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Dry Mounting using a domestic iron.


canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 1:40PM
Hi all,
Has anyone tried dry mounting a photo using mounting tissue and a domestic iron?

Do you have any tips or recommendations for this way of mounting and would it work on A3 size?

Regards

John

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KenTaylor e2
10 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 2:14PM
Its a good few years ago since I tried that I found to be hit and miss.
No doubt some skill and experience required rather more so with A3 where it would pay to practice with unwanted prints.

Setting the temperature that should be low and protecting the print that must be dry along with the mount card is critical.

I wouldn't consider it worthwhile as spray mount is so much easier and less risk to damaging the print..

Plenty of info if you Google it such as here
canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 2:30PM
Thanks Ken, which spray mount would you recommend?
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 2:40PM
I use 3M adhesive - I bought mine from Hobbycraft. It is repositionable if you need to correct any errors.


http://www.google.co.uk/shopping/product/24126786463691066?hl=en&sugexp=les%3B&gs_nf=3&gs_rn=0&gs_ri=hp&cp=6&gs_id=m&xhr=t&q=3m%20spray%20mount&pf=p&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&oq=3m+spr&gs_l=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bpcl=39650382&biw=1920&bih=1003&wrapid=tljp1355150246223010&sa=X&ei=ofPFUI3zJYO90QXBqoGgAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ8wIwAA

If you know you will be doing more in the not-too-distant future I would recommend saving them up for a batch run because once you use the can you are supposed to clear the nozzle every day to keep it from clogging up. Somepeopel are lucky and it stays clear, others rarely get through a whole can.
Non-repositionable sprays are much cheaper.
canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 2:58PM
Thanks mikehit, have you any little tips gained through experience of using it.

I find that "experience is something you get immediately after you need it"......Smile
KenTaylor e2
10 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 2:58PM
Currently use this which is where I buy most of my needs.

There are more than you can shake a stick at that are either instant grab or re positionable with the latter being more forgiving by a narrow margin when handling paper
.
I have always cleared the nozzle by using it upside down each time I have finished using it.
canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 3:09PM
Thanks all, the spray seems to be the way to go then.
I can see that there is an advantage in the "repositional" spray but is there any disadavantages with it, such as good stick, messy, bubbles, etc?
KenTaylor e2
10 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 3:36PM
No disadvantage that I have experienced. Leave some time before making the contact when I use a wide roller to gently ensure its firmly adhered all over.

I try to stand the print up at around 45 degrees to spray the print where you will find that tilting the spray when its running low will result in it being uneven.

Use methylated spirit to clean any over spray going where it shouldn't.
Use plenty of newspaper for masking, I keep intending to use a spray booth (cardboard box with two sides cut away)

Ensure its all aligned correctly with one small corner although it nearly always needs to be finely trimmed to square it all up on four sides.
canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 3:56PM
cheers ken, very helpful.
thewilliam 6 4.9k
10 Dec 2012 6:35PM
Scotch do three flavours of spray-mount. The blue can product is repositionable/temporary and was used in the good old days for pasted up artwork. From the red can, it's permanent and the stuff from the brown can sticks like brown-matter to a blanket.

Be sure to work in a well-ventilated space because it doesn't do the lungs any good.
canonfan46 5 1.1k United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 10:21PM
So thats three options then.

a. Repositional, strong stick after 12 hours.
b. Instant, permanent and strong stick.
c. Instant, permanent and very strong stick.

At first glance I would say that option a is the obvious choice and that options b & c have no advantage at all over a.

Unless I am missing something that you know about?
KenTaylor e2
10 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
10 Dec 2012 10:34PM
a, is all you need, no need for a sledgehammer to crack a nut Smile
thewilliam 6 4.9k
10 Dec 2012 11:38PM

Quote:So thats three options then.

a. Repositional, strong stick after 12 hours.
b. Instant, permanent and strong stick.
c. Instant, permanent and very strong stick.

At first glance I would say that option a is the obvious choice and that options b & c have no advantage at all over a.

Unless I am missing something that you know about?



Blue can is excellent for short-term but you need to remember that it's intended to be temporary. Before I bought a dry-mounting press, I used red or brown can.

My first dry mounting press was an enormously heavy antique that cost me about a fiver.

To answer the OP's question, I did try a domestic iron and the result was unacceptably lumpy. That's why I started using spay mount.
KenTaylor e2
10 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
11 Dec 2012 1:15PM
An alternative is the self adhesive mounting board that has no mess although I have never used it.
Britman 8 1.7k England
13 Dec 2012 4:39PM
I did a search of Youtube for 'how to' videos and the only result I got back, people where using machines.

Closest I found was dry mounting Chinese painting that where done on rice paper.





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