearly.
you may be able to make important decisions and changes in your life, which you were avoiding before.

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.