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Desperately need lighting help!

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    TSM
    TSM  3
    9 Aug 2010 - 5:21 PM

    To tell you the truth, I have a very limited knowledge of studio lighting. I've taken part in a studio shoot once, and no, it did not go well. Therefore, I need A LOT of help since I have a very important studio shoot this month Sad It's a really good opportunity for me! I have to shoot headbands for a client who has opened her own headband store online. I really only do location shoots, but since this would be so great for me I agreed for it to be a studio shoot.

    HELP? I don't even know where to start. I haven't even got lighting equipment, so I have to hire.

    This is the sort of lighting set up I'm looking for:
    bardot.jpg

    I know it's very basic, but I want to be very professional on the shoot. I want to be confident but I know that I won't be unless I know what I'm really doing! I want to attend a lighting course before I do the shoot, but I haven't got any money at the moment.

    CAN ANYONE HELP Sad

    Thanks in advance!

    Tx

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    Freefall
    Freefall e2 Member 10675 forum postsFreefall vcard United Kingdom
    9 Aug 2010 - 5:38 PM

    Not easy to provide advice - when you say you agreed to a studio shoot do you mean you're hiring a studio, or using a room you already have as a studio? If you're hiring studio space very often they can provide studio lighting assistance for a bit extra cash....worth looking around to see if you can get a decent deal....

    The lighting in the picture you included should be fairly simple to achieve something close (probably just 2 lights - one for the model to immediate camera left through a soft box, and one to light the background and blow out a part of it to white thus hiding shadows). There a variants such as using a beauty dish, but I'd go for simple (and predictable).

    Lighting is fairly easy to get the basics right, you just have to keep your eye on everything at the same time! For instance, if the model steps closer or further away, if you change the light level (either on the studio lights, or if the room lightness changes e.g. via sunlight), if you change lense aperture or ISO - they'll all impact the exposure. If things change, just take a couple of test shots to get things back to how you want them and start shooting again.

    TSM
    TSM  3
    9 Aug 2010 - 6:18 PM

    Hi, thanks for your very quick reply Smile Basically, since we both don't have money money, we're using a living room and setting up a back drop. So I will need to provide the lighting. So, you think I would just need a basic lighting set up? I can borrow that from my old college which is good.

    How is the soft look achieved in the picture? Is that through using a soft box? Also do I have to use a light meter?

    Thanks for all your help!

    Paul Morgan
    Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314810 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
    9 Aug 2010 - 7:32 PM

    Nothing fancy needed, for a very basic set up, a large window and reflector.

    Freefall
    Freefall e2 Member 10675 forum postsFreefall vcard United Kingdom
    10 Aug 2010 - 12:22 PM

    Hi again - agree with the above. If you're needing to do this on the cheap I'd go for a large window and a reflector (e.g. large window to model left, and reflector lighting the shadow areas on model right). Although if you want to use lights then go for it - just set up and practice a bit first.

    The soft look I assume is either post processing, (e.g. using a gaussian blur in PS), or achieved by using a very wide aperture (f2 etc) so that only the face is in focus and the rest is slightly blurred. A softbox doesn't affect the focus of the picture - it's used to distribute the light from a strobe / flash (soften the light)

    TSM
    TSM  3
    10 Aug 2010 - 2:17 PM

    Hi! Thanks for all your help! I have just one more question..............

    cold-cast-lightng.jpg

    What about this sort of lighting? I really like this cold cast colour involved in both images (one before too). And there's also this dreamy effect I really want to create. I think it also has a purple tint to it, am I right? Is this done with a filter?

    Thanks again for all your help! Just really want this shoot to go well for me Sad

    Grampy
    Grampy  4507 forum posts England71 Constructive Critique Points
    9 Dec 2010 - 4:19 PM

    For the soft look ,I used to stretch a very good quality black stocking over the lens, I've forgotten which make but it was expensive and had a large mesh (very transparent) I seem to remember 15 dernier if that makes any sense, (My assistant always went out to buy it) by streching it you can have different levels of diffusion. Hold it in place with an elastic band.
    Phill

    johnducguz
    22 Dec 2010 - 5:25 PM

    As your shoot is for the headbands, have you considered not using a model & shooting just the bands? They wont move so no problems with long shutter speeds if the light levels are low.
    Less space needed & no need to hire lights.

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