Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Does the genre affect you?


That's why I was pleased when the option to do do away with votes and awards was introduced.

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

TerryMcK e2
6 71 2 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 5:33PM
As Cheryl (csurry) as stated earlier, not all bird photographers spend their time "cooped up" in a hide.
Whereas I do regularly visit hides on several nature reserves, I also spend a great deal of time out in the wild, walking across fields or through woods, where acquired field craft can be very useful. This gives me the chance to discover and, hopefully photograph, wildlife in all its amazing varieties.
To spot (for instance) a bird of prey in flight or perched on some remote fence post, then get close enough to photograph it can be a rewarding challenge.
I have uploaded photographs of fast-flying Hobbies & Peregrine Falcons in flight and although the pictures were not magazine quality, they did give me a feeling of achievement & inspired me to do better.
Of course, static hides do provide an easy way to photograph birds - nothing wrong with that at all. But it is still down to the photographer to make the resulting bird-on-a-stick photograph that more interesting by carefully selecting the right background, choosing the light, waiting for the unusual pose &, of course, the all-important matter of good timing.
Many members, including myself, use some form of portable hide, thus widening the scope to record something different. There are a good number of bird/wildlife photographers on EPZ that possess a great deal of flair & imagination. And I, for one admire & respect them. Credit should be given where credit is due.
Terry
StrayCat e2
10 15.5k 2 Canada
25 Mar 2011 8:04PM
There will always be an imbalance in interest in the various genres. I think people tend to be more interested in something they can see themselves doing, than something that is so remote to them that it doesn't trigger any emotion. Landscape, wildlife, and street photography involve getting outside and moving around; being involved in physical activities other than just taking pics. I know for a fact that the reasons I am attracted to wildlife photography are because of my love of being there, experiencing the peace and solitude; the beauty and the rawness of it all. Nothing is staged, it's as it is, and it's up to you to preserve it in a photo, or series of photos. For me it's the total experience that counts, not the final image, so I guess I'm not a real photographer.Grin(another thread) As na small boy, many, many years ago, there was nothing I enjoyed more than being out and about, usually in the forest, watching wildlife; going to remote places in the wilderness with my father on his salmon fishing trips in the summer. When I look at a photo taken in such a setting, I remember the whole experience.

I think we tend to gravitate toward a genre of photography that is accessible to us; something we can get out and do ourselves, rather than just be wowed by somebody else's photos of subjects that are beyond our reach, or ambitions. How many of us are going to hire models and a studio to do nude, or glamour photography? Not a high percentage, I would say. So, would a person be interested in something that is beyond their reach, or abilities? Probably not.

I have an idea where this thread came from, but I'm not going to say, those days are long gone.Wink
Shroomer 7 14 167 England
25 Mar 2011 8:12PM
I just need another War Pete its been a long time since 1982 and had a great photo trip to Afghanistan cancelled so the PTSD must be setting back in. I very rarely sit in a small box, but do find bird photography very relaxing and therapeutic, no matter what the weather. The challenge of having no control most times over the subject fascinates me and if lousy light its just so nice to relax out in the fresh air without a care in the world, until the wife phones to check where I am Grin
Also on many days a bird togger can easily outwalk a landscaper and carring heavier gear. Nearly forgot aI always have the MissyHound with me to steal my lunch. This year I joined a camera club and now have the courage to try and venture into more fields of photography especially weddings and portraiture for the future.
The good bit with photography is always the challenge of getting that better image and taking sound advice from some on here. That winning image is always the next one.
Have a good one
Richard
tomcat e2
9 6.2k 15 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 8:12PM
I honestly believe that some folks think (mentioned earlier) that the bird on a stick images are so easy to achieve.
They perhaps are if you are using bird-lime, like some of our continental cousinsSad

Anyone who has nailed a real good shot of a Coal tit, has put a lot of time and effort into it.

They like most birds do not keep still at all.
As for hides, I enjoy the solitude of watching & hopefully photographing what comes by.
Has this thread been generated by my old maxim.....Tell it how it is and not what you want to hear

Just my thoughts...as usual

Adrian
tomcat e2
9 6.2k 15 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 8:27PM

Quote:I have an idea where this thread came from, but I'm not going to say, those days are long gone.

....and so do IWink
tomcat e2
9 6.2k 15 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 8:59PM

Quote:I appreciate the Twitchers with their hides, long lenses and tripods


I am NOT a twitcher & will never be one.

I enjoy wildlife & the photography opportunities it offers.
There is a massive difference between the two disciplines
StrayCat e2
10 15.5k 2 Canada
25 Mar 2011 9:03PM
This thread is not about birds on sticks; it's about votes.
Coleslaw e2
9 13.4k 28 Wales
25 Mar 2011 9:04PM

Quote:This thread is not about birds on sticks; it's about votes.

people see what they want to see....Wink
I see it as taking the pi55 out of Cheryl....GrinSmileTongueWink
lawbert e2
7 1.8k 15 England
25 Mar 2011 9:20PM
Bird on a stick is a very derogitary term for a photographer that has put the time and effort in to get a capture of something that moves (not buildings or people or landscapes),

To get the Bird on a stick studio qualty shot hours, days, weeks, months of work have to be put in to the capture, and theres still the chance the subject might move and give a blurry capture.

Its not like taking a seascape or the like and making the sky purple in photoshop which doesnt represent what was there when the picture was takenWink....a birds colours are always true and cant be overly manipulatedSmile

And as Mr MossyOak has so rightly said...Its an escape from reality and very therapeutic...Plus you also get to learn a bit about nature....Which cant be a bad thing....It might make us all look after it a bit moreWink
tomcat e2
9 6.2k 15 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 9:27PM
The above comment gets my approval
Pete e2
13 18.7k 96 England
25 Mar 2011 9:30PM

Quote:Bird on a stick is a very derogitary term

It may be to some. I use the phrase because it describes what it is and everyone knows what you're talking about. Easier and more general than saying "a lesser spotted chaffinch coming to rest on a moss covered branch of the oak tree angled at 87degrees and slightly moist with dew Wink
spaceman e2
10 5.2k 3 Wales
25 Mar 2011 9:31PM
Has anybody suggested that bird pics are easy? I don't think so. I think it's more to do with the fact that, like landscapes/seascapes, once you've seen a few dozen of them they do start to look pretty samey.
tomcat e2
9 6.2k 15 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 9:36PM

Quote:Has anybody suggested that bird pics are easy? I don't think so. I think it's more to do with the fact that, like landscapes/seascapes, once you've seen a few dozen of them they do start to look pretty samey.


The let's all give up and start playing Bingo or summatWink
tomcat e2
9 6.2k 15 United Kingdom
25 Mar 2011 9:38PM

Quote:It may be to some. I use the phrase because it describes what it is and everyone knows what you're talking about. Easier and more general than saying "a lesser spotted chaffinch coming to rest on a moss covered branch of the oak tree angled at 87degrees and slightly moist with dew


A tad condescending IMHO Pete

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.