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Expressions that annoy you


3 Apr 2010 12:55AM
lol

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roxpix 11 2.2k 11 Scotland
3 Apr 2010 8:20AM
As we know Glaswegians are a breed apart and the longest word they can use is 'situation'
Now unfortunately this is just far too many syllables for them so they have split it into 2 words sit & uation (as demonstrated by any Glaswegian involved in football) Wink
RichardN00 8 430 1 United Kingdom
3 Apr 2010 8:57AM
One former manager I had, used this a lot in meetings:

"I'm feeling a lot of negativity here!"

No - we're just dissagreeing with your half-ar*ed, badly thought out plans

Agree about "Awesome!" I'm working with someone who spent a couple of years in the USA and he now seems to be in permanent awe of everything, it drives me mad.

On the subject of using 'can' for 'may'I got into trouble a couple of years back when someone fairly senior sent a mail;

"Can I have my accounts password reset?"

I sent back the one word answer

"Yes"

He replied

"What do you mean, yes"

I sent back

"Yes, you do have the ability to have your accounts password reset"

He called me a pedantic so and so and complained to my boss


Luckily he was not well liked and everybody else found it funny

Richard
MrsS e2
8 4.5k 18 England
3 Apr 2010 9:23AM

Quote:People that now say 'I would of....' instead of 'I would have...' - this now seems to be the norm even though it is rubbish.

would of
should of
could of

all of these drive me up the wall!

See them all the time in the children's writing - comes from the fact that would've, could've and should've are contractions with the apostrophe showing where the ha is missing - BUT -once you pronounce it would of, etc., there's no hope!

Ask my Y3 (another import from our "friends" across the pond - what's wrong with first year juniors?) class about my rant on the subject!!

Fran x
lobsterboy e2
11 14.3k 13 United Kingdom
3 Apr 2010 9:44AM
I can't believe people get upset by this stuff - I think you all need to chillax Wink
Coleslaw e2
9 13.4k 28 Wales
3 Apr 2010 10:03AM
Yeah, absolutely, I mean it is like, you know, watching Grumpy Old Men. At the end of the day, it is like, we say what we like, innit, you know what I mean.
Billlee e2
8 5.5k England
3 Apr 2010 10:13AM
Whatever !!
AshTree e2
5 1.7k 6 England
3 Apr 2010 10:42AM

Quote:"The engineers haven't gotten there yet" it's got there or haven't arrived.


This one always interests me - 'gotten' is actually the archaic past participle of the verb 'To Get'. Quote from WikiAnswers below:

"Gotten is correct, and very old. In England many people wrongly assume that gotten is a modern Americanism, but the truth is the English more-or-less stopped using it, and have forgotten (!) that they used to use it."

Theresa
User_Removed 7 2.2k 3 United Kingdom
3 Apr 2010 11:21AM
Bill Bryson's excellent book 'A History Of Everything' postulates that there's many Olde English structures still persistent in American English, simply because that was how English worked when the Pilgrim Fathers first went over there and took it with them. The American practice of verbing nouns, for example, is typical of the English of the period and Shakespeare was renowned for it.
keith selmes 11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
3 Apr 2010 12:24PM
I've been criticised for spelling organization the American way. Actually its the English spelling. But since the disagreement with the colonies, the British have changed their spelling, and the Yankees haven't.

(My spell checker has underlined "crticised" in red Smile)
Rev2 4 240 2 United Kingdom
3 Apr 2010 12:48PM

Quote:"The engineers haven't gotten there yet" it's got there or haven't arrived.

This one always interests me - 'gotten' is actually the archaic past participle of the verb 'To Get'. Quote from WikiAnswers below:

"Gotten is correct, and very old. In England many people wrongly assume that gotten is a modern Americanism, but the truth is the English more-or-less stopped using it, and have forgotten (!) that they used to use it."

Theresa



Interesting, so many people use it I should've gotten used to it by now. Tongue
dlegros e2
12 217 England
3 Apr 2010 12:49PM

Quote:Bill Bryson's excellent book 'A History Of Everything' postulates that there's many Olde English structures still persistent in American English, simply because that was how English worked when the Pilgrim Fathers first went over there and took it with them. The American practice of verbing nouns, for example, is typical of the English of the period and Shakespeare was renowned for it.


I would also suggest his book "Mother Tongue"

So-called "Americanisms" such as color are also examples of how the language was when we exported it with the pilgrims - we have changed to colour since then, so maybe the American spelling is technically more correct! After all, you can drive a tractor, but not a tractour! Smile
Billlee e2
8 5.5k England
3 Apr 2010 12:49PM
So are "Burglarized" and "Aluminum" correct I wonder ?
Tooth e2
9 5.8k 227 Ireland
3 Apr 2010 12:50PM
People wanting to revert to me....

and being very picky now..

(eg in a weather forecast) "lowest temperatures of between three to seven degrees"

oh, and it's consisting of or comprising, but not comprising of....

and finally (for a while)...grown-up establishments assuming that all you need to do to be cool with youngsters is to spell things wrong (Kool Kamps, etc..)
3 Apr 2010 12:57PM
I had a boss that used to "sit in a dark room with a damp cloth on his head" quite often, needless to say he isnt my boss anymore...Wink

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