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DSLR Price for a begginer???

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    Stotty2910
    23 Apr 2012 - 7:17 PM

    Hey

    I have been looking around shop and internet watching videos and reviews but i cant decide what to buy.
    The two cameras i like the most are the nikon 5100 and the nikon 90d. I have looked at canon and sony but the nikon seems to fit in my hand alot nicer than the others.

    Is it worth me spending that little bit more for the 90d for my first camera ??? Or should I get the cheapest to start and then upgrade if i get more serious about photography. The type of photography I will be doin is wildlife, landscapes and some action stuff like football and rally cars. If that helps haha Grin

    Cheers
    Stotty2910 Grin

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    StrayCat
    StrayCat  1014448 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
    23 Apr 2012 - 8:00 PM

    If you go with Nikon, the D90 has an internal focusing motor and can use all of the Nikon lenses, whereas the D5100 does not, and won't auto-focus some of the older Nikon lenses.

    If you think video might be in your repertoire, the Canon 550D or 600D would be a good bet.

    Another option could be a high quality used camera body, and put your money into lenses, they are the main factor in image quality. A very good buy can be had for a Canon 40D, an excellent camera, no video though, but it is a magnesium body, weather proof camera with an excellent reputation.

    Stotty2910
    23 Apr 2012 - 8:24 PM

    The video doesnt really effect me i just want to take photo's and the canon dont feel comfortable in my hand compared with the nikon's.

    I obviously havent done my research very well as i didnt no about the internal focusing on the D90. That could save me money in the long run when buying lenses as i could get second hand ones for cheaper.

    Do you not thing £700 is alot for a beginner to spend ???

    BobEH
    BobEH  8 United Kingdom
    23 Apr 2012 - 8:50 PM

    Get a Canon 1100d body, more than enough pixels, dirt cheap. Excellent noise response. Manual, AV and Programme is all you need. Excellent Canon raw processor thrown in. Spend the extra money on a 15-85 lens. If you need more speed then save up for a 60d or 7d, but you'll need strong arms.

    BobEH
    BobEH  8 United Kingdom
    23 Apr 2012 - 8:58 PM

    Ps Don't get the D90 its old hat and too slow. The D7000 or the new D3200 with 24mp plus upgrades to the D5100 with the same chip, no doubt, will be the future. Let it all settle down and in the meantime get the Canon 1100d. Canon lenses are just brilliant.

    Stotty2910
    23 Apr 2012 - 9:02 PM

    Thanks for the advice on the D90 Grin
    As i mentioned before the canons dont feel very comfy for me Sad. Would you recomend the equivilent nikon as they feel abit better to hold. say the 3100

    BobEH
    BobEH  8 United Kingdom
    23 Apr 2012 - 9:15 PM

    Thery are all good. The D5100 is excellent and tons better than the 3100. That is the one I would go for, but get the 16 - 85 lens. Best of luck, I am sure you will be happy with whatever you buy.

    Dave B
    Dave B  11113 forum posts United Kingdom
    24 Apr 2012 - 8:37 AM

    Hi Stotty,

    I don’t really think there is one specific DSLR that will meet a new photographer’s needs whilst others won’t. They really are all just different shades of ‘good’. One or two may have a feature that you particularly want/need and that’s great …. go for that. The fact that you have already decided that the Nikons “feel better in your hand” is IMHO the way to look at it, not making a decision from spec lists. You also say that Video is not important to you and that also shows that you are already thinking clearly about what you need and don’t ned.

    I often tell people that they won’t really know what they want in a DSLR system until they buy their second one so for your first camera, personally, I’d not spent too many hard earned spondoolas. Better to get something from the entry range that you like the feel of just to get you started, with the idea that in 12 months time you may be in a position to ‘get serious’. Should you find that photography is not really for you as much as you thought then you haven’t spent too much. Should you find that your photography takes off then you won’t feel too much pain in changing brand / model / lens etc should you wish to

    The other thing I’d emphasise is the word ‘system’ I used above. To be honest the actual body is temporary, bodies come and go. Once you commit to Canon / Nikon / whatever then, after a period of building up your gear, it can be difficult to change brands due to the investment you have made so it’s best to feel comfortable before you get really serious. I’m encamped in the Canon camp however that’s just because the 10D was my first DSLR, no other reason. At that time Canon, Nikon and Fuji were the main players but others have come along since with the most prominent being Sony.

    My recommendation to any new photographer would be …… forget trying to decide which camera is best - this one or that one/ There is no such thing. Get a camera that feels right in the hand and has the main features you want. Don’t spend too much (even think of second hand). If you move up to a more advanced model you can always sell on your ‘nearly new’ entry level camera (or keep it as a back up). Better to make the big money decisions in a few months or a year’s time when you have the knowledge & experience to determine what you need. You have the whole summer to bang away, get out there with an entry level body and kit lens and just enjoy it until you get into the swing of things.

    BTW ..... once bitten by the photography bug there is no escape Wink

    Good luck, Dave B.

    darranl
    darranl  5318 forum posts England
    24 Apr 2012 - 10:34 AM


    Quote: Thery are all good. The D5100 is excellent and tons better than the 3100.

    Looking at the specs I had wondered for a while if the D3100 had everything that people would need but it does seem that there are a couple of features Nikon have decided to drop off their entry level model. Personally when I chose my camera I had a choice between the D3000, the D5000 and the D90 - at the time I avoided the D90 as it was about to be replaced also not sure if it is true but I have heard in lens motors are faster than in-body motors, I avoided the D3000 due to the lack of live view so settled on the D5000 which I am more than happy with.

    The list of features I wouldn't mind my camera having is quite short: -
    - 100 view in view finder.
    - Depth of field preview.
    - Master controller for flash.

    Like you I tried both Canon and Nikon in the shop (actually thought I would bu cannon) but the Nikon felt more comfortable to hold in my hands as well.

    If I had to make the same decision today even knowing what I know after having the camera for almost two years I think my choice would be between the D5100 and D7000 but only going for the D7000 if I could afford the difference and wouldn't be unhappy with the D5100.

    I think it is definitely true that the thing you will find has the biggest effect on any images you capture will be the lenses you use and most importantly you, that is the down side of owning a DSLR - no longer blaming the camera but identifying the things you did wrong Wink

    thewilliam
    24 Apr 2012 - 10:47 AM

    As the OP has rightly said, a beginner is in no position to choose a camera.

    There's a lot to be said for getting an upper-level used model from the previous generation. When you've used it for a while, you'll have a clear idea of what you want and don't want. Your next purchase is likely to be the right one and you'll get your money back when you sell the first body.

    Invest in good lenses.

    The entry-level Nikon bodies will give you pix that are very nearly as good as the top of the range model. The snag is that creative controls are buried in the menu system where the average punter won't find them. When set to auto-everything, the camera will give good results, even to a complete novice. Nikon very sensibly make it difficult for the incompetent to mess things up by making adjustments!

    darranl
    darranl  5318 forum posts England
    24 Apr 2012 - 10:53 AM


    Quote: The snag is that creative controls are buried in the menu system where the average punter won't find them.

    Which controlls can't be controlled? If find very little that I need to go deep in the menus - the main one being the mirror delay.


    Quote: When set to auto-everything, the camera will give good results

    On my camera it is actually the auto controls that I don't know how to use as I avoided them from the beginning.

    llareggub
    llareggub  3664 forum posts United Kingdom
    24 Apr 2012 - 12:24 PM

    I've been using an SLR for a little over a couple of years and pretty much started from scratch with photography, if I had to start again I probably would have bought a 2nd hand previous generation model with a low(ish) shutter count and spent much more time in chosing the lenses that I purchased.

    I am still running a fairly old entry level body but I dont shoot sports or low light very often so don't miss some of the bells and whistles in what I shoot so will run my body till it dies or I complete filling my modest lens list, which ever comes first Wink

    thewilliam
    24 Apr 2012 - 2:52 PM

    Darranl, take a close look at a Nikon D3100.

    darranl
    darranl  5318 forum posts England
    24 Apr 2012 - 4:09 PM

    @thewilliam - not following, what about the D3100?

    Stotty2910
    24 Apr 2012 - 6:13 PM

    Wow Thank you all for your input Grin glad to know there is always help. Grin

    As for the camera i think im going to start with the D3100 and the extra money that i would have spent on the body ill save for when i want some new lenses.
    I am just going for what is comfy as like it as been said i need to learn about photography before spending to much money and confusing myself with enthuast controlls.

    As for the 'auto everything' this will be good for quick family stuff but i really want to use the manual mode's as i dnt want to be a point and shoot photographer i want to get my photographs with thinking and fiddling with settings as a begginer haha. to get use to the essentials for photography.

    i hope this makes sence it made sence in my head haha

    Cheers Stotty

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