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Dvaid
Dvaid  5166 forum posts United Kingdom
2 Oct 2012 - 10:45 PM

To visit with.(to visit)
leatheredge (leverage)
weld (world)
gells( girls)
skedule(schedule as in shed)
less(fewer)
except (accept)

All heard on the BBC! RIP British English.

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2 Oct 2012 - 10:45 PM

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Tooth
Tooth  95772 forum posts Ireland227 Constructive Critique Points
3 Oct 2012 - 12:06 AM

People giving fulsome apologies (again heard on the BBC) . Fulsome means fawning, grovelling, insincere..waether people saying the temp. will be "between ten to thirteen degrees.."

User_Removed
3 Oct 2012 - 12:10 AM


Quote: Fulsome means fawning, grovelling, insincere

I just looked fulsome up and meanings are

1) Complimentary or flattering to an excessive degree and
2) Of large size or quantity; generous or abundant

It's fine to use the word in the way the BBC used it.

User_Removed
3 Oct 2012 - 12:14 AM

I find it annoying when people prefix something with "literally" when they aren't being literal eg saying "My lips are literally frozen solid"

rhol2
rhol2  3273 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
3 Oct 2012 - 12:34 AM

Being offered something "for free"..instead of simply "free".

shadow18
shadow18  3406 forum posts England
3 Oct 2012 - 6:10 AM


Quote:

And I guess Shakespeare, Dr Johnson, Bronte and Byron would say the same thing.
Quote:

Yeah! My teacher always said "Does usage follow grammar, or does grammar follow usage?" then he said the answer really is both.
If you think about it, why do we think that current proper English is better than maybe old English or middle English? What about when the French added a bunch of words, did that make English better?

Things are so much broader than our own time frame! A daunting thought!!

Still though, I am always compelled to correct my television, signs in stores or anywhere, and my family! Lol Smile

newfocus
newfocus  7644 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
3 Oct 2012 - 8:30 AM


Quote: when people prefix something with "literally"

Cautionary vision of the future

thewilliam
3 Oct 2012 - 9:14 AM

When I was at primary school in the 1950s, my father bought us an American textbook of English grammar. It had wonderful cartoons to illustrate many of the points and apart from the "strange" spelling of a few words, it was better than any text published in the UK.

Paul_Anthony
3 Oct 2012 - 1:49 PM

Being labelled a 'Vulgar Professional'

Although I have had my moments, I do not consider myself to be 'Vulgar'. I much prefer 'Photographer'.

Paul

paulcookphotography

My pet hate is the good old "glass half empty/half full" debate.

It's so absurdly stupid it has gone on for so long. It's only simple maths after all.

Full = 100%
Empty = 0%
Half = 50%

So therefore -

"half full" is 50% of 100% = 50%
"half empty" is 50% of 0% = 0%

So nothing can actually be classed as half empty if it does actually contain any of its original volume.

Phew! Ok, rant over Smile

lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1013937 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
4 Oct 2012 - 10:49 AM

I just think the glass is too big...

Paul_Anthony
4 Oct 2012 - 10:52 AM


Quote: "half full" is 50% of 100% = 50%
"half empty" is 50% of 0% = 0%

So it's better to have a glass half full as you have 50% rather than 0% if your glass is half empty? Tongue

answersonapostcard
answersonapostcard Site Moderator 1012491 forum postsanswersonapostcard vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
4 Oct 2012 - 10:53 AM

Doesnt it depend on what your glass is half full of ?? Wink

Sooty_1
Sooty_1 Critique Team 31125 forum posts United Kingdom192 Constructive Critique Points
4 Oct 2012 - 11:08 AM

I'm with Lobsterboy...

A pessimist thinks the glass is half empty
An optimist thinks it's half full
An engineer thinks the glass is twice the size it needs to be

Nick

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade  1014555 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
4 Oct 2012 - 11:56 AM

Whether you think you can do it or not, you're right....


That's the difference between a pessimist and optimist, according to billionaire optimist Henry Ford Wink

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