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EIZO Monitor question (CG241W)

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    Cookie_Monster
    Cookie_Monster e2 Member 2Cookie_Monster vcard Germany1 Constructive Critique Points
    6 Jun 2014 - 10:48 PM

    Maybe a silly question but ......
    Looked for a monitor specifically for image processing and was able by a used Eizo ColorEdge CG241W.
    It arrived and looks complete. However, when looking at the images on Eizo one of them shows the monitor with a 'thing' hanging in front of the monitor (looks a bit like a mouse). What is that? I looked at all the parts Eizo lists and none of them seemed to be it.
    Any help is appreciated here.

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    6 Jun 2014 - 10:48 PM

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    RoyBoy
    RoyBoy  10173 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
    6 Jun 2014 - 10:58 PM

    I suspect that you are referring to the calibration device

    Cookie_Monster
    Cookie_Monster e2 Member 2Cookie_Monster vcard Germany1 Constructive Critique Points
    6 Jun 2014 - 11:07 PM

    Confirming my worst fear .......
    Meaning the monitor useless without it?
    Could I buy that from somewhere?

    keithh
    keithh e2 Member 1023173 forum postskeithh vcard Wallis and Futuna33 Constructive Critique Points
    6 Jun 2014 - 11:23 PM

    Well it's not useless without it but any hardware calibration device will do the job. As with most things you get what you pay for but most consumer units are much of a muchness. 60 for a color munki smile up to 180 for a i1 Pro.

    Cookie_Monster
    Cookie_Monster e2 Member 2Cookie_Monster vcard Germany1 Constructive Critique Points
    7 Jun 2014 - 2:03 AM

    I keep looking around and can't really find anywhere in the manual a mention of the devise. I did however find a EIZO video on youtube that talks of integrated calibration devise. So will have to set it all up and see what happens.
    I paid $600 for it, so I guess even if I have to pay for the devise it is still a good deal.

    I will post update.

    Last Modified By Cookie_Monster at 7 Jun 2014 - 2:03 AM
    keithh
    keithh e2 Member 1023173 forum postskeithh vcard Wallis and Futuna33 Constructive Critique Points
    7 Jun 2014 - 7:49 AM

    It's an older model. I would have thought it came with software and maybe even included hardware that is no longer with it.

    thewilliam
    7 Jun 2014 - 12:07 PM

    A monitor calibration device is something that you use occasionally so you could always borrow from a friend.

    When buying, especially second-hand, you need to check that the intended calibrator will work with your computer's operating system.

    Most of our imaging machines still use Windows XP but the latest acquisition has Windows 8 and the software of our EyeOne isn't compatible. The dealer admitted that the manufacturer wasn't supporting this "old" calibrator because we were supposed to update and buy a new one. We did buy another but not one of theirs!

    here4years
    here4years e2 Member 199 forum postshere4years vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
    7 Jun 2014 - 1:46 PM


    Quote: A monitor calibration device is something that you use occasionally

    As far as I know, monitor calibration should be carried out frequently as the settings tend to drift.

    GlennH
    GlennH  91918 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
    7 Jun 2014 - 2:52 PM

    Monitor calibrators also drift in accuracy over time, so buying a secondhand one could very well be a false economy. I tend to agree with William that calibrating occasionally is fine for most people, although this will obviously vary from person to person according to monitor usage and need. The backlighting in the monitor will also play a part, since LED backlighting theoretically fades at a slower pace than CCFL. The software support issue may possibly be improved by using 3rd party software (e.g. BasICColor Display).

    thewilliam
    9 Jun 2014 - 9:59 AM

    I'd suggest using the classic "quality assurance" approach to monitor calibration.

    We're vulgar professionals with several workstations so, at the start of each day, we can bring the same image up on each monitor. If they look the same, they're probably correct.

    You can have a "standard" print which you can compare with the monitor and check that they look the same.

    With high quality monitors, I see little point in over-frequent calibration, once a month should be plenty: hence my suggestion to borrow a calibrator but use the same one each time.

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